Entrepreneurial and creative society

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Increase Small Business and Youth Grants for Long-Term Media Projects

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 07/06/2016 1467829630
Since this section includes "creative society" as one of the qualifiers, I assume the Government of Canada must understand the benefit of arts and cul .... Read more

Since this section includes "creative society" as one of the qualifiers, I assume the Government of Canada must understand the benefit of arts and culture to society. How that sector can vitalize an economy, improve a community's competitive edge, make communities more attractive to investors and contribute to the development of a skilled workforce.The issue we have in Canada is that there is no incentive for a creative person, outside of national pride, to stay in Canada. Funding is more often than not geared towards established creatives and almost purely towards one-time projects. Small business and youth funding is directed almost exclusively to more secure and safer sectors.By encouraging investment in and funding actual businesses in the arts and culture sector the government of Canada would be making Canada a more attractive place to reside for everyone. On top of that a strong arts and culture sector attracts skilled workers of all stripes; from technically skilled workers to lawyers and investors.While there may be funding available in certain Canadian cities, there is also funding available in cultural centres like San Francisco and New York. If a young entrepreneur is seeking to start a business and are given the option of Ottawa or New York, they will often choose the latter at least in part because of the exciting culture that city has to offer.On top of that creativity is contagious. If a tech community is nestled against an enthused, vibrant arts community they will be more likely to take chances on innovation and gain the inspiration to think outside the box.

While we invest in the arts and culture sector currently it is largely on one-off projects. These projects don't give us the same economic benefit as long-term businesses. They do not attract investors or workers. They serve to highlight Canadian talent but won't create a self-sustaining community that generates revenue. Businesses such as production companies, galleries, publications, festivals, websites, increased funding for TV shows and other long-term projects should gain priority.When investors or workers choose to leave Canada or choose another country for investing, whether subconsciously or not, the choice often comes down to one word: boring. There is a clear cure for this; investment in businesses in arts and culture that have long-term potential.

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To be known globally, one must act globally.

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 08/18/2016 1471551382
In order to be known globally, one must act globally. Sheridan’s Faculty of Animation, Arts and Design has committed to interacting with the int .... Read more

In order to be known globally, one must act globally. Sheridan’s Faculty of Animation, Arts and Design has committed to interacting with the international academic and artistic communities. We host international conferences, recruit the top students and faculty internationally, partner with international practitioners on our productions in Animation, Music Theatre, Design and the like. By acting in an international environment, we raise the bar for our Faculty. We better learn to measure success and failure by acting within an international context. However, these activities need constant funding and resourcing for ongoing institutional commitments.

Credit: Sheridan Faculty of Animation, Arts and Design

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To be known globally, one must act globally.

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 08/18/2016 1471551386
In order to be known globally, one must act globally. Sheridan’s Faculty of Animation, Arts and Design has committed to interacting with the int .... Read more

In order to be known globally, one must act globally. Sheridan’s Faculty of Animation, Arts and Design has committed to interacting with the international academic and artistic communities. We host international conferences, recruit the top students and faculty internationally, partner with international practitioners on our productions in Animation, Music Theatre, Design and the like. By acting in an international environment, we raise the bar for our Faculty. We better learn to measure success and failure by acting within an international context. However, these activities need constant funding and resourcing for ongoing institutional commitments.

Credit: Sheridan Faculty of Animation, Arts and Design

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The Maker's Economy

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 08/21/2016 1471816959
Tags: Business  innovation  arts 
The Maker's economy is to my mind a sort of micro business economy. Rather than being defined by a job, a maker is someone who perhaps works a job, bu .... Read more

The Maker's economy is to my mind a sort of micro business economy. Rather than being defined by a job, a maker is someone who perhaps works a job, but also pursues a creative passion that they're bringing to market.

But a maker of what? Technology is moving so fast that you can invent a craft for yourself.

An illustrator making show posters for local bands, and also making their own greeting cards for sale in cafes and bookshops in their community would know this. It's a short staircase from that to self publishing graphic novels, children's books, and board-games; each a passion project, but also a product. With a bit of guidance, these products can form the basis for a business.

This economy is already happening in bedrooms and home offices, but could entice more to join it if there was a place that facilitated some of this learning. As it is now, those that are part of this economy are self taught, self-motivated creators with a working understanding of social media and where things are going next. That's a smaller segment of society, but they're also a built in trainer base - going around tutorializing their work for the internet at large. So much of their audience are encouraged to try now after seeing it demonstrated online, but don't necessarily have the equipment to try.

What's needed to facilitate this is a dynamic laboratory space that's open for use to the public of all ages. A place where someone can walk in and say "I've heard about this thing where you get to do X, but I have no idea where to begin." A workshop space, where a video journalist can give a few pointers to aspiring vloggers, or a social media expert can discuss the new species of marketing that continue to evolve month by month. A place where hardware resides that you can use to bridge the gaps between your ideas and the market.

Credit: PCNA, Pacific Community Networks Association

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Collaborations, partnerships and innovation for impact

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 09/19/2016 1474313214
Canada is not currently a leader in the social entrepreneurship space. As with all types of entrepreneurship, Canadian policies and programs must exis .... Read more

Canada is not currently a leader in the social entrepreneurship space. As with all types of entrepreneurship, Canadian policies and programs must exist to incent investment in entrepreneurial projects, including those that address issues of social importance. Organizations that are applying or contributing their resources to help make a positive social impact and those that contribute to building innovative solutions should be incented and rewarded for doing so.

 

While the video game industry exists primarily to create entertainment products, a number of the innovations developed in the sector can, and have, been utilized to advance research and innovation in other sectors, including health, which have a profound social impact. In essence, the tools developed for entertainment now have serious applications in robotics, sports, physical and mental health treatments (to manage anxiety disorders, depression, grief and PTSD with war veterans).

 

A recent example is the collaborations between Ubisoft Montreal, McGill University, and Amblyotech to tackle the problem of amblyopia, or more commonly known as “lazy-eye.” The condition affects three per cent of children internationally and occurs when the brain favours one eye over the other. The inspired video game Dig Rush, played on a tablet with 3D glasses encourages active focusing and is thought to be five times more effective than the current treatment option of eye-patching.

 

As a driver of social innovation, games have served as invaluable tools in education, helping kids and adults learn the skills needed to participate in the innovation economy. Today, Canada can also boast an active group of academics playing a role in pushing the boundaries of games to new areas. The University of Waterloo’s Games Institute is using games research and technology and applying them to non-game situations, a practice commonly known as gamification.

 

The Games Institute is working with partners such as FlourishiQ to research games and gamification techniques to engage the users of the company’s wearable device in establishing daily insights on wellness data, sleep and other physiological data that can be monitored to improve quality of life. Gamification techniques are being used in games to help users find safe spaces in urban environments while another game, Spirit 50, incentivizes exercise for older adults as they engage with technology. The UpSWinG project in development with collaborators at McGill University use game techniques to engage policy stakeholders in solutions for improving sustainable water governance.

 

If Canada is to remain a leader in innovation, more must be done to focus our efforts on building up the resource that is primarily responsible for innovation — talent/labour. There already exists a global race to drive innovation forward by obtaining the best and brightest talent. to drive innovation forward and create the products and services that change the way we live, work and play. We need to ensure that our industries and University have the policy tools needed to compete on this truly global battleground. The ability to lay claim to those innovators is the only way to compete with other innovation nations around the world. Canada must develop an immigration framework that allows the seamless and efficient movement of highly skilled workers in the technology fields.

 

But targeted immigration isn’t enough. A domestic digital skills training strategy is also key to our continued success. How countries arm their future workers with the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) skills to compete in a global and innovation driven economy will mark the difference between a country that falls behind and a country that prospers and thrives.

 

Other jurisdictions, like the United Kingdom, France and the US already have substantial infrastructure and frameworks to support social entrepreneurship and innovation including policies, legislation, funding and programming, which is available to all sizes of companies and individuals at various stages in their careers that engage in social entrepreneurship, whether directly or indirectly.

 

We encourage the Government to review global solutions in place at present, and consider ways to learn from the strengths of these programs to create and implement a diverse set of programs, incentives and opportunities for Canadians and companies in Canada to innovate and contribute to advancing socially impactful innovations across all sectors and communities.

Credit: Entertainment Software Association of Canada

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Start early, create engagement opportunities, inspire curiosity & create an innovation ecosystem in schools, communities and at home

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/19/2016 1474315644
Collaboration by all stakeholders is key to ensuring that youth are equipped with the right skills for the future economy. By today’s definition .... Read more

Collaboration by all stakeholders is key to ensuring that youth are equipped with the right skills for the future economy. By today’s definition, the skills we think are relevant and the way that we define education and curriculum will likely look quite different in 10 or 20 years if we are committed to developing these key skills for success. For example, education may include:

  • experiential learning opportunities (e.g. virtual reality simulations or simulated real-life workplace scenarios);
  • integration of digital skills learning opportunities across subject matters (versus a siloed approach with singular classes for specific digital topics like “coding” or “digital skills”);
  • interaction with companies that have expertise and business acumen to share with children and youth;

each of these, as well as other new opportunities, will be critical. Of equal importance, is offering engagement opportunities that pique the curiosity and ignite the inner-innovator in children as early as 4 and 5 years of age. Experiences in the UK, Sweden and other parts of the world have shown that this can be done through activities that develop computing logic skills and may require teams to solve tough challenges (e.g. http://www.digitalschoolhouse.org.uk/), or may include programming or building something (e.g. the BBC microbit project: https://www.microbit.co.uk/). In all cases, the key is to offer options that are engaging, challenging and fun to help kids get started on a path that will help them succeed in the future. We need to ensure that in terms of education we are constantly evaluating the material being taught and the delivery model. Work needs to be done to ensure buy in from the parents, students, educators and government. An important piece is ensuring that Canadians understand the shifting landscape and why certain skills are more important today than ever before. By setting a clear framework with defined objectives this will help build awareness of the value of these skills and also provide a measuring stick to ensure progress.

 

Many of our member companies have also expressed that while young graduates are engaged in co-ops and internships, they still seem to lack the general business skills required to grow into leadership positions. Deeper collaboration and consultation on curriculum and programs between training organizations, including elementary, secondary and post-secondary institutions may help to facilitate the reduction of this skills gap in new employees and better prepare students for the work force.

 

Certainly students in secondary school start considering what they want to do for work when they “grow up”, but these skills are not reserved solely for secondary school and can be introduced very early on in simple ways. One example of an organization championing this new approach is Alt School, a US based private school (https://www.altschool.com/). We encourage the government to consider how to support and inspire new learning opportunities for children, youth, and their families that are engaging, dynamic and equally supported by the provinces.

 

To start this process we would recommend the Government consider further collaboration with the provinces to establish a national skills strategy that incents and rewards provincial innovation in education.

Credit: The Entertainment Software Association of Canada

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Whole Girl, Whole World through Digital Filmmaking

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/23/2016 1474645330
Digital filmmaking has become more pervasive than ever in all areas of life. The influential broadcasting quality of the film medium is apparent on vi .... Read more

Digital filmmaking has become more pervasive than ever in all areas of life. The influential broadcasting quality of the film medium is apparent on virtual platforms like YouTube, where millions of young people view independent films every day. With this distribution power, young women’s perspectives can impact their families, peers, communities, and the world.

Credit: Chantal Drolet

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L’idée de l’UDA : créer davantage de synergies entre les artistes et la société civile, notamment dans la sphère socioéconomique.

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 10/04/2016 1475609854
Tags: culture  arts 
La culture est une force. Et ce principe est encore renforcé par l’idée que les arts doivent être considérés comme un élément clé d&rsqu .... Read more

La culture est une force. Et ce principe est encore renforcé par l’idée que les arts doivent être considérés comme un élément clé d’attractivité d’un territoire et de sa vitalité économique.

L’apport d’une scène artistique locale à la société crée une émulation et une synergie qui dépassent les frontières de la culture. Vous voulez mesurer la vitalité créative d’une société ? Surveillez la vitalité de la scène artistique.

En 2015, une étude actualisée de la Chambre de commerce du Montréal métropolitain sur la culture à Montréal évaluait que les retombées économiques annuelles totales (directes et indirectes) pour 2013 du secteur de la culture étaient estimées à près de 11 milliards de dollars. La contribution directe à l’économie était de 7,4 milliards de dollars, soit environ 6 % du PIB de Montréal. C’est considérable.

Les répondants à un sondage réalisé par Léger pour l’UDA affirment à 65 % que les arts et la culture apportent une contribution économique significative à la société québécoise.

Les économistes ont même un mot pour parler des facteurs qui rendent un territoire attirant : les externalités. Et de plus en plus de recherches établissent un lien entre la présence d’infrastructures et d’initiatives culturelles dans les centres urbains et leur capacité à attirer le capital humain.

La forte présence et le dynamisme du secteur culturel dans une ville contribuent à créer un cercle vertueux. Plus le secteur culturel est présent, plus on réussit à attirer une main-d’œuvre qualifiée et mobile. Et plus on réussit à attirer des investissements privés en raison de la présence d’une masse critique de travailleurs qualifiés. De même, les arts et la culture peuvent contribuer à la revitalisation de zones urbaines, comme ce fut le cas pour le quartier Saint-Roch à Québec ou le Quartier des spectacles à Montréal.

Si, comme l’affirme le premier ministre Justin Trudeau, « notre principale richesse n’est pas sous nos pieds, mais entre nos oreilles », « les industries culturelles représentent un secteur clé de l’économie, et la rencontre des arts, des sciences et de la technologie offre des possibilités sans fin d’innovation et de résolution des problèmes. L’investissement dans le secteur culturel contribue à créer des emplois et à renforcer l’économie, en plus de garantir que notre point de vue unique est présenté au monde entier » (Budget du Canada, 2016).

Ainsi, la présence d’un pôle de compétitivité dans le domaine des arts et de la culture favorise l’essaimage d’entreprises dans d’autres secteurs d’activité. Les exemples sont nombreux, tant au Québec qu’ailleurs au Canada.

Dans le dictionnaire, on définit la créativité comme le pouvoir d’invention et d’imagination ; et on définit l’innovation comme l’action d’introduire de la nouveauté dans un domaine. Au quotidien, on utilise souvent l’expression anglaise « to think outside the box». « Penser à l’extérieur de la boite », ça s’apprend. C’est ce que les artistes ont appris et apprennent en continu. Être créatifs, c’est inscrit dans notre ADN !

Développement durable, santé publique, énergie, nouvelles technologies, médecine, physique quantique. Tous les secteurs cherchent des talents qui démontrent leur capacité à faire preuve de créativité et d’imagination.

Qui est l'UDA et qui sont les artistes qu'elle représente?

Fondée en 1937, l’Union des artistes (UDA) est un syndicat professionnel représentant près de 13 060 artistes, dont environ 8 440 membres actifs et 4 620 stagiaires, regroupés au sein de quatre catégories : acteurs, chanteurs, animateurs et danseurs. Ils exercent leur métier dans plusieurs disciplines. Ils sont artistes de variétés, comédiens, chanteurs lyriques, cascadeurs, choristes, directeurs de plateau, humoristes, annonceurs et chorégraphes pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns.

L’UDA représente les artistes professionnels œuvrant en français au Québec et ailleurs au Canada, de même que tous les artistes œuvrant dans une autre langue que le français sauf dans une production faite et exécutée en anglais et destinée principalement à un public de langue anglaise. À ce titre, l’UDA est reconnue en vertu de la Loi sur le statut professionnel et les conditions d’engagement des artistes de la scène, du disque et du cinéma (loi provinciale promulguée en 1987) et accréditée en vertu de la Loi concernant le statut de l’artiste et régissant les relations professionnelles entre artistes et producteurs au Canada (loi fédérale promulguée en 1992). 

La mission de l’UDA : défendre les intérêts sociaux, économiques et moraux de ses membres, qui sont pour la majorité des travailleurs autonomes. Au cœur de ses activités : négocier des conditions minimales de travail et de rémunération des artistes dans les secteurs de sa compétence et assurer le respect des ententes collectives.  

L’UDA est membre de Compétence Culture, le comité sectoriel de main-d’œuvre du secteur de la culture, ainsi que de la Coalition pour la diversité culturelle (CDC). L’UDA est aussi affiliée à la Fédération internationale des acteurs (FIA).

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L’idée de l’UDA : Les arts doivent être considérés comme un élément clé de l’éducation et faire partie intégrante de l’enseignement.

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/04/2016 1475610250
Tags: culture  arts 
La culture est une force. Les arts et la culture sont au cœur du développement chez les jeunes d’une attitude créative et de compétence .... Read more

La culture est une force. Les arts et la culture sont au cœur du développement chez les jeunes d’une attitude créative et de compétences essentielles dans une économie du savoir et de l’innovation.

La construction de l’identité culturelle et du sentiment d’appartenance à la société commence à l’école. On y apprend une langue et des références communes qui façonnent notre vision du monde et notre capacité à comprendre notre environnement et à y contribuer.

Non seulement l’éducation artistique contribue au développement personnel des élèves qui explorent leur créativité, mais elle les aide à trouver le mode de pensée qui leur convient avec pour résultat des progrès dans les autres disciplines comme les mathématiques ou la rédaction.

Pour encourager la persévérance scolaire

De nombreuses études le démontrent, nos partenaires enseignants et chercheurs en témoignent fréquemment, la pratique des arts, comme celle des sports, contribue à la motivation des élèves, à leur assiduité et à leur valorisation. C’est à ce jour le meilleur programme de persévérance scolaire qu’on ait à notre disposition. Nous vous invitons à lire à ce sujet les recherches produites par la firme canadienne Hill Stratégies qui ont, entre autres, analysé les données de méta-analyse sur des expériences réalisées dans plusieurs pays, dont l’Angleterre, l’Australie et les États-Unis. On y apprend que, au secondaire, le taux de décrochage atteint à peine 4 % chez les élèves initiés aux arts, contre 22 % chez ceux qui en ont été privés. La tendance se vérifie par la suite alors que deux fois plus d’élèves exposés aux arts obtiennent un diplôme et que 18 % d’entre eux obtiendront un baccalauréat, contre à peine 6 % dans le groupe des élèves qui n’ont pas eu cette chance. La pratique des arts semble même faire diminuer les disparités de réussite scolaire entre des groupes plus ou moins favorisés.

Pour le développement des compétences et de la créativité

On le constate, de façon plus large, la pratique des arts contribue au développement des compétences de générations d’élèves et cela se reflète jusque dans leur parcours professionnel. Est-ce que d’avoir joué au théâtre à l’école a de la valeur dans le CV d’un ingénieur ? Sans doute pas. Mais d’avoir ouvert son esprit à la créativité aura un impact sur son approche des défis qu’il aura à relever tout au long de sa carrière.

Pour que les arts demeurent au cœur de notre identité

L’intégration des arts dans l’enseignement a d’autres vertus. Bien entendu, elle encourage l’émergence de la vocation des futurs artistes. Mais elle contribue également au développement des publics de demain et à la consolidation de notre identité culturelle en tant que citoyens dans un pays composé d’identités multiples et de cultures riches, qu’elles s’expriment en français, en anglais ou dans l’une des nombreuses langues autochtones.

L’éveil aux différentes formes artistiques et le plaisir qu’on y trouve comme jeune public se répercuteront dans nos choix comme consommateurs dans notre vie adulte et plus tard comme parents et comme citoyens. Fréquenter le théâtre jeunesse, pratiquer les arts plastiques ou jouer dans l’orchestre de l’école nous amènera à être curieux de l’offre artistique, une fois devenus adultes. Les arts sous toutes leurs formes y gagneront, qu’ils s’offrent sur scène, en bibliothèques, au musée, dans les maisons de la culture, dans les galeries, en librairie, au cinéma ou sur toutes les plateformes numériques possibles et imaginables.

Alors que nos artistes affrontent une concurrence de plus en plus vive, que ce soit de la part de créateurs de partout dans le monde ou de la part d’autres formes de loisirs comme les jeux vidéo, nous devons stimuler l’intérêt et créer un appétit pour les œuvres qui viennent de notre propre terreau culturel pour ce qu’elles ont de spécifique et d’universel.

L’exposition des élèves aux arts, aux artistes, à la création et à la culture sous toutes ses formes se fait en encourageant un double mouvement : faire plus de place aux arts dans les classes et amener les élèves à la rencontre de la création dans des espaces consacrés aux arts et à la culture.

Qui est l'UDA et qui sont les artistes qu'elle représente?

Fondée en 1937, l’Union des artistes (UDA) est un syndicat professionnel représentant près de 13 060 artistes, dont environ 8 440 membres actifs et 4 620 stagiaires, regroupés au sein de quatre catégories : acteurs, chanteurs, animateurs et danseurs. Ils exercent leur métier dans plusieurs disciplines. Ils sont artistes de variétés, comédiens, chanteurs lyriques, cascadeurs, choristes, directeurs de plateau, humoristes, annonceurs et chorégraphes pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns.

L’UDA représente les artistes professionnels œuvrant en français au Québec et ailleurs au Canada, de même que tous les artistes œuvrant dans une autre langue que le français sauf dans une production faite et exécutée en anglais et destinée principalement à un public de langue anglaise. À ce titre, l’UDA est reconnue en vertu de la Loi sur le statut professionnel et les conditions d’engagement des artistes de la scène, du disque et du cinéma (loi provinciale promulguée en 1987) et accréditée en vertu de la Loi concernant le statut de l’artiste et régissant les relations professionnelles entre artistes et producteurs au Canada (loi fédérale promulguée en 1992). 

La mission de l’UDA : défendre les intérêts sociaux, économiques et moraux de ses membres, qui sont pour la majorité des travailleurs autonomes. Au cœur de ses activités : négocier des conditions minimales de travail et de rémunération des artistes dans les secteurs de sa compétence et assurer le respect des ententes collectives.  

L’UDA est membre de Compétence Culture, le comité sectoriel de main-d’œuvre du secteur de la culture, ainsi que de la Coalition pour la diversité culturelle (CDC). L’UDA est aussi affiliée à la Fédération internationale des acteurs (FIA).

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Self Publishing as a Viable and Growing Industry

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 10/06/2016 1475788142
Canadian Council for the Arts should start thinking about the changing publishing industry and the new roles and responsiblities that are arising. Fo .... Read more

Canadian Council for the Arts should start thinking about the changing publishing industry and the new roles and responsiblities that are arising.

For writers there is a definite shift from traditional publishing to self-publishing. Even if the author is being traditionally published, there is more and more of an oness being placed on the author to promote and market.

Self publishing is no longer that nether region where hacks hang out on the fringes. Canada has a real opportunity here to support upcoming self-publishers and really put Canada on the map as a new Mecca for self-publishing. We have all of the tools to help these people. We just need to implement them.

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Tax incentives for individual innovators

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 10/27/2016 1477539031
From the airplane and the liquid-propellant rocket, to modern computers, software and social media, many of the technologies that have shaped and cont .... Read more

From the airplane and the liquid-propellant rocket, to modern computers, software and social media, many of the technologies that have shaped and continue to shape our modern world have been the result of individuals, amateurs, and small groups of enthusiasts, often working in their spare time with extremely limited resources, rather than as part of a company.  

Not only does the work of such individuals sometimes lead to significant new technologies and viable companies, it also provides them an unmatched opportunity to develop their own creativity, skills and expertise in a hands-on way that can be of immense benefit in helping them to succeed and contribute to Canada’s economy. 

That success may come directly as a result of an idea they are working on, but it can equally come indirectly, as a result of the experience they have gained and the skills they have developed.  Such self-motivated innovation and experimentation can thus be both a means of developing talent and a means of encouraging innovative work that could lead to new products or companies.  

Yet they tend to face significant obstacles and there tends to be very little support available to them to pursue such work.  If those individuals are only able to pursue their work in their spare time, they may not have the means of incorporating a company and gaining access to the incentives that are available to businesses.

One way the government could lend its support to such self-motivated innovators would be through tax incentives, for example allowing any investments they make related to their innovative activities to be tax-deductible against their primary income, if they do not happen to have their own profitable business to claim it against.  If the costs they incur, for example purchasing a tool or piece of equipment, buying parts to build a prototype or proof-of-concept, taking a relevant course or joining a “hackerspace”, could be used as a deduction against their primary income, this would serve as one practical incentive to encourage and aid them in the pursuit of their work, and would help promote the idea that individuals who take the initiative to engage in their own innovative work and hands-on skills development are actively supporting Canada’s innovative economy and should be encouraged to do so.  

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Egg Seat

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 11/24/2016 1480007383
Tags: arts 
I designed the minimal seat staff like Egg. the body is compact plastic same egg shape and for stable on flat have round black shape and for seating .... Read more

I designed the minimal seat staff like Egg.

the body is compact plastic same egg shape and for stable on flat have round black shape and for seating have yellow foam too.

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