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Young entrepreneurs

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 06/23/2016 1466687569
Today's youth 10-18 have grown up with technology in their hands.  We need Canadian youth to be producers of this technology not just mere consumers. .... Read more

Today's youth 10-18 have grown up with technology in their hands.  We need Canadian youth to be producers of this technology not just mere consumers.  They need to be attracted and given the rights skills to become problem-solvers using technology.

There is evidence that this is working with Canadian success stories.  Two years ago a team of five girls from the University of Calgary won the prize for innovation in the world's largest tech entrepreneurship contest Technovation. Other cities have also participated:  Ottawa, Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver etc.

This early exposure to critical thinking skills, problem-solving skills and entrepreneurial skills to address local problems with technology is key for today's youth especially young girls, so that they feel empowered to be part of this innovative society we live in and contribute to diverse solutions.

My recommendation is to offer this three-month program - Technovation - (as an optional/spare course) in every school in every city and town and community centre and library so that young women today become tomorrow's innovators. 

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EhappyPedia: une enclyclopédie de bonheur

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 06/23/2016 1466693732
Voici un inspirant projet canadien d'envergure mondiale qui répond à la question de l'entreprenariat: Article Radio Canada: http://www.rcinet.ca/f .... Read more

Voici un inspirant projet canadien d'envergure mondiale qui répond à la question de l'entreprenariat:

Article Radio Canada: http://www.rcinet.ca/fr/2016/06/16/bakhoa-nguyen-ehappypedia-pour-changer-le-monde-une-parcelle-de-bonheur-a-la-fois/

Donnez une attention médiatique à de tel projet et encouragez d'autres entrepreneurs à lui faire compétition. Partager un rêve et surprendre tout le monde avec des idées innovatrices est la nature même des entrepreneurs.

Le besoin est d'avantage d'inspirer et de pousser l'entrepreneur à réaliser son projet et à tester le terrain plutôt que d'essayer de le cadrer et lui éviter des erreurs. Les erreurs et les échecs n'ont pas la même signification pour les entrepreneurs... ils n'arrêteront devant rien si leur idée est claire.

Étant mariée à un entrepreneur né, j'ai appris à le supporter les hauts et les bas. Tant qu'il y a encore de l'espoir, les bas ne sont que des opportunnités pour rebondir plus fort. Ce ne sont pas des beaux mots, c'est la réalité des entrepreneurs.

Lam Tra Nien Vo, Bch en ingénerie

T:514.743.5094

 

 

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National youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship celebration event

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 06/30/2016 1467314950
Canadian high school students regularly achieve world-class results in international STEM competitions. In 2015 – and again in 2016 – youn .... Read more

Canadian high school students regularly achieve world-class results in international STEM competitions. In 2015 – and again in 2016 – young Canadians won the top award (and the US$75,000 cash prize) at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), topping 1,700 students from 75 countries. Canadians have won the Sanofi International Biogenius Challenge, FIRST Robotics Competition World Championships, and numerous STEM Olympiad competitions from astronomy to mathematics. Canadians have been top 15 finalists (from over 10,000 global entries) in the Google Science Fair almost every year since it began in 2011 – and won top awards in 2013 and 2014.

Most Canadians – and particularly our youth – are completely unaware. It’s as if our world junior hockey team won and no-one noticed. That doesn’t happen because Canada has a vibrant hockey culture. Thanks to Vancouver 2010 and Own the Podium, we’re developing an Olympic culture. But we need a STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship culture.

As in sports, a STEM culture needs heroes – rising stars that young Canadians recognize and emulate. When 16-year-old Victoria BC inventor Ann Makosinski appeared on the Jimmy Fallon Show with her hand-heat-powered flashlight – and again a year later with a cell phone charging travel mug – kids noticed. Peltier tile-powered devices – many built by girls – appeared at science fairs across Canada. Building a science and innovation culture is no different to building a hockey or Olympic culture; celebrating excellence and achievement on the national stage and in the media is an essential component.

In 2010, U.S. President Obama initiated what became an annual tradition – the White House Science Fair. Over the past six years, this event has celebrated the winners of a broad range of youth STEM and entrepreneurship competitions at what the President has called, “the most fun day of the year.”

I propose creating an annual event, hosted on Parliament Hill, to recognize Canadian winners of national and international youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship competitions and other young Canadian achievers. They would be invited to share their work with the Prime Minister / Minister of Youth, Minister of Science, Key Opinion Leaders, STEM-related government officials, and most importantly, the media.

Most kids aren’t going to become professional or Olympic athletes, but wanting to inspires and motivates. Let’s celebrate Canada’s youth STEM, innovation, and entrepreneurship heroes and role models.

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Prediction innovation:Accuracy and possibilities

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 07/01/2016 1467332184
A designed study need to be done to better predict what the future will bring us of new innovations and technologies.let us consider the current time .... Read more

A designed study need to be done to better predict what the future will bring us of new innovations and technologies.let us consider the current time a Zero start point.letu go back 5p years back and see the stand of technologies science and innovations.let us predict from the Zero start point moving forward 50 years and see what likely to be.let us analyze both datas by finding a group of creterias that are predictable.We will be more equipped to predict with more certainty and less errors.

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National youth STEM and innovation development system - like hockey

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/02/2016 1467490212
Studies over the past 15 years have shown that about two-thirds of Canadian kids ages 12-18 think STEM is important, interesting, and fun. Canadian st .... Read more

Studies over the past 15 years have shown that about two-thirds of Canadian kids ages 12-18 think STEM is important, interesting, and fun. Canadian students rank in the top 10 of 65 OECD countries on international tests of science achievement. Our kids like, and are good at STEM.

Yet, despite this potential, only about 30% of Canadian high school students take STEM courses after grade 10, limiting their access to opportunities in STEM-related fields. No surprise that in 2014 the Canadian Council of Academies (CCA) reported that Canada’s total employment in STEM occupations was just 30% – 22nd out of 37 countries. Do our kids just lose interest in high school? Perhaps, but then how do we explain that 93% of Canadian adults are very or moderately interested in new scientific discoveries and technological developments (1st out of 33 countries), or that 32% visited a science centre/museum in the previous year (2nd out of 39 countries) – according to the same CCA report.

We’re good at getting Canadian kids interested in STEM. Over 100 organizations and institutions, from local to national, offer school presentations, workshops, camps, experiences, challenges, and competitions. They reach a huge number of students, but the percentage of high school students taking STEM courses has remained stubbornly around 30% for years. Canada has no lack of STEM promotion programs – we lack a national strategy and coordination.

PromoScience, through NSERC, provides federal funding for many of these programs – $4.8M over 3 years to 43 organizations in 2015. Grants are awarded through a peer-review process; however, there’s no analysis for redundancy, imbalances, and gaps – or even a program inventory to analyze. As a result, there’s no strategy underlying this funding, or benchmarks to measure progress; the best-written proposals get funded.

Canada produces great hockey players – and now Olympic athletes – because we have a development system. It starts by getting lots of young kids participating for fun. From there, those with ability and passion (and/or ‘enthusiastic’ parents) progress through a series of levels that build skills and identify top prospects. Canada has lots of Timbits-type STEM programs, but no system to guide those kids or parents when they ask, “What’s next?”

I propose that Canada build on its excellent STEM promotion capacity to establish a national youth STEM and innovation development system, similar to those for sports, to cultivate not only interest and excitement, but engagement, skills, and excellence. A national youth STEM and innovation advisory panel – leaders from the national youth STEM and innovation organizations; representatives of regional, provincial, and local organizations; and young Canadians – should be appointed to guide the process. They would start by building a national inventory of programs and then analyze to identify systemic strengths and weaknesses, recommend targets, and evaluate progress.

If we’re serious about developing youth with skills for the future economy, let’s get Canada’s youth STEM promotion organizations working together, rather than competing with each other for funding and profile. It works for hockey.

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More free support and communities like rockmybizplan.ca

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/04/2016 1467662341
By giving young people easy access to expertise, guidance, coaching and peer communities with other entrepreneurs, we set people up for taking more ac .... Read more

By giving young people easy access to expertise, guidance, coaching and peer communities with other entrepreneurs, we set people up for taking more action on their ideas. 

British Columbia is leading the charge in this regard with Futurpreneur Canada's free Rock My Business Plan series throughout the province (in partnership with the Provincial Government and RBC). http://rockmybizplan.ca

 

 

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Promote financial literacy and the development of entrepreneurial skills

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/07/2016 1467918873
Support and encourage pan-Canada adoption of promising provincial practices to promote financial literacy and the development of entrepreneurial ski .... Read more
  • Support and encourage pan-Canada adoption of promising provincial practices to promote financial literacy and the development of entrepreneurial skills.
  • Use federal resources to promote and support entrepreneurship as a viable career path and to encourage related skills development.

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Hands-on entrepreneurship experience

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/07/2016 1467919208
Tags: entrepreneurs 
Create more competitions and other opportunities for aspiring entrepreneurs to gain hands-on experience and exposure to entrepreneurship and to make .... Read more
  • Create more competitions and other opportunities for aspiring entrepreneurs to gain hands-on experience and exposure to entrepreneurship and to make connections.
  • Expand no- or low-risk opportunities for students to experience hands-on entrepreneurship in class, in extra-curricular activities (e.g. a Lemonade Stand app where users create and manage their own lemonade stand business, Junior Achievement-type opportunities to build or sell a product, bringing Startup Weekends into schools), and through high school community service hours (e.g. allow hours with start-up businesses, social enterprises and entrepreneurs to qualify).

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Social Innovation of Collaborative Commons - to Complement Rapid Technological Innovation

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 07/10/2016 1468165446
Rapid technological advances are both enabling and driving a shift toward Collaborative Commons (CC) as a socio-economic paradigm of the future (see B .... Read more

Rapid technological advances are both enabling and driving a shift toward Collaborative Commons (CC) as a socio-economic paradigm of the future (see Background below). 

Social innovation, parallel to technological innovation, is needed to

  • Maximize the opportunities and benefits for ALL Canadians from CC
  • Minimize the inevitable disruption to lives during  transition to CC
  • Enable graceful transitional or sustained interplay with existing socio-economic models (as needed)
  • Discover the limits and avoid any pitfalls of CC
  • Engender trust among participants in CC
  • Develop a minimally intrusive Canadian regulatory framework to facilitate the above

To that end, the following is recommended:

  • Increase funding for Collaborative Commons academic research in social sciences and economics with the above objectives.
  • Establish a social entrepreneurship fund to support creation of specifically micro Collaborative Commons, and functional elements of Collaborative Commons.  Evaluate results.
  • Hold national events and competitions in Collaborative Commons innovation.
  • Develop prototype regulations relating to Collaborative Commons and run regulatory pilots to discover what works, before enacting (or not) fully into law.
  • Engage Canadians about Collaborative Commons to gather maximum diversity of ideas and input and generally garner buy-in (or not).
  • Collaborate with like-minded democratic states for additional innovation diversity and synergistic global implementation of Collaborative Commons

Background and Why

Society (and economy) is on the cusp of a dramatic disruption due to exponential rise in technological capability.   Technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and data analytics borne out of radical escalation of compute power, coupled with advances in sensor and communication technologies, and the ubiquity of the Internet have spawned the Internet of Things (IoT).  IoT is resolutely driving us into the Fourth Industrial revolution dominated by cyber-physical systems.  This will not only sharply reduce the need for human labour, it will also increasingly chip away the volume of human intellect and oversight needed.

At the same time, the Web is enabling the sharing economy.  It’s taking hold due to the inherent pull of convenience and cost savings, personal economic necessity, and desire for environmental sustainability.  The latter is also driving the Circular Economy, where materials and energy embedded in end-of-life products are recirculated into new goods and energy.  Both the sharing and circular economies will reduce the total volume of manufactured goods and raw materials needed, again correspondingly reducing the total human labour, intellect and oversight needed.

The double whammy of efficiencies and the reduced need for goods from above will, for many, reduce or eliminate the means for equitable living and ability to retain agency in society and economy.  Under the existing socio-economic paradigms, this concern will only deepen with ongoing technological advancements, further hollowing out the middle class.  The answer is definitely NOT to stall or stop technology.  On the contrary, Canadian technological innovation must forge ahead at full steam to enable us to compete internationally and grow the total national wealth.  However, social innovation must be tapped to enable ALL Canadians to both contribute to and take from the common wealth, and have full societal agency.

Fortunately an emerging “COLLABORATIVE COMMONS” paradigm shows promise as a new socio-economic order – both organically enabled by the Internet of Things, as well as a reaction to its impacts and side effects.  Collaborative Commons (CC) is characterised by open source information, technology and energy; the blurring of consumer vs. producers into prosumers; access to products becoming the norm over product ownership; and rise of the gig economy over traditional employment.  Basically, it’s a society where citizens and organizations openly collaborate to both create common wealth and draw from it.

While ad-hoc CC instances in some sectors are already generating benefits for its constituents, there are still many unanswered questions and challenges going forward.  What are the trade-offs between different CC models and what model(s) work best?  How can trust, which is critical to collaboration, be engendered and supported among participants? What might be some negative side-effects of CC?  How does CC interplay with traditional market economies, what sectors are best suited for CC, and what are the transition timeframes and trade-offs? What regulatory supports are needed to enable, ease transition, and protect against undesired aspects of the CC?  A heavy dose of Social Innovation is needed now to address the unknowns so that civil society can come out whole on the other side of the transition into Collaborative Commons.

This and related topics are skillfully covered by economist Jeremy Rifkin in The Zero Marginal Cost Society, and related works such as The Sharing Economy by Arun Sundararajan, and Makers and Takers by Rana Foroohar.

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Fab Labs Nation

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/11/2016 1468243720
Le français suit. The “Fab Labs Nation” project proposes a concerted strategy to equip Canada with a digital manufacturing interstructur .... Read more

Le français suit.

The “Fab Labs Nation” project proposes a concerted strategy to equip Canada with a digital manufacturing interstructure that makes it possible to promote, entrepreneurship and the creation of jobs of the future as well as innovation in communities and businesses.

A Fab Lab is a collaborative innovation laboratory equipped with digital production machine tools (3D printers, laser cutters, digital milling machines, etc.) and an innovation accelerator where students, engineers, inventors, creators and all those who have a project gather to go from the idea to the object. The Fab Lab offers its users the means necessary for professional digital design to conduct collaborative innovation projects, access to quick prototyping.

A true international community gravitates around the Fab Labs, by implementing laboratories in hundreds of cities and villages. The potential which emanates from them for economic and social development steadily increases and is explored in numerous sectors: health, creativity, education, entrepreneurship, etc. The Fab Labs are part of an open innovation movement and are the tangible tools of a Smart City.

 

L'initiative « Fab Labs Nation » propose une stratégie concertée pour doter le Canada d’une interstructure de fabrication numérique permettant de favoriser l'entrepreneuriat et la création d'emplois d'avenir, l'innovation dans les communautés et les entreprises.

Un Fab Lab est un laboratoire d’innovation collaborative équipé de machines-outils de fabrication numérique (imprimante 3D, découpe laser, fraiseuse numérique, etc.) et un accélérateur d'innovation où les étudiants, les ingénieurs, les inventeurs, les créateurs et tous ceux qui ont un projet entrepreneurial se réunissent pour passer de l’idée à l’objet. Le Fab Lab offre à ses usagers les moyens de conception numérique professionnel nécessaires pour mener des projets d’innovation collaboratifs, l'accès au prototypage rapide.

Une véritable communauté internationale gravite autour des Fab Labs, par l'implantation de laboratoires dans des centaines de villes et villages. Le potentiel qui en découle pour le développement économique et social croit sans cesse et est exploré dans de multiples secteurs : santé, créativité, éducation, entrepreneurship, etc.. Les Fab Labs font partie du mouvement d'innovation ouverte (open innovation) et sont les outils concrets d'une Ville intelligente (Smart City).

 Source : http://www.communautique.quebec/portfolio-items/fablabs-nation/?portfolioID=33

 

 

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Innovation vs. Entrepreneurship

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/12/2016 1468327284
If we want to be a nation of Innovators then I think we need to also talk about the connection and differences between entrepreneurs and innovators.  .... Read more

If we want to be a nation of Innovators then I think we need to also talk about the connection and differences between entrepreneurs and innovators. 

I run a summer intensive entrepreneurship program for youth at Algonquin College called SUMMIT. As I've shared with them, all entrepreneurs are innovators but not all innovators are entrepreneurs. I describe entrepreneurship as a riding a roller coaster wrapped in chaos. You have to be the right kind of person to jump aboard that ride. But not everyone needs to jump on board. The entrepreneurs that start the businesses and are interested in that ride need a talent pool of innovators to hire and inspire them. Although, we need to support entrepreneurs we also need to breed innovators. 

The Conference Board of Canada has outlined a set of Innovation Skills that includes: creativity & problem solving, communication & collaboration, risk assessment and risk taking, and implementation skills. I think these are the skills that need to be infused in our education system and organizations at all levels.

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National Innovation Voucher Program - Students Gain Experience in Startups

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/20/2016 1469030961
Take great provincial examples like BCIC Innovator Skills Initiative and the Nova Scotia Productivity and Innovation Voucher Program and create a nati .... Read more

Take great provincial examples like BCIC Innovator Skills Initiative and the Nova Scotia Productivity and Innovation Voucher Program and create a national effort to supply students with applied knowledge and skills through working directly in startups/SMB environment. At the same time ,you will be building stronger linkages with businesses, universities, colleges and research organizations and exposure to entrepreneurship career stream.

Provinces that already have programs in place will maintain their inter-province competitive advantage and either expand scope and eligibility of students and firms. They could also have the option of providing voucher for ICT skills development of existing employees like the B.C Micro Business Training (MBT) Program.

Federal government can have the oversight to ensure all provinces all equipped at a high standard and the provinces can choose to expand scope of program or eligibility to differentiate themselves in the clusters they have deemed a priority.

Links to examples below:

http://bcic.ca/programs_initiatives/current/bcic-innovator-skills-initiative/

https://innovacorp.ca/acceleration-initiatives/productivity-and-innovation-voucher-program

https://www.linkedin.com/company/micro-business-training-pilot-program

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National Youth Science and Innovation Network

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 07/27/2016 1469642783
Stimulating interest in and supporting a national network for youth to explore hands-on, project-based science. Canada's response to the technologica .... Read more

Stimulating interest in and supporting a national network for youth to explore hands-on, project-based science.

Canada's response to the technological and space race in the 1960s was the development of local, regional and national opportunities to foster and showcase the innovativeness of youth in science - science fairs. Over five decades, this network - primarily driven by volunteers and teachers - has helped develop some of Canada's (and the world's) leaders in business, research, science and social impact. From Roberta Bondar to Michael Serbinis to Marc Kielburger to Raymond Wang, science fairs have helped shape the impact Canada has on the world.

Investing in a proven program that encourages youth from curiosity through to discovery will ensure Canada's success in innovation, skills development and will creates the nation's future economic leaders.

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Tailored Service

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 08/08/2016 1470686588
What would make Canada more innovative and entrepreneurial would be to have more access to assistance tailored on individual needs.

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Make work-integrated learning opportunities the cornerstone of the Innovation Agenda

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/09/2016 1470776531
People innovate. Whether it takes the form of a new product, new process, or new markets, the introduction of innovation is done by visionary individu .... Read more

People innovate. Whether it takes the form of a new product, new process, or new markets, the introduction of innovation is done by visionary individuals who see how to do things differently. A successful innovation strategy must therefore start by fostering the talent, skills and opportunities required for potential innovators to thrive.

The need for innovators intensifies as the economy continues to move towards an innovation-focused, high-value service base. Already, Canada’s service economy employs about three quarters of Canadians and accounts for 70.8% of GDP — a 5% increase since 2000. Financial services, environmental services, water-management services, and IT services are all areas where Canada is a world-leader, thanks in part to the innovators who have built world-class firms in these growing sectors.

The trend towards an economy built on innovative services is intensifying as the knowledge economy evolves. We are entering what has been called the “Fourth Industrial Revolution,” where disruptive technology such as artificial intelligence, robotics and nanotechnology are quickly transforming the ways we live and work. As a result, the skills Canadians need for career success are also changing, and employers increasingly demand workers with a wide range of skills and functional knowledge.

An effective innovation strategy will respond to these trends by supporting the effective education and training of future innovators. To do so, Canada needs to increase the number of work-integrated learning opportunities for students in order to grow talent and skills, and to prepare the next generation for a rapidly changing economy. In order to “futureproof” a workforce, the World Economic Forum reports that “government and businesses will need to profoundly change their approach to education, skills and employment,” and they recommend enhanced collaboration between businesses, governments and education providers in developing 21st century curriculums.

There are some caveats: students should be paid; the learning opportunities should be relevant; and the experiences should be meaningful. The idea is that the opportunities are collaborative, and mutually beneficial. By connecting young minds with dynamic Canadian businesses, we can grow Canadian talent for innovation, strengthen the employability of post-secondary graduates, and provide businesses with the specialized knowledge, skilled talent and fresh perspectives they will need to adapt and innovate.

If Canada is serious about becoming an innovation leader, we need to make work-integrated learning opportunities the cornerstone of the Innovation Agenda.

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Chercher les jeunes talents

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 08/11/2016 1470924571
Pour faire du Canada un pays plus novateur et axé sur l'entrepreneurait il faut rejoindre les jeunes talents et prendre avantage de leur côté créa .... Read more

Pour faire du Canada un pays plus novateur et axé sur l'entrepreneurait il faut rejoindre les jeunes talents et prendre avantage de leur côté créatifs, de faire des appels d'offre pour pouvoir voir leurs projets et être à l'affut de leurs besoins actuels. Ces jeunes qui n'ont pas été moulés par la société ont plus de chance d'avoir des projets novateurs et « out of the box » qui pourrait faire avancer le Canada comme chef de file de l'entrepreneuriat.

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Four Ideas to Grow Innovative Talent

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/12/2016 1471029760
Canada needs a talent strategy for growth. Within our publicly-funded post-secondary institutions, we need to focus federal supports to produce &ldquo .... Read more

Canada needs a talent strategy for growth. Within our publicly-funded post-secondary institutions, we need to focus federal supports to produce “made-in-Canada” talent: the highly qualified and skilled workers that Canadian businesses and organizations seek.  Without better labour market forecasting, Canada cannot build an inclusive talent pool for the 21st century workplace.  We present four ideas below:

  1. Direct Statistics Canada to create, deliver and disseminate high-quality, current, relevant and comparable labour market information.

This information will benefit learners and employers and encourage informed choices about careers and jobs by providing data on skills-in-demand, employment outcomes by education type, demand for work-integrated learning, apprenticeship completion rates

2. Create a Youth Entrepreneur Seed Fund to support students enrolled in post-secondary institutions to acquire vital entrepreneurial skills.

Polytechnics and colleges offer many services, courses and centres to help young entrepreneurs. Current federal support for young entrepreneurs exists as repayable loans only; we propose a grant program for students working under the guidance of an instructor or mentor.

3. Create an innovation-focused internship program connecting polytechnic and college undergraduate students with firms and non-profit organizations.

This work-integrated learning initiative will build applied research and innovation skills, as well as enhance graduate employment outcomes, while also addressing employer need for workers with innovation skills.

4. Expand existing research talent programs at the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) to increase participation by polytechnic and college students.

Evidence shows that real-world research is conducted by collaborative teams, across the credential spectrum. Yet, programs designed to mentor the next generation of researchers are primarily open to graduate and post-doctoral researchers because of a narrow interpretation of terms and conditions. These programs should include the talent produced by polytechnics and colleges.

A polytechnic education builds resilient and resourceful workers for the 21st century economy.  These talented learners should be included in any government action for equipping youth with entrepreneurial and creative skills.

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Inform Canadians on the culture and attitudes required to be a successful entrepreneur.

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/16/2016 1471377720
Tags: entrepreneurs 
“Why is Canada, and therefore, Ontario lagging when it comes to entrepreneurship and innovation? There is a burning desire inside Canadian entre .... Read more

“Why is Canada, and therefore, Ontario lagging when it comes to entrepreneurship and innovation? There is a burning desire inside Canadian entrepreneurs to create businesses, and yet, we are not seeing the results we might expect. So let's look at why there's a disconnect between desire and performance. The answer is that we are still new to the innovation game. Many Canadians don't understand the culture and attitudes required to be a successful entrepreneur. And that is an eminently fixable problem.”

Karen Sievewright, co-owner of HJC Consultants (hjc.com), has a PhD in engineering, and a masters of business administration, How Canada can build a champion entrepreneurial culture, Globe and Mail, July 19 2016

 

Credit: Karen Sievewright, co-owner of HJC Consultants (hjc.com)

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Appui au mémoire du Chantier de l'économie sociale : de l'innovation à l'innovation sociale

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 08/17/2016 1471462104
Tags: entrepreneurs 
Le Pôle des entreprises d'économie sociale de la Capitale-Nationale est une communauté d'affaires qui regroupe et représente les entreprises d'éc .... Read more

Le Pôle des entreprises d'économie sociale de la Capitale-Nationale est une communauté d'affaires qui regroupe et représente les entreprises d'économie sociale de Portneuf à Charlevoix, en passant par la Ville de Québec. La région de la Capitale-Nationale regroupe plus de 800 entreprises pour qui la croissance se fait dans un esprit de développement durable.

Nous appuyons le mémoire déposé par le Chantier de l'économie sociale en pièce jointe de ce message. En particulier, nous souhaitons saisir cette occasion pour insister sur l'importance de stimuler l'activité sociale et économique des entreprises collectives, en tenant compte de leur spécificité et de leur rôle dans l’amélioration de la qualité de vie des Canadiens.

Credit: Chantier de l'économie sociale

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Innovation with Robotics

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/17/2016 1471465700
FIRST Robotics Canada (a non-profit organization) is also currently working diligently and tirelessly to support and prepare the next generation to be .... Read more

FIRST Robotics Canada (a non-profit organization) is also currently working diligently and tirelessly to support and prepare the next generation to be innovators and thought-leaders of the future. Through FIRST programs and initiatives, students are becoming more skilled and prepared to face the challenges of the future. With a stronger connection and increased support, FIRST could play an even greater role in preparing the next generation to make Canada great.

“Canada needs a bold, coordinated strategy on innovation that delivers results for all Canadians. We need to move forward with fresh ideas and a joint action plan that will make innovation a national priority and put Canada on a firm path to long-term economic growth.” –The Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development

We at FIRST whole-heartedly agree with Minister Bains approach to innovation. We currently see a talent pool of kids and students who, if given the opportunity and know-how, will inherently approach problem solving with an innovative approach. Currently, youth are not widely given that opportunity which results in a lack of a prepared and innovative leaders and workforce.

This is where FIRST Robotics Canada programs make a difference. FIRST programs teach kids and youth the necessary skills and strategy that inspire fresh ideas, innovation, and creative problem solving. If more students are exposed to, and participate in, FIRST programs, they will cultivate the skills and habits for the future that lead to unlimited potential and opportunities. These are the leaders who will help put Canada on the firm path to economic growth and sustainability.

With increased support for FIRST programs, the benefits include:

  • More student participation in FIRST programs, resulting in more students prepared for a future where creative problem solving is critical
  • Cultivating a future workforce of leaders who believe in teamwork, encourage diversity, and inspire creativity 
  • Developing and teaching students the skills and know-how to embrace challenges with an innovative mindset
  • Showcasing and proving that we’re surrounded by talent who will have the competencies to compete in a digital world, lead global partnerships and change, encourage entrepreneurship, and accelerate growth in Canadian business
  • Increased collaboration between organizations and corporations involved in FIRST and kids and youth across Canada

This kind of program truly makes a difference in cultivating the leaders and innovators of the future.

Credit: FIRST Robotics Canada

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Créer une plateforme numérique de formation et d'échange d'expertises entre jeunes entrepreneurs

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/19/2016 1471580239
Tags: entrepreneurs 
Le projet Solidarineurs se veut une plateforme d'échanges d'expertises entre entrepreneurs de toute horizon pour propulser des entreprises à succès .... Read more

Le projet Solidarineurs se veut une plateforme d'échanges d'expertises entre entrepreneurs de toute horizon pour propulser des entreprises à succès. Il est maintenant temps de conjuguer Solidarité et Entrepreneuriat.

La grande majorité des entrepreneurs privés comme sociaux ne vont pas au bout de leur rêve parce qu'ils ne disposent pas des moyens financiers pour couvrir les frais de démarrage (étude de marché, plan d'affaires, frais juridiques, frais de promotionnels et divers besoins d'expertises).

D'énormes quantités de connaissances, de ressources et d'expertises s'accumulent au fil du temps et de génération d'entrepreneurs mais ne circulent pas ou très peu.

Par ailleurs, chaque entrepreneur a une force, une expertise pointue qu'il pourrait échanger avec l'expertise pointue d'un autre pour répondre au besoin de son entreprise.

 La plateforme se déploiera par réseaux d’entrepreneurs par municipalité ou régions à travers le Canada. Elle sera basée sur un échange d’expertises non monétaires entre entrepreneurs et fonctionnera sous le modèle des banques de temps.

ENTREPREINTRANEURSHIP DOESN'T HAVE TO BE DIFFICULT

SOLIDARINEURS makes it easier for people that WANT to be in business for themselves to FIND those that offer the services and opportunities (EXPERTISES) they NEED to accomplish this goal.

STARTING A BUSINESS HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER!

Aspiring Entrepreneurs are finding the resources they need to start and grow their own businesses. SOLIDARINEURS can help you access the funds you need if you’re having difficulty with lenders and investors. A FREE trial account is available.

HOUSANDS OF ENTREPREINTRANEURS LIKE YOU ARE WAITING TO SHARING THEIR EXPERTISES !

You can now find the ideal target market for your business opportunity and/or service quickly and effectively. SOLIDARINEURS is an online network designed to help connect aspiring Entrepreneurs who want to share their expertises with others.

Credit: Mobilisons Montréal (OSBL)

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Nurturing and entrepreneurial mindset with peer to peer learning

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 08/31/2016 1472657406
One way to nurture and entrepreneurial and innovative skillset and mindset in today’s youth is to provide students at all levels with the opport .... Read more

One way to nurture and entrepreneurial and innovative skillset and mindset in today’s youth is to provide students at all levels with the opportunity to collaborate on interdisciplinary teams on entrepreneurial endeavors. At George Brown College we facilitate with through Peer to Peer (P2P) learning.

startGBC, your gateway to entrepreneurship at George Brown College is a virtual hub, connecting entrepreneurial students, alumni and faculty to the resources they need.  We have matched startGBC student entrepreneurs with business, design and engineering students who act as consultants on matters such as positioning, product design and prototyping, market research, customer validation, pricing, etc.  Both sides of the transaction benefit as the student entrepreneurs gain valuable insights and recommendations from their peers and the consulting students experience working with real-life customers, products and solutions rather than generic case studies.  They are also able to add this background to their resumes and to speak knowledgably about their consulting experience during interviews with prospective employers.

At George Brown, we have received excellent feedback from both faculty and students, and we plan to expand the P2P model, with the addition of student “subject matter experts”, from areas like culinary management and health sciences.

Credit: George Brown College Research & Innovation

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Support university design teams to create skilled, ambitious STEM professionals

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 09/02/2016 1472820482
Background: Design teams are university clubs that develop technical solutions often to compete at some local or international event. They offer an un .... Read more

Background: Design teams are university clubs that develop technical solutions often to compete at some local or international event. They offer an unprecedented learn-and-create opportunity for university students across many STEM fields, including engineering, life sciences, computer science, mathematics, and physics. This experience in teamwork and problem-solving is what we need in the real world. Design teams build mindsets of innovation that shape culture, and create highly competent, hardworking individuals that go on to create change whether in Canada in abroad.

Recommendation: The federal government should...

  • Create more funding support for university design teams
  • Create awards to recognize design team excellence
  • Work with design teams to develop collaborative programs whereby design teams/university clubs can partner with the government or private companies to advance their programs (e.g. access to NRC Wind Tunnels, using racetracks owned by private auto companies)

Experiential evidence:

As the President of the University of Toronto Aerospace Team (UTAT), Canada's largest aerospace engineering design team, I can attest to the following having been on the team for more than three years...

  • Employers value relevant professional experience more than high grades, and design teams are counted as professional experience
  • We publish research and design papers annually at internationally renowned conference and journal papers
  • The majority of our design team members feel like they learn more through design teams than through their university classes
  • The most ambitious design teams cement the theory taught in classes by applying them to practical problems where the metric of success is the performance of a real technology, not a grade on a test
  • Design teams cultivate entrepreneurial drive, and a significant number of UTAT alumni have founded successful Canadian start-ups, both within and outside the context of aerospace
  • The skills developed within UTAT are seen as internationally competitive, evidenced by organizations such as SpaceX and the German Aerospace Center coming directly to us for recruitment
  • The list goes on...

This story is not unique to UTAT, or to U of T. Look at the UMSATS at the University of Manitoba, or Space Concordia at Concordia University. As an aerospace engineer-to-be I draw on examples in aerospace but this story happen in many different locations with many different focuses and many different levels of support, but to the same end.

Final comments:

Design teams create real skills and ambition for creating a globally competitive workforce, right here in Canada. And if students find something they love, know that they're competent at it, and were able to develop themselves and their design team projects within Canada, that results in a culture of innovation. Throw in the ability to form an attractive vision for staying in Canada (which depends on other factors), and now those skills and attitudes remain part of our great country.

Credit: Jeremy Wang, UAS Engineering Lead @ The Sky Guys

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Government Procurement Preference for Social Enterprises

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 09/07/2016 1473283700
Canada can and should be leading the world in social entrepreneurship; by diverting efforts and funding out of resource extraction and into entreprene .... Read more

Canada can and should be leading the world in social entrepreneurship; by diverting efforts and funding out of resource extraction and into entrepreneurship training programs, Canada could, at a national level, turn Canadian’s attentions away from the old economy and towards the values-based economy. The values-based economy is the ultimate vision for organizations like Certified B Corps. In this vision, businesses start to compete not only for market share, but for recognition as top “impactors.” As B Labs puts it, it is the drive to “be not only the best in the world, but the best for the world. A values-based economy is one in which the average consumer considers the values, philosophy and business practices of the organizations they choose to purchase from, before they make their purchase decisions. The Canadian Government can also provide incentives to business faculties at higher-learning facilities to change-over to values-based business teaching.

In order to lead social entrepreneurship, Canadian society needs to value green business certifications (example: LEED Certifications), social enterprise certifications (example: B Corp status) and social responsibility certifications (example: Fair Trade certification).

The Canadian Government can support this culture shift towards a values-driven economy by pledging to seek tenders from these types of certified, socially-focused organizations. Government contracts are extremely influential in the Canadian marketplace and it really matters who the Federal Government chooses to do business with. The Government can look at commitments like that of the City of Toronto (http://on.thestar.com/2cbohRw), which has committed to purchasing from more diverse organizations as a guide.

If Canadian entrepreneurs truly believe that their businesses are more likely to be successful as social enterprises rather than as traditional profit maximizers, they will structure their businesses as social enterprises. By providing opportunities to learn about triple-bottom lines, CSR reporting and social innovation, the Canadian Government can encourage social entrepreneurship.

Credit: Animikii Inc., B Corp Canada

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National Entrepreneur Day

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/17/2016 1474133348
"In order to progress, modern society should be treating ruined entrepreneurs in the same way we honor dead soldiers, perhaps not with as much honor, .... Read more

"In order to progress, modern society should be treating ruined entrepreneurs in the same way we honor dead soldiers, perhaps not with as much honor, but using exactly the same logic (the entrepreneur is still alive, though perhaps morally broken and socially stigmatized. For there is no such thing as a failed soldier, dead or alive —likewise, there is no such thing as a failed entrepreneur or failed scientific researcher"

National Entrepreneur Day, with the following message:

Most of you will fail, disrespected, impoverished, but we aregrateful for the risks you are taking and the sacrifices you are making for the sake of the economic growth of the planet and pulling others out of poverty. You are at the source of our antifragility. Our nation thanks you."

Credit: Nassim Taleb

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Collaborations, partnerships and innovation for impact

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 09/19/2016 1474313214
Canada is not currently a leader in the social entrepreneurship space. As with all types of entrepreneurship, Canadian policies and programs must exis .... Read more

Canada is not currently a leader in the social entrepreneurship space. As with all types of entrepreneurship, Canadian policies and programs must exist to incent investment in entrepreneurial projects, including those that address issues of social importance. Organizations that are applying or contributing their resources to help make a positive social impact and those that contribute to building innovative solutions should be incented and rewarded for doing so.

 

While the video game industry exists primarily to create entertainment products, a number of the innovations developed in the sector can, and have, been utilized to advance research and innovation in other sectors, including health, which have a profound social impact. In essence, the tools developed for entertainment now have serious applications in robotics, sports, physical and mental health treatments (to manage anxiety disorders, depression, grief and PTSD with war veterans).

 

A recent example is the collaborations between Ubisoft Montreal, McGill University, and Amblyotech to tackle the problem of amblyopia, or more commonly known as “lazy-eye.” The condition affects three per cent of children internationally and occurs when the brain favours one eye over the other. The inspired video game Dig Rush, played on a tablet with 3D glasses encourages active focusing and is thought to be five times more effective than the current treatment option of eye-patching.

 

As a driver of social innovation, games have served as invaluable tools in education, helping kids and adults learn the skills needed to participate in the innovation economy. Today, Canada can also boast an active group of academics playing a role in pushing the boundaries of games to new areas. The University of Waterloo’s Games Institute is using games research and technology and applying them to non-game situations, a practice commonly known as gamification.

 

The Games Institute is working with partners such as FlourishiQ to research games and gamification techniques to engage the users of the company’s wearable device in establishing daily insights on wellness data, sleep and other physiological data that can be monitored to improve quality of life. Gamification techniques are being used in games to help users find safe spaces in urban environments while another game, Spirit 50, incentivizes exercise for older adults as they engage with technology. The UpSWinG project in development with collaborators at McGill University use game techniques to engage policy stakeholders in solutions for improving sustainable water governance.

 

If Canada is to remain a leader in innovation, more must be done to focus our efforts on building up the resource that is primarily responsible for innovation — talent/labour. There already exists a global race to drive innovation forward by obtaining the best and brightest talent. to drive innovation forward and create the products and services that change the way we live, work and play. We need to ensure that our industries and University have the policy tools needed to compete on this truly global battleground. The ability to lay claim to those innovators is the only way to compete with other innovation nations around the world. Canada must develop an immigration framework that allows the seamless and efficient movement of highly skilled workers in the technology fields.

 

But targeted immigration isn’t enough. A domestic digital skills training strategy is also key to our continued success. How countries arm their future workers with the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) skills to compete in a global and innovation driven economy will mark the difference between a country that falls behind and a country that prospers and thrives.

 

Other jurisdictions, like the United Kingdom, France and the US already have substantial infrastructure and frameworks to support social entrepreneurship and innovation including policies, legislation, funding and programming, which is available to all sizes of companies and individuals at various stages in their careers that engage in social entrepreneurship, whether directly or indirectly.

 

We encourage the Government to review global solutions in place at present, and consider ways to learn from the strengths of these programs to create and implement a diverse set of programs, incentives and opportunities for Canadians and companies in Canada to innovate and contribute to advancing socially impactful innovations across all sectors and communities.

Credit: Entertainment Software Association of Canada

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Whole Girl, Whole World through Digital Filmmaking

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/23/2016 1474645330
Digital filmmaking has become more pervasive than ever in all areas of life. The influential broadcasting quality of the film medium is apparent on vi .... Read more

Digital filmmaking has become more pervasive than ever in all areas of life. The influential broadcasting quality of the film medium is apparent on virtual platforms like YouTube, where millions of young people view independent films every day. With this distribution power, young women’s perspectives can impact their families, peers, communities, and the world.

Credit: Chantal Drolet

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Create an inclusive economy, including innovation support systems for Canadians in rural, remote, and Aboriginal communities.

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 09/28/2016 1475078639
It is growing increasingly clear that an economy in which only certain segments of the population participate in the economy and are afforded innovati .... Read more

It is growing increasingly clear that an economy in which only certain segments of the population participate in the economy and are afforded innovation support will underperform. As the Federal Government strives to make its Innovation Agenda as inclusive as possible it will be important to ensure that supports for innovation are not merely concentrated in the largest, most affluent cities, but also are developed to allow Canadians living in rural, remote, and Aboriginal communities—communities often facing the most difficult economic challenges in the country, not to mention being the site of the natural resources that continue to drive the national economy—to avail, including the supports offered by universities, ranging from academic programs, pure and applied collaborative research opportunities, and entrepreneurship training and support (i.e. incubation and acceleration).

Ensure that any new Federal innovation policies or funding programs, including those for incubators and accelerators, are developed to allow Canadians living in rural, remote, and Aboriginal communities to avail of the benefits of working with university, and other players in the innovation ecosystem.

Credit: Memorial University of Newfoundland

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What does it take for Canada to be known globally as the best country in attracting and developing diverse, high-end talent?

Question:How can Canada become the best country in attracting and developing talent?
on 09/29/2016 1475179612
Numerous studies have shown the positive relationship between immigration and innovation. Immigrants bring with them specialized skills and experience .... Read more

Numerous studies have shown the positive relationship between immigration and innovation. Immigrants bring with them specialized skills and experience, diverse perspectives, international relationships and networks, and an entrepreneurial spirit. With an aging population and low birth rates, Canada will increasingly rely on immigration to ensure our labour market needs are met in the future. CPA Canada’s own internal occupational demand analysis shows this to be true for our profession.

 

We face competition for the best and the brightest. If we are to be competitive as a destination of choice, we must do a better job of attracting talent, smoothing the integration of newcomers into the workforce and providing them with the best opportunity to succeed. We must also do a better job of processing applications with speed and certainty.

 

CPA Canada has provided more specific input to this matter in our submission to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada’s recent online consultation, a National Conversation on Immigration.[1] Several key points are worth expanding upon in the context of Canada’s innovation agenda.

 

The Express Entry system of managing the economic class immigration streams would benefit from further refinement. Three reforms in particular are worth consideration: a re-examination of the emphasis on youth; replacing Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIAs); and supporting the role of international students in meeting labour market needs.

 

Age is one of the criteria for awarding points in the comprehensive ranking system for Express Entry applications. Generally, it makes sense to award a greater number of points for youth – as the point structure does – because younger immigrants have more years to contribute to Canada’s labour market. However, some highly specialized skills or executive-level experience can only be acquired through experience over time. The point system as currently structured unintentionally penalizes senior business executives and specialists for their wealth of experience. It also penalizes Canadian employers who need to fill particular niche roles for which suitable candidates are scarce.

 

This is particularly important when it comes to one of Canada’s biggest innovation challenges: our struggles to grow firms to a larger scale. A 2016 study by the Lazaridis Institute examined the barriers faced by high-growth Canadian technology firms and concluded that the biggest challenge was a lack of experienced management and executive talent. In particular, respondents indicated a shortfall of executives with first-hand experience scaling up technology firms.[2] Canadian firms need access to a deeper talent pool than the country’s labour supply is able to provide. Age should not preclude skilled managerial talent from consideration.

 

 

A central purpose behind Express Entry was to make Canada’s economic class immigration streams more responsive to labour market needs by enabling employer demand to directly impact the selection of immigrants. As such, the offer of employment from a Canadian employer is a significant component of the Express Entry point structure. But as a report by the Canadian Chamber of Commerce illustrated, by making that offer of employment contingent on a positive LMIA, the demand-driven thrust of Express Entry has been negated by what is essentially a protectionist labour market test.[3]

 

The Chamber makes a well-reasoned argument to replace the LMIA, to which we will just add that the LMIA requirement adds further time, administrative compliance and uncertainty to the Express Entry application process. The resulting delays and uncertainty are felt by both Canadian employers and prospective immigrants. The most sought-after international talent has options, and delays and uncertainty in the application process make Canada less competitive.

 

International students enrich the learning environment in Canada’s education institutions and make a substantial contribution to our economy in the process. There are sound economic reasons why Canada should position itself as the destination of choice for international students. Similarly, there are good reasons why we should look to these international students as potential future Canadians. No immigrants are better poised for success in Canada’s labour market than those who already possess a Canadian education, a comfort with Canadian society, and perhaps Canadian work experience.

 

But once again, Express Entry has minimized the opportunities for this talent pool, or at least created more uncertainty than before the system was introduced. The Canadian Experience Class (CEC) had been a convenient and successful pathway for international students to pursue immigration to Canada. In fact, in recent years, the Canadian government had set ambitious targets for CEC in order to maximize the number of international students who chose to stay. Since CEC is one of the economic class immigration programs subject to Express Entry, international students must now be ranked based on the Express Entry point system and compete with other potential immigrants. Their Canadian education and experience does not necessarily have any additional value under the point system.

 

Express Entry’s impact on CEC may make Canada a less desirable destination for international students in the first place. There should not be any guarantees of permanent residency offered to international students who come to Canada. However, at the same time, students should be able to realistically assess their chances of staying should they want to do so. Express Entry’s point system presents a rather cloudy view, and if other international students are less successful in pursuing immigration (as early Express Entry results suggest), then Canada may appear a less attractive choice for their studies. Once again, it is a matter of competition. The best and brightest international students will choose to go to the countries that offer the best educational opportunities along with the best long-term career prospects.

 

 

Recommendations:

 

  • Re-evaluate the points awarded for age under Express Entry to ensure that Canadian employers are not denied access to international talent with highly valued skills and experience.
  • Consider replacing the Labour Market Impact Assessment under Express Entry. If it is necessary to have a labour market test or validation of a legitimate job offer, ensure that the process is fast, efficient and clear.
  • If the Canadian Experience Class must be subject to the Express Entry points system, ensure that a Canadian education and experience is valued as it is in the Canadian marketplace.

 

How do we work together to better equip our young people with the right skill sets for the economy of the future?     

 

Much emphasis is placed on the need for Canada to graduate more students from the so-called STEM fields of study – science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Certainly these fields are critical for an innovation-driven economy. But just as important is the need for business graduates that have a sophisticated understanding of how to grow businesses through each stage of development, how to pursue opportunities in Canada and abroad, and how to anticipate and adapt to change.

 

An expert panel struck by the Council of Canadian Academies noted that STEM skills are not sufficient on their own to ensure improvements in innovation, productivity or growth. “Other skills such as leadership, creativity, adaptability, and entrepreneurial ability may be required to maximize the impact of STEM skills,” their report stated.[4]

 

The Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity measured the specific shortfall in business skills finding that, when compared to the United States, Canada has a significant gap in the number of business degree holders. “More alarming is the lower educational attainment of those in management occupations, irrespective of field of study. Just over a third of our managers have a university degree, compared to half in the United States,” the institute warned.[5]

 

The OECD has also noted that Canada lags its peers in the development of business and entrepreneurial skills. In addition, it identified another reason to emphasize the importance of management talent – Canadians’ perceived aversion to risk and the contribution that makes to the country’s commercialization gap. It suggests that more management training and higher education in general would help to address that problem:

The best way to stimulate willingness to take risk may be to boost competitive pressures and openness … and to complement this by enhanced attention to management training and diversity at all educational levels. More tertiary education in general is also needed … Canada still lags in attainment of university degrees, whereas highly educated persons are much more likely to be owners of high-growth innovative firms.[6]

 

In addition to developing managerial talent, we need to do a better job of instilling basic business skills in graduates of all fields. The STEM graduates who may create the products, processes and services of the future, would benefit greatly from a fundamental understanding of how to commercialize their ideas and take them successfully to market. Yet interdisciplinary studies are often discouraged or even prevented. In some cases, spaces in business classes are reserved for students in business programs, making them unavailable to students in science faculties. On the other hand, students in STEM fields may believe that focusing their studies as narrowly as possible gives them greater expertise and enhances their employability.

 

The OECD recommends that post-secondary education institutions include training in entrepreneurship and business skills in their science-based programs, a recommendation we endorse. Greater awareness also needs to be generated regarding the business training resources that exist beyond post-secondary institutions, such as those provided by the Forum for International Trade Training (FITT).

 

Business-oriented financial literacy programs can also improve basic awareness of business skills. In fact, CPA Canada and thousands of CPA volunteers deliver a range of financial literacy programs to Canadians each year. Some of those programs are targeted to entrepreneurs or operators of SMEs to provide some of the essential knowledge and skills for operating a business.

 

By promoting a general understanding of business and removing barriers to interdisciplinary studies, we would develop a more entrepreneurial, adaptable and innovative workforce. The possession of specialized knowledge or skills along with an understanding of how to apply them in a business environment is a combination that should be encouraged.

 

Recommendations:

  • Ensure that Canada’s business schools are producing the sophisticated business managers needed to start, lead and grow firms into successful global players.
  • Encourage more interdisciplinary study in post-secondary education to enable innovators and inventors to also have a fundamental understanding of business, finance and entrepreneurialism.

 

[1] To be available on CPA Canada’s website at cpacanada.ca.

[2] Lazaridis Institute, Scaling Success: Tackling the Management Gap in Canada’s Technology Sector, Wilfred Laurier University, March 2016.

[3] Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Immigration for a Competitive Canada: Why Highly Skilled International Talent is at Risk, January 2016.

[4] Council of Canadian Academies, 2015, Some Assembly Required: STEM Skills and Canada’s Economic Productivity, Ottawa: The Expert Panel on STEM Skills for the Future, Council of Canadian Academies.

[5] Institute for Competitiveness & Prosperity, Canada’s Innovation Imperative: Report on Canada 2011.

[6] Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (2012), OECD Economic Surveys: Canada 2012, OECD Publishing.

Credit: Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada

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Online Education - Innovative, affordable, lifelong learning; for everyone, anywhere, anytime.

Question:What more can be done to cement Canada's place as a leader in social entrepreneurship?
on 10/04/2016 1475582470
AukSun Consultants Ltd. is incorporated in Canada and UK, and registered in Pakistan. AukSun has grouped together multilingual promoters and developed .... Read more

AukSun Consultants Ltd. is incorporated in Canada and UK, and registered in Pakistan. AukSun has grouped together multilingual promoters and developed an online e-schooling systemAukSunLMS ( http://www.auksun.com/eSchool/summary.html ). We are seeking funds from funding institutions to operate AukSunLMS and build capacity to go global.We provide innovative affordable lifelong learning for everyone anywhere anytime. A working model is ready; comprising; clients, courses, learners, website, iOS App, advertising and CRM-templates. In our collaborative learning system, clients are; institutions, corporates and teachers who use dedicated web pages to teach their pupils in a customised and managed way. We facilitate and train our clients; and market and advertise their courses. We provide relevant ready-made courses to help our clients to jump start or upgrade.

We earn through subscribing students and this income is shared with respective institutes and teachers. We also earn from corporations according to the pricing plan they select. Corporations save significantly in their training budgets by adopting our methods.Subscribers learn at their own pace, from home/office on laptops/smartphones. Considering our volume-based business; prices are significantly lower than traditional schooling/tutoring.Collaborated business model is an innovative way to reduce entry barriers and enrol large groups of end users. Instead of competing traditional institutions, we facilitate them to provide better services to their learners. A win-win-win for AukSunLMS-institution-learner.

Benefits of eLearning are unmatched to traditional teaching methods. Learners benefit from AukSunLMS as a supplement (or replacement) to  traditional learning; saves time, cost and effort. Courses are available 24/7/365. Course quality is enhanced using better material, technology and methods. Learning is managed, upgraded, based on learning behavior. AukSunLMS imparts education through voiceover  presentations, videos and tests online. It manages progress, connects learners to educators, employers, funders and other sources. Seamless integration across all user-devises is provided to learners. A Certificate of completion is auto-emailed to the recipients.Major Expenses Our one-time cost and lower recurring cost makes it an ideal investment with significant ROI from Yr-2. AukSunLMS requires  $110,500 to operate. Funds are required to develop and expand globally through interactive website, learning management system, email  campaigns, courses and personnel. We will develop/buy quality educational courses as one-time purchase or percentage revenue sharing basis from prominent developers and teachers around the world. As cost is recovered, further distribution of courses will bear less cost. Hence we can mass market courses at a fraction of traditional competition (school fees, tuition fee etc.).Socio-Economic Aspect Millions of children/grown-ups around the world cannot afford quality education. Their talent remains undiscovered. AukSunLMS can teach/train them for as low as $10 per year. We will introduce an ‘Each-one-Teach-one’ program, wherein our Corporate and affluent clients/subscribers can contribute. (see auksun.com/eSchool/eschooling.html).

Sale Process We train Regional Representatives and Self Employed Teams (SET) for our sales. SETs will engage clients and train them to use AukSunLMS features; making and uploading courses, teaching pupilage through their webpage/s. SETs will earn through subscription of clients’ pupilage. (auksun.com/eSchool/careers ). Additionally, we send bulk emails and invite people to www.auksun.com/eschool. Visitors are directed to Children education, Professional Development or Corporate staff training pages showing catalogued courses. Subscribers are taken to the payment page and added to subscription lists for future follow-up (mailchimp).Website www.auksun.com/eschool is being improved for interactivity. We’ve collaborated with Yahoo (small business enterprise), Google (cloud for work, analytics, sites), Mail Chimp (email campaigns, lists automation), MSOffice, Acrobat, Vidyo, YouTube, Fiver, Online banking, facebook, Paypal, Mobify, SlideShare, Picktochart, WordPress, Shopify, Decision.io, PopMyAds, legaltemplates.net etc.Course Design; designed for the digital era; replacing blackboards using best mobile technology/apps (TIN/SCORM) to create courses, focusing long-term learning. We procure pre-developed quality course material from Canada, UK, U.S. and Australia etc. These are then customized, made interactive and uploaded for sale. (See catalog on eschool.auksun.com). Additionally AukSunLMS develops courses through collaboration with schools and their teachers, and other teachers worldwide (auksun.com/teach.html ). We continuously add courses for everyone’s use anywhere in the world; according to curricula, user-level, teacher preference, student requirements, etc.Services-        Customized web-portals for Institutions Corporations and Teachers (their ambiance, logos, color) giving edge over competition.-        Hands-on / online Training for clients to use AukSunLMS’s learning management.  - So they are up and running in no time.-        Making Courses (videos, voice-over presentations, quizzes, tests, automated emailing system, discussion boards, customized certificates)-        Training clients’ customers (children, parents, professionals, staff) - So the clients feel we are partners to their cause.-        MBTI analyzed learning behavior patterns - to identify ideal methodology for intended learners (introvert/extrovert preferences)-        Connecting independent learners with recruiters and corporations for jobs, Connecting entrepreneurs with funders

Products:

-        CPD for professionals (Finance, HR, Law).-        High gain, pre-made courses (to add value on client’s portals)-        Courses for independent learners-        Paper version courses (for people without internet access)-        Individualized unlimited cloud space to upload teaching material-        Discussion boards-        Motion detection cameras, Overhead projectors, seamless  uploading/streaming software for lectures or seminars.S.W.O.T Analysis-        Strengths: multicultural multilingual promoters - going global is  doable (Canada, UK, Dubai, India, Pakistan etc.)-        Weakness: Volume of subscribers needed to realize gains, hence  the low-price strategy. Internet availability-        Opportunity: People turning to smart-phones and eCommerce.  Rising cost of education-        Threats: Players with better financial muscle moving in first   (Tata, Coursera, Khan Academy) – get the early bird advantage.

Complete Business Plan, modus-operandi, financial forecasts, annexure, access to learning management courses can be provided (email your request to; azeem.khan@auksun.com ).

Credit: Home Schooling, School going children, Entrepreneurs, Executives, Immigrants, e-Teachers

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