Entrepreneurial and creative society

Search By: 'community' Show all

Create Law-Free Zones for testing business ideas

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 10/19/2016 1476910948
Starting a business is a headache and starting something that hasn't been done before is extremely difficult with current laws, by-laws, zoning requir .... Read more

Starting a business is a headache and starting something that hasn't been done before is extremely difficult with current laws, by-laws, zoning requirements, permits, inspections etc.

So here is my idea: Create Law-Free zones available for all Canadian citizens. I do not mean a place were drug lords and violent criminals are free to run wild. I mean a physical place where innovators and potential entrepreneurs can go and put up structures, test products, and test new food production methods without all the red tape and current laws. A place where someone can go with their new idea and borrow some space for some time and test it out assuming all risk. If it doesn't work they don't loose but if it does work they can pursue it without the expense of trying to get through the red tape because that is what stops most people.

Think of this ideas like university study rooms. You can book a block of time and study at no cost. When you are done the space is available for someone else. Canada has a lot of unused land that can easily support this sort of thing.

If someone creates a new method of transportation they cannot test it on our roads because of the legal issues. If they want to build it and test it there are many laws against it. But if they had a place to test and create without laws they can create something new and then conform or get advice on new laws.

0

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

1

Like

Invest in infrastructure and programs that support bridging organizations

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 09/28/2016 1475078390
A key to Memorial’s ongoing success in supporting provincial and national innovation and prosperity has been the success of a number of universi .... Read more

A key to Memorial’s ongoing success in supporting provincial and national innovation and prosperity has been the success of a number of university units and centres that exist to help bridge the divide between university knowledge and community needs. Consistent with the recommendations of the Jenkins Task force, these organizations work with industry, government, and community partners to help turn ideas into innovative solutions, bolster industry-led R&D, an area in which Canada lags behind other OECD nations, and form the heart of sectoral clusters.

Since its inception, Memorial has had a legislative mandate to contribute to the social and economic development of the province. This “special obligation” to the people of Newfoundland and Labrador had led to a university that is an international leader in publicly-engaged teaching and learning and research. Experiential learning, service learning, applied research, and faculty members and staff with expertise and commitment to knowledge mobilization and community-based research, typify Memorial’s leadership in partnering with industry, community organizations and governments within the province and beyond.

A key element of this success has been the establishment of boundary-spanning institutions and mechanisms that enable external partners to access the expertise and resources of university faculty and staff, and which enable research, teaching and learning to respond to needs and opportunities identified by external partners. These vehicles for innovation and collaboration also facilitate mutual identification of shared projects, ground-truthing during the research and commercialization process, and result in external partners who have commitment to apply results in real world contexts.

Drs. David Wolfe and Peter Warrian of the Innovation Policy Lab at the Munk School, University of Toronto, recently completed a report, “C-CORE as a Networked Industrial Policy Initiative,” highlighted this unique university-owned, entrepreneurial boundary spanner organization (elaborated upon below). Drs. Wolfe and Warrian are now embarking on a study of the Marine Institute at Memorial, another world-leading unit which links the applied training and industrial-sponsored research of a polytechnic, with the research expertise and highly trained personal of the university.

Memorial also has nationally and internationally recognized units in the Genesis Centre technology incubator, the Lesley Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development, identified by the OECD as an international best practice, and the NL Centre of Applied Health Research, with a Director who reports jointly to the Dean of Medicine and the Deputy Minister of Health. Memorial is also the developer and steward of Yaffle, an on-line connecting tool being expanded to the college system in NL and to universities in the Maritimes and potentially across the country.

The federal government should work with the funding councils and the National Research Council, or establish separate departmental programing, to support such critically important boundary spanning institutions and on-line tools.

The federal government should make a strategic investment in the economic and environmental well-being of Canada through supporting the establishment of the Fisheries and Marine Institute Holyrood Marine Base Phase IIB ($25 million) and the C-CORE Cold Ocean Oil Spill Response Centre of Excellence ($35 million).

Credit: Memorial University of Newfoundland

0

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

1

Like

a more inclusive stock market

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 09/24/2016 1474743863
often gifted people with disabilities are restricted to what they can invest in because of the terms of the disability checks, which do not allow big .... Read more

often gifted people with disabilities are restricted to what they can invest in because of the terms of the disability checks, which do not allow big investments,but it also includes provincial for example in Ontario w/ odsp you can only do so much before the disability plan is voided,what we need the government to do is put measures in place including provincial governments , so everyone can be included in the economy

1

Views

1

Comments

2

Follows

2

Like

Whole Girl, Whole World through Digital Filmmaking

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/23/2016 1474645330
Digital filmmaking has become more pervasive than ever in all areas of life. The influential broadcasting quality of the film medium is apparent on vi .... Read more

Digital filmmaking has become more pervasive than ever in all areas of life. The influential broadcasting quality of the film medium is apparent on virtual platforms like YouTube, where millions of young people view independent films every day. With this distribution power, young women’s perspectives can impact their families, peers, communities, and the world.

Credit: Chantal Drolet

1

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

1

Like

Talent and knowledge mobilization / Talent et mobilisation du savoir

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/16/2016 1474055228
In Canada’s sesquicentennial year, over one million undergraduates are entering university halls across the country. These students are the foun .... Read more

In Canada’s sesquicentennial year, over one million undergraduates are entering university halls across the country. These students are the foundation of Canada’s innovative future. Canada’s universities are committed to equipping these students with the skills and knowledge they need to flourish in work and life, empowering them to contribute to Canada’s economic and social success.

We need to do better as a country to meet the aspirations and unlock the potential of Indigenous youth – their community’s future leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs. Currently, only 11 per cent of Indigenous peoples aged 25 to 34 in Canada have a university degree, compared to 33 per cent of non-Indigenous Canadians in the same age group.

  • Universities Canada aspires to significantly reduce the gap between the university participation rate of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians within the next ten years, by increasing federal financial assistance to Indigenous students and institutional efforts.
  • Universities Canada also recommends supporting more Indigenous students to pursue graduate and post-doctoral studies, growing the cohort of Indigenous university faculty and researchers and boosting their engagement in Canada’s innovative future.

Through work-integrated learning, hands-on research training, and global experiences, Canadian university graduates are educated in a culture of innovation and prepared with 21st century skills including flexibility, adaptability, and an openness to risk-taking.

We support the call by the Canadian Business/Higher Education Roundtable for access to work-integrated learning for 100 per cent of Canadian postsecondary students.

  • To support this goal, Universities Canada, along with national business and student groups, recommends investment in new federal measures, such as vouchers and tax credits, to incentivize employers – particularly in small- and medium-sized enterprises and not-for-profit organizations – to create more paid co-op and internship placements across disciplines and address the barriers employers face in offering such placements.

Canada’s universities are dynamic and supportive partners in helping businesses and not-for-profit organizations solve their problems. One of the greatest contributions universities make to innovation is equipping their graduates with the skills, knowledge and mindset to contribute to our contemporary and future economy. Through a range of knowledge mobilization activities – hands-on learning experiences of co-op students and graduates, community service and outreach, public policy engagement, inter-sectoral partnerships, and the commercialization of research – universities contribute to innovation, prosperity and the quality of life in Canada. Such a flexible approach is needed as no one-size-fits-all approach will suit the diverse needs and capabilities across Canada’s regions. Commercialization contributions are made by universities as valued research partners and through knowledge spill-overs in the form of spin-off companies.

  • Canada’s universities have proven themselves to be prolific generators of new ideas and designs, but R&D assistance is needed in the start-up phase to bridge the capital and financing gap between the initial idea and venture capital stages of the commercialization wave.
  • Targeted support should also be provided to encourage incubation and acceleration on university campuses, and to facilitate access to risk capital. Our graduates abound with ideas, but help is needed to develop strong and nimble start-ups that can grow into globally competitive companies.

Universities can also provide support to young companies by helping educate business talent in areas where we know Canada needs improvement – training executive talent with the ability to scale-up small start-ups, and building know ledge of sales into the business curriculum to assist small companies to grow.

 ----------------------------------

À l’approche du 150e anniversaire de la Confédération, plus de un million d’étudiants au premier cycle font leur entrée à l’université d’un bout à l’autre du pays. Ces étudiants sont le fondement de l’innovation future au Canada. Les universités s’engagent à inculquer à ces étudiants les compétences et le savoir dont ils ont besoin pour s’épanouir sur les plans personnel et professionnel, et ainsi contribuer à la réussite économique et sociale du Canada.

Le Canada doit faire plus pour concrétiser les aspirations et réaliser le potentiel des jeunes Autochtones, qui seront les dirigeants, les innovateurs et les entrepreneurs de demain dans leurs collectivités. À l’heure actuelle, seulement 11 pour cent des Autochtones de 25 à 34 ans possèdent un diplôme universitaire, comparativement à 33 pour cent des Canadiens non autochtones du même groupe d’âge.

  • Universités Canada aspire à réduire considérablement l’écart entre Canadiens autochtones et non autochtones en matière de taux de fréquentation de l’université au cours des 10 prochaines années par la hausse de l’aide financière fédérale aux étudiants autochtones et des initiatives des établissements d’enseignement.
  • Universités Canada recommande également d’appuyer un plus grand nombre d’étudiants autochtones pour qu’ils entreprennent des études aux cycles supérieurs et au niveau postdoctoral, d’augmenter le nombre de professeurs et de chercheurs autochtones, et d’accroître leur participation à l’innovation future du Canada.

Par l’apprentissage intégré au travail, la recherche sur le terrain et les expériences à l’étranger, les diplômés universitaires canadiens sont formés au sein d’une culture d’innovation et acquièrent des compétences du XXIe siècle, dont la souplesse, la capacité d’adaptation et une ouverture au risque.

 

Universités Canada appuie les revendications de la Table ronde de l’enseignement supérieur et les entreprises, qui réclame l’accès à des expériences d’apprentissage intégré au travail pour tous les étudiants canadiens de niveau postsecondaire.

  • À cette fin, Universités Canada et d’autres groupes nationaux étudiant et des milieux des affaires et recommandent au gouvernement fédéral d’investir dans de nouvelles mesures, comme des bons et des crédits d’impôt, pour inciter les employeurs – surtout les PME et les organisations à but non lucratif – à créer plus de stages rémunérés dans toutes les disciplines et à résoudre les difficultés qui les empêchent d’offrir ce type d’expériences aux étudiants.

Les universités canadiennes sont des partenaires dynamiques qui aident les entreprises et les organisations à but non lucratif à trouver des solutions à leurs problèmes. Une des plus grandes contributions des universités en matière d’innovation est de donner à leurs diplômés les compétences, les connaissances et la mentalité nécessaires pour participer à l’économie du XXIe siècle. Les universités contribuent à l’innovation, à la prospérité et à la qualité de vie des Canadiens grâce à diverses activités de mobilisation du savoir. Il suffit de penser aux programmes d’enseignement coopératif qui offrent aux étudiants des expériences d’apprentissage sur le terrain, aux activités de service à la collectivité, à la participation à l’établissement des politiques publiques, aux partenariats intersectoriels et aux activités de commercialisation de la recherche. La souplesse est de mise, car il n’existe pas de démarche unique en mesure de répondre aux besoins des différentes régions du Canada.

Les universités contribuent à la commercialisation de la recherche en agissant comme précieux partenaires de recherche et en favorisant la transmission du savoir par le démarrage d’entreprises.

  • Les universités sont une source intarissable de nouvelles idées, mais elles requièrent du soutien en recherche-développement (R-D) pendant la phase de démarrage pour faire le lien entre l’idée initiale et les capitaux de risque nécessaires à sa concrétisation pendant le processus de commercialisation.
  • Il faut également offrir un soutien ciblé pour favoriser l’incubation et l’accélération sur les campus et faciliter l’accès au capital de risque. Nos diplômés ne manquent pas d’idées, mais ils ont besoin d’appuis pour mettre sur pied de jeunes entreprises solides et souples en mesure de devenir concurrentielles à l’échelle mondiale.

Les universités peuvent également soutenir les jeunes entreprises en offrant une formation en administration des affaires dans les domaines où le Canada peut faire mieux, soit en formant des dirigeants à faire croître des entreprises en démarrage et en intégrant des connaissances sur les ventes aux cours des programmes de commerce pour aider les petites entreprises à grandir.

Credit: Universities Canada / Universités Canada

0

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

1

Like

STEM Learning Ecosystem

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/14/2016 1473894497
Cross-sector collaboration of science and technology education providers can result in a "learning ecosystem" with high potential for scaling. See th .... Read more

Cross-sector collaboration of science and technology education providers can result in a "learning ecosystem" with high potential for scaling. See the attached document for details.

Credit: Organizations include UBC, SFU, Genome BC, BC Science Teachers Assn, & the Mitchell Odyssey Fdn.

1

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

1

Like

Adopt an inclusive and coordinated approach to innovation programs, across disciplines and communities.

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/02/2016 1472843342
As Minister Bains recently said, “Canada needs a bold, coordinated strategy on innovation that delivers results for all Canadians.” It is .... Read more

As Minister Bains recently said, “Canada needs a bold, coordinated strategy on innovation that delivers results for all Canadians.” It is vital that in 2016, our approach to innovation is both an inclusive and coordinated one. A strategy that benefits only certain regions, industries, or disciplines will be insufficient for innovation leadership.

Without careful planning, the shift towards an increasingly tech-driven, globalized economy may exacerbate existing social disparities. An inclusive approach to innovation will make the most of the skills, qualifications, and ideas held across Canada’s diverse population, and in particular women, Indigenous peoples, and new Canadians.

Canada’s strategy must also promote new partnerships across sectors and borders, while avoiding duplication of efforts. Enhanced collaboration and greater integration among players in Canada’s innovation ecosystem must be a priority if public funds are to be invested as strategically and effectively as possible.

Mitacs supports these objectives by working with provincial, national and international partners across disciplines and sectors to improve Canadian productivity and growth. Our expansive network allows Mitacs’ innovation internships to be integrated into complimentary initiatives, avoiding duplication and presenting a simplified point of access for participants. Specifically, Mitacs has worked to support this coordination through partnerships with organizations like CIHR, SSHRC, NSERC, Genome Canada, NRC-IRAP and many more federally supported entities promoting Canadian innovation.

Finally, an inclusive and coordinated approach must recognize the continued importance of basic research. Mitacs encourages the federal government to support Canada’s granting councils, and to promote basic research at colleges, polytechnics and universities across Canada. Often, basic research leads to new discoveries, and support for untargeted research is important to our innovative future.

3

Views

0

Comments

0

Follows

1

Like

Use Social Procurement and Community Benefit Agreements for Inclusive Growth

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 08/24/2016 1472057550
Support enhanced market access for social enterprises and co-operatives by stimulating demand through social procurement policies and community benefi .... Read more

Support enhanced market access for social enterprises and co-operatives by stimulating demand through social procurement policies and community benefit agreements. Initiatives such as Buy Social Canada, L'économie sociale, j'achète, ECPAR and the Toronto Community Benefits Network are leading Canadian examples of this rapidly emerging practice.

Credit: Canadian CED Network, Buy Social Canada, Chantier de l'économie sociale, Toronto Community Benefits

11

Views

2

Comments

8

Follows

5

Like

Centralize and disseminate community information

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 08/23/2016 1471976610
When government departments announce events, initiatives, grants, programs, etc they should submit information into a central database, tagged with us .... Read more

When government departments announce events, initiatives, grants, programs, etc they should submit information into a central database, tagged with user selection filters (eg Heritage,Arts,Science,Aboriginal,Digital,Ontario etc), and dated. Allow Canadians to register and select the tags of interest such that new information is automatically pushed or emailed to interested parties. This way Canadians are proactively informed of news relevant to their needs, instead of finding out by accident, or never, as is most often the case. Searching through myriad government documents scattered over diverse platforms isn't practical. Think Google Alerts system for the Canadian government. Keep us informed EASILY.

4

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

3

Like

Provide more cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural opportunities

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/18/2016 1471551850
Beyond the specific vocational skills that are important for each of our graduates, transferable skills are equally important to ensuring graduates ar .... Read more

Beyond the specific vocational skills that are important for each of our graduates, transferable skills are equally important to ensuring graduates are ready for every changing job environment. Providing cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural opportunities to our young people will engage them in novel ways, and expand their thinking beyond their immediate professions. With increased globalization, it’s important for our graduates to have an international perspective – while also instilling in them the importance of engagement with their own local communities.  With technological changes also comes new opportunities for work in fields we haven’t even yet thought of – we need to prepare our graduates to be adaptable and to think in novel and creative ways.  To equip our young people for the future, we need to provide them with as many learning opportunities as possible outside the traditional classroom. This could include such things as international exchanges or placements, and community projects where students work to solve real community problems (likely in conjunction with different disciplines, adding to the cross-disciplinary experience).

Credit: Sheridan Faculty of Applied Health and Community Studies

3

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

1

Like

Fostering Innovation Through Creativity

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/16/2016 1471372233
Polytechnics across Canada and specifically at Sheridan support innovation through creativity, applied research, and our centres of excellence. At the .... Read more

Polytechnics across Canada and specifically at Sheridan support innovation through creativity, applied research, and our centres of excellence. At the heart of Sheridan’s support is our academic creativity programming, including Creative Problem Solving workshops, creativity breadth courses, and a Board Certificate in Creativity for our students in bachelor degree programs. Sheridan believes that creativity is the foundation of innovation, and has strived to embed creativity throughout our campuses and academic programs. Through Sheridan’s Creativity Institute, Sheridan is expanding into the community with creative problem solving workshops for local not-for-profits to find creative solutions to challenging problems. Over 1,900 students have taken courses in creativity at Sheridan, and at our most recent convocation, we awarded the first certificates for graduates who had completed the certificate program.

What separates Sheridan and other polytechnics across Canada is the ability and history of working with industry through our applied research projects, finding creative and innovative solutions to industry challenges using faculty and students who learn and work with them. Over 90 per cent of students at Sheridan have internship or field experience during their studies, while most senior students complete a term-long capstone project that can spark entrepreneurial opportunities not previously thought of. Sheridan is part of an innovation pipeline, creating the student who has the ability to have an idea and to then do something about it. Sheridan has created ties to existing entrepreneurial networks within the region and industry-specific innovation zones across Canada. More should be done to support the polytechnic applied research and capstone focus that allows for creativity to lead to innovation to lead to entrepreneurship.

1

Views

0

Comments

0

Follows

1

Like

Youth & Seniors Make Great Business Partners for Canada

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/11/2016 1470931877
Educating society to encourage young entrepreneurs who recognize the experience senior citizens aged 65+ bring to the table; whereby together they cr .... Read more

Educating society to encourage young entrepreneurs who recognize the experience senior citizens aged 65+ bring to the table; whereby together they create new revenue producing concepts which in turn create jobs and consequently TAX REVENUES for Canada.

THIS NEEDS TO BECOME BIBLE CODE FOR A STRONGER CANADA !

 

 

3

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

1

Like

Build An Online Global Mentoring Wisdom Tool - WisePeers.com

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 08/03/2016 1470237949
My idea for Canada to create a program called WisePeers. The idea to create a social media crowd sourcing platform that allows peers with diverse back .... Read more

My idea for Canada to create a program called WisePeers. The idea to create a social media crowd sourcing platform that allows peers with diverse background and located in different part of Canada and then in the world to connect positively. The connection will result in either improving an existing skill or brainstorming to resolve a problem facing one of the peers. It is an interdisciplinary online mentoring tool that helps different type of peers to interact and help each other in a chosen field. Canada will help make the world light wisdom one Wise Peer at a time in different categories mainly social entrepreneurship.

Canada will be the leader in creating the most positive social media site in the world that will light wisdom. Phase 1 of the project will be focused in Canada and different provinces and once results shows success we can move to Phase 2 and open it up globally.

WisePeers will let users choose a skill to be worked on from a predefined list created from the following common mentoring categories:

1) Youth related issues at school such as: lack of motivation to study, bullying, obesity, drug use, depression, lying,cheating, or expressing anger.

2) Career Development issues within private and public sector organizations such as: leadership, project management,career building, or learn new skill. mentor refugees to take the next step.

3) Entrepreneurship issues such as: risk taking, business planning, financial help, marketing, organization structure, or legal help.

Canada WisePeers innovation advantages:

- Can help information exchange and experience transfer.

- WisePeers can run on a larger scale than face to face mentoring interactions.

- Wise Peers can be assigned on an ad hoc basis without a centralized program.

- Allows peers to collaborate, reflect and connect as they are in one place which reduces the feelings of isolation.

- Ability to think through wisdom thoughts and questions prior to responding.

- WisePeers will offer global awarding ranks for both peers that they can build on to improve and become a wiser person in this world. It also provides a record of interactions. These ranks and records can used to build trust and recorded personal accomplishments. The ranking will be helping to define a realistic score for most influencing people in the world.

- WisePeers can make it easier for a peer to seek out more experiences peers based on complementary or similar skills and interests rather than superficial characteristics.

- Not constrained by geography and have huge potential to integrate all over the world.

- WisePeers can be advantageous for women and persons with disabilities due to a reduced emphasis on status,geographic location and demographics.

I own the rights for the name wisepeers.com and I have a complete design for the program that is not public yet and willing to share and take part in it.

5

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

2

Like

National Youth Science and Innovation Network

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/27/2016 1469642783
Stimulating interest in and supporting a national network for youth to explore hands-on, project-based science. Canada's response to the technologica .... Read more

Stimulating interest in and supporting a national network for youth to explore hands-on, project-based science.

Canada's response to the technological and space race in the 1960s was the development of local, regional and national opportunities to foster and showcase the innovativeness of youth in science - science fairs. Over five decades, this network - primarily driven by volunteers and teachers - has helped develop some of Canada's (and the world's) leaders in business, research, science and social impact. From Roberta Bondar to Michael Serbinis to Marc Kielburger to Raymond Wang, science fairs have helped shape the impact Canada has on the world.

Investing in a proven program that encourages youth from curiosity through to discovery will ensure Canada's success in innovation, skills development and will creates the nation's future economic leaders.

8

Views

1

Comments

2

Follows

3

Like

Fab Labs Nation

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/11/2016 1468243720
Le français suit. The “Fab Labs Nation” project proposes a concerted strategy to equip Canada with a digital manufacturing interstructur .... Read more

Le français suit.

The “Fab Labs Nation” project proposes a concerted strategy to equip Canada with a digital manufacturing interstructure that makes it possible to promote, entrepreneurship and the creation of jobs of the future as well as innovation in communities and businesses.

A Fab Lab is a collaborative innovation laboratory equipped with digital production machine tools (3D printers, laser cutters, digital milling machines, etc.) and an innovation accelerator where students, engineers, inventors, creators and all those who have a project gather to go from the idea to the object. The Fab Lab offers its users the means necessary for professional digital design to conduct collaborative innovation projects, access to quick prototyping.

A true international community gravitates around the Fab Labs, by implementing laboratories in hundreds of cities and villages. The potential which emanates from them for economic and social development steadily increases and is explored in numerous sectors: health, creativity, education, entrepreneurship, etc. The Fab Labs are part of an open innovation movement and are the tangible tools of a Smart City.

 

L'initiative « Fab Labs Nation » propose une stratégie concertée pour doter le Canada d’une interstructure de fabrication numérique permettant de favoriser l'entrepreneuriat et la création d'emplois d'avenir, l'innovation dans les communautés et les entreprises.

Un Fab Lab est un laboratoire d’innovation collaborative équipé de machines-outils de fabrication numérique (imprimante 3D, découpe laser, fraiseuse numérique, etc.) et un accélérateur d'innovation où les étudiants, les ingénieurs, les inventeurs, les créateurs et tous ceux qui ont un projet entrepreneurial se réunissent pour passer de l’idée à l’objet. Le Fab Lab offre à ses usagers les moyens de conception numérique professionnel nécessaires pour mener des projets d’innovation collaboratifs, l'accès au prototypage rapide.

Une véritable communauté internationale gravite autour des Fab Labs, par l'implantation de laboratoires dans des centaines de villes et villages. Le potentiel qui en découle pour le développement économique et social croit sans cesse et est exploré dans de multiples secteurs : santé, créativité, éducation, entrepreneurship, etc.. Les Fab Labs font partie du mouvement d'innovation ouverte (open innovation) et sont les outils concrets d'une Ville intelligente (Smart City).

 Source : http://www.communautique.quebec/portfolio-items/fablabs-nation/?portfolioID=33

 

 

32

Views

5

Comments

15

Follows

22

Like

Social Innovation of Collaborative Commons - to Complement Rapid Technological Innovation

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 07/10/2016 1468165446
Rapid technological advances are both enabling and driving a shift toward Collaborative Commons (CC) as a socio-economic paradigm of the future (see B .... Read more

Rapid technological advances are both enabling and driving a shift toward Collaborative Commons (CC) as a socio-economic paradigm of the future (see Background below). 

Social innovation, parallel to technological innovation, is needed to

  • Maximize the opportunities and benefits for ALL Canadians from CC
  • Minimize the inevitable disruption to lives during  transition to CC
  • Enable graceful transitional or sustained interplay with existing socio-economic models (as needed)
  • Discover the limits and avoid any pitfalls of CC
  • Engender trust among participants in CC
  • Develop a minimally intrusive Canadian regulatory framework to facilitate the above

To that end, the following is recommended:

  • Increase funding for Collaborative Commons academic research in social sciences and economics with the above objectives.
  • Establish a social entrepreneurship fund to support creation of specifically micro Collaborative Commons, and functional elements of Collaborative Commons.  Evaluate results.
  • Hold national events and competitions in Collaborative Commons innovation.
  • Develop prototype regulations relating to Collaborative Commons and run regulatory pilots to discover what works, before enacting (or not) fully into law.
  • Engage Canadians about Collaborative Commons to gather maximum diversity of ideas and input and generally garner buy-in (or not).
  • Collaborate with like-minded democratic states for additional innovation diversity and synergistic global implementation of Collaborative Commons

Background and Why

Society (and economy) is on the cusp of a dramatic disruption due to exponential rise in technological capability.   Technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and data analytics borne out of radical escalation of compute power, coupled with advances in sensor and communication technologies, and the ubiquity of the Internet have spawned the Internet of Things (IoT).  IoT is resolutely driving us into the Fourth Industrial revolution dominated by cyber-physical systems.  This will not only sharply reduce the need for human labour, it will also increasingly chip away the volume of human intellect and oversight needed.

At the same time, the Web is enabling the sharing economy.  It’s taking hold due to the inherent pull of convenience and cost savings, personal economic necessity, and desire for environmental sustainability.  The latter is also driving the Circular Economy, where materials and energy embedded in end-of-life products are recirculated into new goods and energy.  Both the sharing and circular economies will reduce the total volume of manufactured goods and raw materials needed, again correspondingly reducing the total human labour, intellect and oversight needed.

The double whammy of efficiencies and the reduced need for goods from above will, for many, reduce or eliminate the means for equitable living and ability to retain agency in society and economy.  Under the existing socio-economic paradigms, this concern will only deepen with ongoing technological advancements, further hollowing out the middle class.  The answer is definitely NOT to stall or stop technology.  On the contrary, Canadian technological innovation must forge ahead at full steam to enable us to compete internationally and grow the total national wealth.  However, social innovation must be tapped to enable ALL Canadians to both contribute to and take from the common wealth, and have full societal agency.

Fortunately an emerging “COLLABORATIVE COMMONS” paradigm shows promise as a new socio-economic order – both organically enabled by the Internet of Things, as well as a reaction to its impacts and side effects.  Collaborative Commons (CC) is characterised by open source information, technology and energy; the blurring of consumer vs. producers into prosumers; access to products becoming the norm over product ownership; and rise of the gig economy over traditional employment.  Basically, it’s a society where citizens and organizations openly collaborate to both create common wealth and draw from it.

While ad-hoc CC instances in some sectors are already generating benefits for its constituents, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges going forward.  What are the trade-offs between different CC models and what model(s) work best?  How can trust, which is critical to collaboration, be engendered and supported among participants? What might be some negative side-effects of CC?  How does CC interplay with traditional market economies, what sectors are best suited for CC, and what are the transition timeframes and trade-offs? What regulatory supports are needed to enable, ease transition, and protect against undesired aspects of the CC?  A heavy dose of Social Innovation is needed now to address the unknowns so that civil society can come out whole on the other side of the transition into Collaborative Commons.

This and related topics are skillfully covered by economist Jeremy Rifkin in The Zero Marginal Cost Society, and related works such as The Sharing Economy by Arun Sundararajan, and Makers and Takers by Rana Foroohar.

6

Views

0

Comments

2

Follows

2

Like

Increase Small Business and Youth Grants for Long-Term Media Projects

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 07/06/2016 1467829630
Since this section includes "creative society" as one of the qualifiers, I assume the Government of Canada must understand the benefit of arts and cul .... Read more

Since this section includes "creative society" as one of the qualifiers, I assume the Government of Canada must understand the benefit of arts and culture to society. How that sector can vitalize an economy, improve a community's competitive edge, make communities more attractive to investors and contribute to the development of a skilled workforce.The issue we have in Canada is that there is no incentive for a creative person, outside of national pride, to stay in Canada. Funding is more often than not geared towards established creatives and almost purely towards one-time projects. Small business and youth funding is directed almost exclusively to more secure and safer sectors.By encouraging investment in and funding actual businesses in the arts and culture sector the government of Canada would be making Canada a more attractive place to reside for everyone. On top of that a strong arts and culture sector attracts skilled workers of all stripes; from technically skilled workers to lawyers and investors.While there may be funding available in certain Canadian cities, there is also funding available in cultural centres like San Francisco and New York. If a young entrepreneur is seeking to start a business and are given the option of Ottawa or New York, they will often choose the latter at least in part because of the exciting culture that city has to offer.On top of that creativity is contagious. If a tech community is nestled against an enthused, vibrant arts community they will be more likely to take chances on innovation and gain the inspiration to think outside the box.

While we invest in the arts and culture sector currently it is largely on one-off projects. These projects don't give us the same economic benefit as long-term businesses. They do not attract investors or workers. They serve to highlight Canadian talent but won't create a self-sustaining community that generates revenue. Businesses such as production companies, galleries, publications, festivals, websites, increased funding for TV shows and other long-term projects should gain priority.When investors or workers choose to leave Canada or choose another country for investing, whether subconsciously or not, the choice often comes down to one word: boring. There is a clear cure for this; investment in businesses in arts and culture that have long-term potential.

4

Views

1

Comments

1

Follows

3

Like