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National youth STEM and innovation development system - like hockey

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/02/2016 1467490212
Studies over the past 15 years have shown that about two-thirds of Canadian kids ages 12-18 think STEM is important, interesting, and fun. Canadian st .... Read more

Studies over the past 15 years have shown that about two-thirds of Canadian kids ages 12-18 think STEM is important, interesting, and fun. Canadian students rank in the top 10 of 65 OECD countries on international tests of science achievement. Our kids like, and are good at STEM.

Yet, despite this potential, only about 30% of Canadian high school students take STEM courses after grade 10, limiting their access to opportunities in STEM-related fields. No surprise that in 2014 the Canadian Council of Academies (CCA) reported that Canada’s total employment in STEM occupations was just 30% – 22nd out of 37 countries. Do our kids just lose interest in high school? Perhaps, but then how do we explain that 93% of Canadian adults are very or moderately interested in new scientific discoveries and technological developments (1st out of 33 countries), or that 32% visited a science centre/museum in the previous year (2nd out of 39 countries) – according to the same CCA report.

We’re good at getting Canadian kids interested in STEM. Over 100 organizations and institutions, from local to national, offer school presentations, workshops, camps, experiences, challenges, and competitions. They reach a huge number of students, but the percentage of high school students taking STEM courses has remained stubbornly around 30% for years. Canada has no lack of STEM promotion programs – we lack a national strategy and coordination.

PromoScience, through NSERC, provides federal funding for many of these programs – $4.8M over 3 years to 43 organizations in 2015. Grants are awarded through a peer-review process; however, there’s no analysis for redundancy, imbalances, and gaps – or even a program inventory to analyze. As a result, there’s no strategy underlying this funding, or benchmarks to measure progress; the best-written proposals get funded.

Canada produces great hockey players – and now Olympic athletes – because we have a development system. It starts by getting lots of young kids participating for fun. From there, those with ability and passion (and/or ‘enthusiastic’ parents) progress through a series of levels that build skills and identify top prospects. Canada has lots of Timbits-type STEM programs, but no system to guide those kids or parents when they ask, “What’s next?”

I propose that Canada build on its excellent STEM promotion capacity to establish a national youth STEM and innovation development system, similar to those for sports, to cultivate not only interest and excitement, but engagement, skills, and excellence. A national youth STEM and innovation advisory panel – leaders from the national youth STEM and innovation organizations; representatives of regional, provincial, and local organizations; and young Canadians – should be appointed to guide the process. They would start by building a national inventory of programs and then analyze to identify systemic strengths and weaknesses, recommend targets, and evaluate progress.

If we’re serious about developing youth with skills for the future economy, let’s get Canada’s youth STEM promotion organizations working together, rather than competing with each other for funding and profile. It works for hockey.

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Create Core Educational Policies and Build Expert Teams to Create Evidence-Based Educational Technologies, Learning Environments, and The World’s Leading Mobile Education Platform to Assist Teachers and Students Nationally and Worldwide

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/31/2016 1472624552
The learning environments and educational approaches utilized in the majority of classrooms across our country (particularly publicly funded post-seco .... Read more

The learning environments and educational approaches utilized in the majority of classrooms across our country (particularly publicly funded post-secondary institutions) are based on educational practices developed hundreds of years ago before digital technology was available. This creates a situation where a minority of students get access to effective teachers, while the majority must suffer from poorly delivered education based on ineffective educational practices which often ignore basic pedagogy. This is a systemic issue of educational inequality (prevalent throughout our institutions), which I would argue is a fundamental root issue in Canadian society. Since many citizens are largely unaware that this is even an issue, the problem remains unaddressed as other progressive nations jump ahead in this area of innovation. High quality, evidence based education should be a right for all people, and we are not currently progressing towards that goal at the pace that is required within our current national and global situation.

The government has made post-secondary education more affordable and accessible, but there is still no standard of quality and very little application of evidence based educational technology and learning environments. There is plenty of research that has been conducted in key universities that proves the effectiveness of progressive educational approaches (although many universities do not yet have programs offered in the Learning Sciences).

To attract and keep the world’s best talent, Canada needs a clear goal: to become a world leader in digital education technology (particularly evidence based solutions that are scalable) that can assist individual learners as well as blended learning environments, both throughout our country and throughout the world. Canada should aim to create value for the entire world by creating cross-platform applications that will work well across mobile and desktop platforms (likely with the focus being on mobile to benefit the most people). Canada should see evidence based education as a right to all people, and should aim to provide it to all of its citizens as well as people in third world countries. There are many people (in Canada and throughout the world) who don’t have access effective schools or effective teachers, which leads to a lower quality of life.

The best way to support startups and growing companies is to focus on effective 21st century education for all Canadians. That means focusing on areas such as basic computational thinking, problem solving, programming, health education, project-based learning, basic learning sciences education, educational technology development, and harnessing creativity and collaboration by the practice of creating solutions that add measurable value to people’s lives and the environment. This is the basis for creating an entrepreneurial and creative society. If students undergo project-based learning using digital technologies, public-private industry partnerships will naturally emerge, and startups will begin to flourish.

Canada has a strength in ICT technologies, but very few attempts are currently made to retain the talent that we produce. The people who leave Canada to work at top technology companies are usually motivated learners who frequently engage in self-directed learning. If Canada can produce the best educational technologies, these technologies can scale up and target everyone all the way from our children to the top technologists to improve their learning efficiency as they learn new technologies. It is only natural that they will then be interested in being part of this educational movement and want to contribute tools and content to the new educational platforms that are created. Since this goal has the higher purpose of improving the lives of Canadians and people worldwide, people will likely want to participate if it also means becoming global leaders in this emerging market. As more devices and people are added to the internet, having the best mobile education platforms will ensure Canada’s economic viability moving forward in the 21st century.

Creating a demand for research in educational development will spur scientific growth and excellence within our higher educational institutions. There is already good research being done which can be leveraged, but implementing those findings and testing which approaches are the most effective will be a scientific exercise. This will involve taking all the leading innovations and creating a landscape of cooperative competition among educators and technologists as we learn which approaches are the most effective in which situations. If Canada conducts this research and publishes the findings, other countries will begin to look to Canada for the best insights into learning sciences and effective education.

We can also leverage these educational platforms to inform our citizens about the most pressing issues we face as a nation and a species. By teaching all people how to use technology effectively, companies will naturally start to grow. By teaching all people about clean growth and the environment, our startups can have a positive impact on the earth. By teaching all people about local and global issues and creating effective impact, our effort can be directed in the most beneficial way. This provides the perfect foundation for Canada to become a strong competitor in today’s digital world. Delivering distributed educational solutions that really work is the one of the best value propositions that Canada can offer to the rest of the world.

If Canada is successful in creating scalable educational technology that can be easily delivered to other countries, clusters and partnerships will naturally emerge throughout the world. Canada can utilize its progressive political situation to help lift the world out of educational poverty, which is in line with the goals of the UN. Most of the other large issues in the world are arguably symptomatic of the root problem: inaccessible or ineffective education. Mobile technologies can be flexible to work in situations where not many devices are available or there is low internet connectivity. For example, paper materials can be printed based on the curriculum content stored within the platform, which can also be stored locally on devices if there is no connection. Or, the application can enter a mode where only the teacher uses it to guide lessons and manage student learning and progress. This can help fix the teaching gap that exists in counties around the world as it would not require teachers to be fully qualified to deliver material that has been proven to be effective in such situations, such as flipped/mastery/personalized/adaptive learning technologies (and so on). I could dive into the details of effective educational approaches here, but it is hard to summarize years of research and innovation that has happened in the top private institutions around the world in several paragraphs. Of course, I would be happy to provide additional resources and research, as well as several reports I’ve written that contain my own ideas of how to implement such educational platforms and environments.

Creating educational policy that ensures the availability of evidence-based educational technology and learning environments to all people helps Canadians greatly in the short term, but even more so in the long term. If we combine the diversity of skills that Canadians already possess with the ability to create effective technologies, Canada will produce innovations across a large spectrum of sectors. This is likely the ultimate way to stimulate economic development, create jobs and improve the lives of as many people as possible.

It is only a matter of time before coding education becomes mandatory within Canadian schools, or at the very least widely adopted. By investing in innovative educational technologies, Canada will not only be avoiding the pitfalls of the current approaches to coding education, but will also prevent us from having to outsource the job to other countries to provide often untested coding educational tools to us. This will save us money and produce value in our economy since the relationship will work the other way around. Although it is a good idea to provide free education the people who need it most (such as people in low-income situations inside and outside Canada), we can also create economic growth by selling to other wealthy nations. This will be a natural result of ubiquitous evidence based education which empowers all Canadians with the digital and entrepreneurial skills needed in the 21st century.

If ineffective coding education is provided to new students, they may fail to properly learn these digital technologies and simply assume that they are incapable of understanding core concepts in this area. When this happens, we lose another potential innovator and the person’s ability to create change in the world is significantly diminished. What we need is effective coding education that has been developed using the insights already available in our research sector.

Instead of simply throwing money at this problem, we should aim to create highly effective teams of educators who have extensive expertise in the areas of pedagogy, progressive educational technology and learning environments. These teams should be paired with our best technologists to create powerful educational platforms that meet a list of criteria for providing the most effective education possible. The technology should be low-cost, and evidence based. It should be a general solution, which allows our leading educators to easily insert their educational content to create courses and modules that can then undergo iterative improvement as they are utilized and tested among the population. After educators insert their educational content onto the platform, this content can be delivered to students with applications that leverage provide techniques and learning models, such as flipped classrooms or mastery learning models. For example, software that allows students to input data while watching videos (such as questions, confusion points, and notes) can assist in Flipped Classroom approaches. Software that breaks up learning modules into smaller parts with generated quizzes can assist in implementing Mastery Learning environments, or Adaptive Learning technologies. After the data is stored in the system, it can be output to the user in different ways because of the flexibility of software, and new technologies can be leveraged as time goes on with pre-existing educational data, possibly scanned in from raw written course material. In fact, it is almost impossible to predict all of the innovations in this area that Canadians will produce once they are given the skills and direction which is desperately needed.

Although the creation of a general purpose platform (which facilitates easy educational content creation) will be the most effective solution for tackling this issue, desperate short term measures are required. In my view, the most important things to develop first are the following:

  1. A set of online materials and courses which will educate Canadian teachers on evidence based educational technologies and learning environments. A condensed course containing the key educational concepts is also needed, which works will on mobile as well as PC platforms. This will allow our teachers to understand the basics of high quality education, and dispel harmful misconceptions that many teachers currently have (for example, teachers fear that these technologies aim to replace them, when in reality they are meant to empower and assist them, make them more effective at their jobs, and improve their experience teaching students). Of course, these materials can and should be available to all Canadians, as it is their right to understand effective education and what we know about it.
  2. A set of online materials and courses which can be used to effectively teach people basic coding and computation thinking. Again, these courses should be condensed to the core concepts and skills, and should focus on getting the student immediately engaged with the practice of solving problems and coding. Measures should be taken to ensure that these educational experiences are engaging and effective, to ensure that the majority of people can successfully obtain and retain the material. Active learning is extremely important in this area, which leads directly to project based learning (this is one of most effective ways to teach this subject: by having students work on creative projects that involve to their existing areas of interest or expertise, using coding as a tool to accomplish other goals). The content delivered can also be scaled up and down to be useful for elementary schools, high schools, post-secondary, retraining our workforce, as well as any Canadian with access to a mobile device or PC. Just like normal written language, coding and technology literacy can be applied to almost any discipline and is at the heart of innovation, giving citizens the tools to empower themselves, Canada, and ultimately the rest of the world.
  3. There are several other core areas that also need covered such as 21st century skills (including the four Cs), as well as environmental, world issues and personal health education. Basic reading, writing, mathematics and science are also desperately needed in the global community, as well as in a subset of our own population.
  4. Progressive educational policy to spur the development of these educational technologies, as well as their implementation in learning environments. Schools and teachers do not necessarily need to be required to implement the solutions supported by these policies. Instead, educational materials and applications that will educate them of these issues and technologies should be developed, tested and distributed. Incentives might be provided to teachers to accelerate widespread adoption. We should aim to create awareness of these issues and ideas, so that solutions can be developed sooner and more effectively. This is probably a better approach than enforcing solutions onto teachers (even though many are already evidence based), which could cause a negative reaction. If students are informed on these issues as well (based on clear direction proposed by the Canadian government) they will naturally seek the highest quality education available to them. Currently, students are mostly uninformed on these issues, and are usually only seeking to be awarded the best resume qualifications for a high job status. Instead, they could be focusing on finding the right learning environments that will allow them to develop and cultivate useful skills that enable them to provide value for themselves and society. From that foundation, Canadians will be able to pursue their interests more often based on the abundance created by a more digitally progressive society.

 

 

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National youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship celebration event

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 06/30/2016 1467314950
Canadian high school students regularly achieve world-class results in international STEM competitions. In 2015 – and again in 2016 – youn .... Read more

Canadian high school students regularly achieve world-class results in international STEM competitions. In 2015 – and again in 2016 – young Canadians won the top award (and the US$75,000 cash prize) at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), topping 1,700 students from 75 countries. Canadians have won the Sanofi International Biogenius Challenge, FIRST Robotics Competition World Championships, and numerous STEM Olympiad competitions from astronomy to mathematics. Canadians have been top 15 finalists (from over 10,000 global entries) in the Google Science Fair almost every year since it began in 2011 – and won top awards in 2013 and 2014.

Most Canadians – and particularly our youth – are completely unaware. It’s as if our world junior hockey team won and no-one noticed. That doesn’t happen because Canada has a vibrant hockey culture. Thanks to Vancouver 2010 and Own the Podium, we’re developing an Olympic culture. But we need a STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship culture.

As in sports, a STEM culture needs heroes – rising stars that young Canadians recognize and emulate. When 16-year-old Victoria BC inventor Ann Makosinski appeared on the Jimmy Fallon Show with her hand-heat-powered flashlight – and again a year later with a cell phone charging travel mug – kids noticed. Peltier tile-powered devices – many built by girls – appeared at science fairs across Canada. Building a science and innovation culture is no different to building a hockey or Olympic culture; celebrating excellence and achievement on the national stage and in the media is an essential component.

In 2010, U.S. President Obama initiated what became an annual tradition – the White House Science Fair. Over the past six years, this event has celebrated the winners of a broad range of youth STEM and entrepreneurship competitions at what the President has called, “the most fun day of the year.”

I propose creating an annual event, hosted on Parliament Hill, to recognize Canadian winners of national and international youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship competitions and other young Canadian achievers. They would be invited to share their work with the Prime Minister / Minister of Youth, Minister of Science, Key Opinion Leaders, STEM-related government officials, and most importantly, the media.

Most kids aren’t going to become professional or Olympic athletes, but wanting to inspires and motivates. Let’s celebrate Canada’s youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship heroes and role models.

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National Youth Science and Innovation Network

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/27/2016 1469642783
Stimulating interest in and supporting a national network for youth to explore hands-on, project-based science. Canada's response to the technologica .... Read more

Stimulating interest in and supporting a national network for youth to explore hands-on, project-based science.

Canada's response to the technological and space race in the 1960s was the development of local, regional and national opportunities to foster and showcase the innovativeness of youth in science - science fairs. Over five decades, this network - primarily driven by volunteers and teachers - has helped develop some of Canada's (and the world's) leaders in business, research, science and social impact. From Roberta Bondar to Michael Serbinis to Marc Kielburger to Raymond Wang, science fairs have helped shape the impact Canada has on the world.

Investing in a proven program that encourages youth from curiosity through to discovery will ensure Canada's success in innovation, skills development and will creates the nation's future economic leaders.

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Social Innovation of Collaborative Commons - to Complement Rapid Technological Innovation

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 07/10/2016 1468165446
Rapid technological advances are both enabling and driving a shift toward Collaborative Commons (CC) as a socio-economic paradigm of the future (see B .... Read more

Rapid technological advances are both enabling and driving a shift toward Collaborative Commons (CC) as a socio-economic paradigm of the future (see Background below). 

Social innovation, parallel to technological innovation, is needed to

  • Maximize the opportunities and benefits for ALL Canadians from CC
  • Minimize the inevitable disruption to lives during  transition to CC
  • Enable graceful transitional or sustained interplay with existing socio-economic models (as needed)
  • Discover the limits and avoid any pitfalls of CC
  • Engender trust among participants in CC
  • Develop a minimally intrusive Canadian regulatory framework to facilitate the above

To that end, the following is recommended:

  • Increase funding for Collaborative Commons academic research in social sciences and economics with the above objectives.
  • Establish a social entrepreneurship fund to support creation of specifically micro Collaborative Commons, and functional elements of Collaborative Commons.  Evaluate results.
  • Hold national events and competitions in Collaborative Commons innovation.
  • Develop prototype regulations relating to Collaborative Commons and run regulatory pilots to discover what works, before enacting (or not) fully into law.
  • Engage Canadians about Collaborative Commons to gather maximum diversity of ideas and input and generally garner buy-in (or not).
  • Collaborate with like-minded democratic states for additional innovation diversity and synergistic global implementation of Collaborative Commons

Background and Why

Society (and economy) is on the cusp of a dramatic disruption due to exponential rise in technological capability.   Technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and data analytics borne out of radical escalation of compute power, coupled with advances in sensor and communication technologies, and the ubiquity of the Internet have spawned the Internet of Things (IoT).  IoT is resolutely driving us into the Fourth Industrial revolution dominated by cyber-physical systems.  This will not only sharply reduce the need for human labour, it will also increasingly chip away the volume of human intellect and oversight needed.

At the same time, the Web is enabling the sharing economy.  It’s taking hold due to the inherent pull of convenience and cost savings, personal economic necessity, and desire for environmental sustainability.  The latter is also driving the Circular Economy, where materials and energy embedded in end-of-life products are recirculated into new goods and energy.  Both the sharing and circular economies will reduce the total volume of manufactured goods and raw materials needed, again correspondingly reducing the total human labour, intellect and oversight needed.

The double whammy of efficiencies and the reduced need for goods from above will, for many, reduce or eliminate the means for equitable living and ability to retain agency in society and economy.  Under the existing socio-economic paradigms, this concern will only deepen with ongoing technological advancements, further hollowing out the middle class.  The answer is definitely NOT to stall or stop technology.  On the contrary, Canadian technological innovation must forge ahead at full steam to enable us to compete internationally and grow the total national wealth.  However, social innovation must be tapped to enable ALL Canadians to both contribute to and take from the common wealth, and have full societal agency.

Fortunately an emerging “COLLABORATIVE COMMONS” paradigm shows promise as a new socio-economic order – both organically enabled by the Internet of Things, as well as a reaction to its impacts and side effects.  Collaborative Commons (CC) is characterised by open source information, technology and energy; the blurring of consumer vs. producers into prosumers; access to products becoming the norm over product ownership; and rise of the gig economy over traditional employment.  Basically, it’s a society where citizens and organizations openly collaborate to both create common wealth and draw from it.

While ad-hoc CC instances in some sectors are already generating benefits for its constituents, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges going forward.  What are the trade-offs between different CC models and what model(s) work best?  How can trust, which is critical to collaboration, be engendered and supported among participants? What might be some negative side-effects of CC?  How does CC interplay with traditional market economies, what sectors are best suited for CC, and what are the transition timeframes and trade-offs? What regulatory supports are needed to enable, ease transition, and protect against undesired aspects of the CC?  A heavy dose of Social Innovation is needed now to address the unknowns so that civil society can come out whole on the other side of the transition into Collaborative Commons.

This and related topics are skillfully covered by economist Jeremy Rifkin in The Zero Marginal Cost Society, and related works such as The Sharing Economy by Arun Sundararajan, and Makers and Takers by Rana Foroohar.

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Young entrepreneurs

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 06/23/2016 1466687569
Today's youth 10-18 have grown up with technology in their hands.  We need Canadian youth to be producers of this technology not just mere consumers. .... Read more

Today's youth 10-18 have grown up with technology in their hands.  We need Canadian youth to be producers of this technology not just mere consumers.  They need to be attracted and given the rights skills to become problem-solvers using technology.

There is evidence that this is working with Canadian success stories.  Two years ago a team of five girls from the University of Calgary won the prize for innovation in the world's largest tech entrepreneurship contest Technovation. Other cities have also participated:  Ottawa, Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver etc.

This early exposure to critical thinking skills, problem-solving skills and entrepreneurial skills to address local problems with technology is key for today's youth especially young girls, so that they feel empowered to be part of this innovative society we live in and contribute to diverse solutions.

My recommendation is to offer this three-month program - Technovation - (as an optional/spare course) in every school in every city and town and community centre and library so that young women today become tomorrow's innovators. 

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Teach kids to code in under-served areas

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 06/27/2016 1467046085
We are Code Heroes and we are launching a program to teach people of all ages in the region of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, how to code. We have cr .... Read more

We are Code Heroes and we are launching a program to teach people of all ages in the region of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry, how to code. We have created an affordable, fun, and engaging program this summer to bring tech education and digital literacy to areas that are under-served and are doing so as a nonprofit organization. Receiving help from the Government in terms of resources and funding will help us bring innovation and amazing learning opportunities where there are currently no offerings. 

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Centralize and disseminate community information

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 08/23/2016 1471976610
When government departments announce events, initiatives, grants, programs, etc they should submit information into a central database, tagged with us .... Read more

When government departments announce events, initiatives, grants, programs, etc they should submit information into a central database, tagged with user selection filters (eg Heritage,Arts,Science,Aboriginal,Digital,Ontario etc), and dated. Allow Canadians to register and select the tags of interest such that new information is automatically pushed or emailed to interested parties. This way Canadians are proactively informed of news relevant to their needs, instead of finding out by accident, or never, as is most often the case. Searching through myriad government documents scattered over diverse platforms isn't practical. Think Google Alerts system for the Canadian government. Keep us informed EASILY.

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Adopt an inclusive and coordinated approach to innovation programs, across disciplines and communities.

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/02/2016 1472843342
As Minister Bains recently said, “Canada needs a bold, coordinated strategy on innovation that delivers results for all Canadians.” It is .... Read more

As Minister Bains recently said, “Canada needs a bold, coordinated strategy on innovation that delivers results for all Canadians.” It is vital that in 2016, our approach to innovation is both an inclusive and coordinated one. A strategy that benefits only certain regions, industries, or disciplines will be insufficient for innovation leadership.

Without careful planning, the shift towards an increasingly tech-driven, globalized economy may exacerbate existing social disparities. An inclusive approach to innovation will make the most of the skills, qualifications, and ideas held across Canada’s diverse population, and in particular women, Indigenous peoples, and new Canadians.

Canada’s strategy must also promote new partnerships across sectors and borders, while avoiding duplication of efforts. Enhanced collaboration and greater integration among players in Canada’s innovation ecosystem must be a priority if public funds are to be invested as strategically and effectively as possible.

Mitacs supports these objectives by working with provincial, national and international partners across disciplines and sectors to improve Canadian productivity and growth. Our expansive network allows Mitacs’ innovation internships to be integrated into complimentary initiatives, avoiding duplication and presenting a simplified point of access for participants. Specifically, Mitacs has worked to support this coordination through partnerships with organizations like CIHR, SSHRC, NSERC, Genome Canada, NRC-IRAP and many more federally supported entities promoting Canadian innovation.

Finally, an inclusive and coordinated approach must recognize the continued importance of basic research. Mitacs encourages the federal government to support Canada’s granting councils, and to promote basic research at colleges, polytechnics and universities across Canada. Often, basic research leads to new discoveries, and support for untargeted research is important to our innovative future.

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Youth Incubator For Technology Ideas

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 06/24/2016 1466783862
Tags: technology  youth 
From High School kids should be part of hands on skilled base training where they can bring their ideas to life.  Develop courses, training programs .... Read more

From High School kids should be part of hands on skilled base training where they can bring their ideas to life. 

Develop courses, training programs and physical space where their ideas and skills can be groomed and turned into life changes solutions and products. 

In Canada we have failed to develop the Intellectual Property market. In US they got Apple, Microsoft, Google, Facebook and alot of other companies. 

If our youth is equipped with the right tools at the right time, we can be the next Silicon Valley. 

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Access to Talent

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 08/10/2016 1470860628
The talent pool is seen as neither wide nor deep. While talent is less of an issue with MNEs, experienced and networked talent is seen as lacking in .... Read more

The talent pool is seen as neither wide nor deep.

While talent is less of an issue with MNEs, experienced and networked talent is seen as lacking in Canada and a number of CEOs talked about the value to an MNE of people who have worked in a number of countries, have exposure to new and different ways of thinking and doing things (Reference is from OBIO’s latest report “How Canada Should be Engaging in a $9 Trillion Dollar Health Economy” www.obio.ca)

SMEs reported more challenges with finding and retaining the human resources they need. Barriers that were mentioned include Canadian immigration policies, competition from jurisdictions with better financing, less risky companies, lack of incentives and security for employees to join and stay in the industry and lack of support for companies to create jobs and build an experienced workforce.

The report recommends, talent attraction and retention policies or programs to eliminate barriers to immigration and provide direct funding or tax relief for companies to competitively develop experienced personnel.

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Partner up with Ladies Learning Code and School Systems

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/31/2016 1472668094
Tags: technology  education 
Ladies Learning Code is a not-for-profit that runs beginner friendly technology workshops for women and youth. All grades and all schools across Canad .... Read more

Ladies Learning Code is a not-for-profit that runs beginner friendly technology workshops for women and youth. All grades and all schools across Canada should be teaching technology building skills and entrepreneurial basics. Students need to be able to create and think for themselves to be successful in our era of innovation. The days of memorization is gone - we have computers to do that for us.Team up with LLC or other initiatives to bring technology training into the classroom.

Credit: Ladies Learning Code - http://ladieslearningcode.com/

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Instead of funding startups, educate a startup work force

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/02/2016 1472844309
Canada's comparative advantage should rest in our education system, where we can educate the next generation of innovators. While other countries adap .... Read more

Canada's comparative advantage should rest in our education system, where we can educate the next generation of innovators. While other countries adapt to the changing landscape, our educators have remained complacent, looking to government to lead the way on innovation.”

 

“With more than two million students enrolled in Canadian postsecondary institutions every year, our university and college campuses have a far greater opportunity to spur innovation than any government program.”

 

“To compete, our graduates need skills formed in the latest technology programs, which means that universities and colleges need to update their course material and delivery.”

“ We should also subsidize the cost of postsecondary programs that are in highest demand by technology companies. We talk about the need for more engineers and more technical talent, while the price of these degrees is among the most expensive on our campuses. This logic would be dismissed by any student in first-year microeconomics.”

Jeffrey Doucet, Co-founder and chief executive officer of CareerJSM

 Instead of funding startups, educate a startup work force, Globe and Mail. September 2, 2016.

Credit: Jeffrey Doucet, Globe and Mail

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STEM Learning Ecosystem

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/14/2016 1473894497
Cross-sector collaboration of science and technology education providers can result in a "learning ecosystem" with high potential for scaling. See th .... Read more

Cross-sector collaboration of science and technology education providers can result in a "learning ecosystem" with high potential for scaling. See the attached document for details.

Credit: Organizations include UBC, SFU, Genome BC, BC Science Teachers Assn, & the Mitchell Odyssey Fdn.

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Build a learning framework for STEM education - Canada 2067

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 11/15/2016 1479225940
Seventy per cent of the top jobs in Canada today require some STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) skills – and this number i .... Read more

Seventy per cent of the top jobs in Canada today require some STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) skills – and this number is growing every year. That said, less than half of Canadian high school students graduate with senior level science and math courses and only one in five graduate with the prerequisites to pursue engineering.

At Let’s Talk Science, we are committed to helping youth build the competencies they need to become innovators, critical thinkers and problem solvers ready to meet the challenges of an increasingly demanding economy through education in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

STEM learning builds competencies and characteristics that are needed for all jobs – things like critical thinking, problem solving, information management, positive risk taking, resiliency, effective communication and more. As the world rapidly changes, work and citizenship demands will require greater capacity in STEM.

Canada 2067 is our bold new nation-building initiative that will bring Canadians together to develop a STEM learning framework.

With Canada 2067, we are calling on Canadians to join the conversation on STEM education by visiting http://canada2067.ca and filling out our online learning framework questionnaire.

The contributions of Canadians through this initiative will contribute to a STEM learning framework for the next 50 years – and will help us to evolve and strengthen Canada’s education model for the 21st century by enhancing student exposure and access to the STEM disciplines across all levels and areas of learning.

Together, we’ll make sure Canadian youth have the skills they need to face the future with confidence.

 

About Let’s Talk Science: Let's Talk Science is an award-winning national, charitable organization. Over the past twenty years, we have worked with educators to support learning and skill development. We’ve developed hands-on programs for Kindergarten to Grade 12 youth to get them interested in STEM at an early age and keep them engaged as they move through high school. Our goal is to motivate and empower youth to fulfill their potential and prepare for their future careers and roles as citizens.

Credit: Let's Talk Science, Canada 2067

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Finish High School with a Bachelor's Degree - Why Not?

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/17/2016 1476710077
http://wfla.com/2016/10/16/finish-high-school-with-bachelors-degree-at-1-florida-school-yes/   Tuition-free Florida Atlantic University gives smart .... Read more

http://wfla.com/2016/10/16/finish-high-school-with-bachelors-degree-at-1-florida-school-yes/  

Tuition-free Florida Atlantic University gives smart kids a chance to earn a high-school diploma along with a bachelor's degree at the same time.  Why not? Future of public education which blurs the lines between institutions and ideas. Canadian provinces and territories & the federal government should move beyond the educational divide to encourage innovation in education.

Credit: Florida Atlantic University

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