Entrepreneurial and creative society

Search By: 'R&D' Show all

Accelerate Social R&D

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 10/27/2016 1477603337
The OECD estimates Canada spends over $300 billion on social outcomes. Unlocking Canada’s social assets, and dramatically improving Canada&rsquo .... Read more

The OECD estimates Canada spends over $300 billion on social outcomes. Unlocking Canada’s social assets, and dramatically improving Canada’s social performance, requires the intentional acceleration of Canada’s research and development capabilities across the social sector, aka “Social R&D:”

  1. Broaden eligibility for R&D funding and other federal support programs, to include nonprofit social impact organizations.
  2. Support the development of Social R&D open data infrastructure, metrics and assessment to accelerate impact as a learning sector.
  3. Expand and continuously update national well-being indices building on the Canadian Wellbeing and Social Progress indices.
  4. Support a dedicated Indigenous Innovation Demonstration Fund (IIDF) housed at Grand Challenges Canada.
  5. Provide long term funding for the applied research capabilities of universities and colleges to expand and integrate strong knowledge building, transfer and experiential learning partnerships with community organizations and business for social impact; examples are: the Community College Social Innovation Fund, ResearchImpact, LabWise, the UNB 7-lab network, the Systemic Design Exchange, CityStudio, Radius @SFU, RECODE, etc.
  6. Support development of a Pro Bono Marketplace (PBM) for skills-based volunteering that gives non-profits access to specialized management skills, tools and experience found in the private sector that they need in order to address specific challenges and opportunities, improve overall organizational learning and performance, and further strengthen working partnerships with the business community.
  7. Expand resources available for Social R&D through a contribution to the establishment of an arms-length multi-sector and multi-department fund that aggregates, reviews, and disburses philanthropic, private and public capital for high-impact experimentation. The fund would structure deals in a way that minimizes risk to public capital.
Credit: Social Innovation Generation

1

Views

1

Comments

2

Follows

2

Like

Fostering Innovation from Non-Traditional Sources

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 10/27/2016 1477536302
In a true innovative culture, innovation can and does come from many different sources.  Some may be traditional established companies or university .... Read more

In a true innovative culture, innovation can and does come from many different sources.  Some may be traditional established companies or university researchers, but in the modern age where access to information and ease of networking, collaborating and sharing of ideas have never been greater and “crowdsourcing” is increasingly becoming common, significant innovation is also being driven outside of these traditional sources.  Small startups, individual entrepreneurs, researchers and hobbyists, private collectives of innovators such as “hacker spaces”, and student teams and organizations are all filled with highly talented people and highly original ideas.  Moreover, these small, non-traditional innovators are typically much more nimble and have far less overhead than their larger, more established counterparts and as such can do “more with less”. 

Moreover, their work serves not only as a potential source of commercially viable products, technologies and future companies, but also as a direct, hands-on means of fostering learning, skills development and creativity that is invaluable in helping those who engage in it to reach their full potential as innovators and contributors to the creative economy.

To truly foster a culture of innovation, the government and its agencies should actively strive to make Canada among the most favourable countries in the world for this rapidly growing group of innovators.  The government should make it policy to recognize the existence of these small, non-traditional innovative groups and individuals as potentially valuable sources of both innovation and hands-on skills development, and ensure that support is specifically available to them that recognizes and is responsive to their unique needs, capabilities and situation, rather than being solely available to or heavily biased towards larger established companies and universities only. Such support may take the form of grants or funding, but could also include tax incentives, access to government facilities and government experts.

Not all innovators are the same, and the needs and abilities of individual or small groups of innovators are inherently different from those of large organizations, established companies and universities.  By ensuring support is specifically available to individuals and small groups engaged in innovative work, this large and growing source of innovation can be encouraged.

1

Views

0

Comments

1

Follows

2

Like