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An inclusive and innovative Canada includes Life Sciences

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 11/10/2016 1478741430
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Canada to become a global life sciences leader, with a coordinated, whole of Canada strategy supporting the life sciences ecosystem, with an End to En .... Read more

Canada to become a global life sciences leader, with a coordinated, whole of Canada strategy supporting the life sciences ecosystem, with an End to End strategy, to drive economic growth through new discoveries which save lives, improve patient outcomes and enhance health system performance

Credit: Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies in Canada

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Go North: 10 ideas for innovation, strong and free

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 11/04/2016 1478275088
Tags:
Pick a lane, and stick to it Canada moved up the Olympics standings by focusing more money on fewer sports. Same approach is needed for technolog .... Read more
  1. Pick a lane, and stick to it

Canada moved up the Olympics standings by focusing more money on fewer sports. Same approach is needed for technology. Mike Lazaridis, co-founder of Research in Motion and Quantum Valley Investments, stressed it’s hard for 35 million people to be great at everything. He said we should double down on clusters of excellence. His point: If you’re not in the top 5, you won’t be in the game when it comes to attracting investment and talent.

Idea: Declare artificial intelligence and quantum computing as national priorities, and measure Canada’s success at them globally.

  1. Attract. Retain. Rinse. Repeat.

1 issue was talent. In digital, it’s not a game-changer; it is the game. Why? The biggest expense for any tech company is people. The top question for any investor is people. Trouble is, while Canada has a lot of engineering and start-up people, we’re way behind on “senior talent”?—?people who have taken a $10-million company and 10x’d it. Michael Litt from Vidyard, a video intelligence business, said he has three executives who commute from the United States, because he can’t find the senior talent in Canada.

Retaining such talent matters hugely, too. Ted Livingston, founder of the social messaging company Kik, said he recently asked a University of Waterloo audience, how many graduates planned to stay in the area. Of 500 present, 3 raised their hands. How many planned to go to Silicon Valley? Roughly half.

Once we can retain our top engineers and attract some exceptional, influential senior leaders, the domino effect will be huge. Tax rates have an impact. House prices and creative environments often matter more. Most of all, global talent wants to be around global talent, and often those are the people working for world-class firms and world-class universities. Getting those firms needs to be a priority.

Idea: Mandate a pan-Canadian agency to source, recruit and retain global talent.

  1. Create Canadian headquarters

Small fish need big fish to survive, and Canada’s lost a lot of big fish. We just got back ThomsonReuters, which is moving its executive team from New York to Toronto. That’s huge, as it will lead to all sorts of decisions that benefit Toronto-area firms and talent. British Columbia is driving the same agenda, persuading Chinese firms to use Vancouver as a North American base. Bottom line: global HQs are the big fish. We need to restock the pond.

Idea: Charge a single public-private, federal-provincial agency with the challenge of winning global mandates.

  1. Buy Canadian

Strong HQs lead to more local procurement and talent sourcing. Our banks and insurance companies already do a lot?—?and can do more. So can our big auto parts firms, food producers and retailers. The biggest fish may be government, which can do much better supporting digital entrepreneurs through procurement and partnerships. Several entrepreneurs said they need government to be an early customer, to give them cred when they go abroad. Today, Ottawa spends $9 billion on outside goods and services. A lot more coordination is needed, as too many firms get snagged in a complex procurement process when they should be building products.

Idea: Design a Canadian procurement pact that sets a standard for all large companies and governments.

  1. Sell American

For any tech firm, the U.S. is not just 10 times bigger than Canada; it sets the global standard. If you’re not big there, good luck anywhere. Several panelists admitted their biggest mistake was not going to the U.S. sooner ?— whether it was to look for customers, attract investors or spend time working in the Valley.

Idea: Ensure any new public capital comes with U.S. growth targets.

  1. Declare national problems

Governments can help shape the tech game by setting big horizon goals such as climate change, cybersecurity and immigration?—?and then incenting entrepreneurs with prizes and support to solve those problems. By acting as a broker between private and public sectors, government can also boost funding in key areas and kick-start research. One good sign: Ottawa has committed $1 billion to help develop clean technologies. Mike Lazaridis stressed the importance of strategic philanthropy?—?witness his support of Waterloo’s Perimeter Institute?—?as a further catalyst for government funds. Or consider Google.org: It just announced an Impact Challenge that will award $5 million across 10 Canadian organizations to bring world-changing ideas to life through technology.

Idea: Read 6.

  1. Attract smart capital

The Go North entrepreneurs recognized there’s never been so much capital available to help companies grow. It’s just not always smart capital. Startups need capital that provides a 10-year window to carry great ideas forward, with intellectual support as well as money. Most of Canada’s smart capital now comes from the U.S., where venture firms have a lot more experience getting companies to the world stage. In response, Canadians need to look for investors outside the current ecosystem, and attract angel money from individuals who have street cred. Harley Finkelstein, the COO of Shopify, says the Canadian mindset needs to change, with more focus on secondary liquidity. That’s the pool of money that not only helps firms grow; it rewards founders without forcing them to sell.

Idea: Incent global VC players to expand to Canada.

  1. Attract smart people

Innovation Minister Navdeep Bains reminded the crowd that importing top talent does not take jobs from Canadians. Rather, skilled immigrants?—?entrepreneurs especially?—?add jobs. Trouble is, Canada’s immigration system can take months, or years, to get skilled people across the border. Opportunities don’t wait for months, let alone years. To own the digital podium, we need a fast-track program that gets the right people into the right opportunities at the right moment. Just-in-time immigration.

Idea: Create a new professional visa class that can be co-administered by sectoral groups.

  1. Attract smart mentors

Canada’s got plenty of accelerators and start-up programs; most think they’re doing a pretty good job, too. One gap is mentorship networks. The Go North entrepreneurs said the best mentors are a year older than they are, and still in business. They can also come from established businesses, be they banks or manufacturers. Ugly truth is, the best mentors are people who don’t have time. Time to get ’em engaged.

Idea: Build a Canadian social media platform for entrepreneurs and mentors.

  1. Diversity, digital-style

Canada continues to fall short on gender diversity in business. It’s the same across the tech world, which means there’s a chance for Canada to lead the world. Today, 13.1% of corporate board seats are held by women; 40% of companies don’t have any women on their boards. Start-ups aren’t much better. Despite colleges and universities graduating more and more women in STEM programs, they’re not sticking around the digital ecosystem. The start-up, scale-up and corporate communities can change that picture by attracting a range of students to tech programs, by changing the mindset of what a “typical” engineer looks like, and by embracing diversity of thought.

Idea: Launch a public database to monitor companies, VCs and the sector on gender balance.

Go North: 10 ideas for innovation, strong and free

LinkedIn

October 31, 2016

http://ww2.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/en/2016/10/31/203175047

 

Credit: John Stackhouse, Senior Vice-President – Office of the CEO, Royal Bank of Canada

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Attracting Talent to the Engineering Profession

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/31/2016 1477934271
Tags:
Modernize Federal Skilled Worker Program and express entry programs In order for Canada to continue to show leadership in global migration and to con .... Read more

Modernize Federal Skilled Worker Program and express entry programs

In order for Canada to continue to show leadership in global migration and to continue to attract international talent, it is important for the federal government to continue to modernize their immigration policies by introducing changes to the Federal Skilled Worker Program (FSWP) and express entry programs aimed at economic immigrants. This would ensure that applicants receive an open and comprehensive assessment of their experience and professional education credentials. A standard and reasonable time frame should be set for processing applicants without lowering national standards and a level of efficiency should be in place to withstand fluctuations in the volume of applicants. The federal government should support a FSWP system that facilitates and supports the express entry of skilled and experienced immigrants in order to support industries and professions that are facing skill gaps. This will promote economic prosperity for domestic industries and support Canada’s overall economy.

Equivalency Testing Abroad

Government funding to make equivalency testing for regulated profession available (abroad) prior to arrival would also greatly support efforts in attracting international talent. Individuals arriving in Canada with their credentials pre-assessed and mandatory testing completed prior to their arrival in Canada would be beneficial in making a smooth licensing process for newcomers. By eliminating processing barriers for international applicants, Canadian businesses and governments would be able to effectively attract international talent in order to support Canada’s growing economic needs.

Engaging with Regulated Professions

It is also imperative that the federal government continues to actively engage with regulated professions, like engineering, while they consider policies that could affect the ability of provincial and territorial regulators to effectively integrate qualified internationally trained engineers into the profession. With the ability to effectively integrate qualified newcomers, we strengthen our society, culture, and economy while simultaneously supporting newcomers in their desires to contribute professionally to Canadian communities.

Newcomers are one of the key aspects to innovation in Canada. They bring with them knowledge, enthusiasm, distinctive ideas and unique cultural perspectives that encourage innovative thinking. Research outlines that Canadian businesses and professions witness an increase in innovative thinking and performance with the arrival of newcomers. For example, “Immigrants as Innovators Boosting Canada’s Global Competitiveness” (2010) outlines that immigrants and newcomers to Canada were directly linked to increased innovation performance that benefitted Canada; specifically when analyzing research, culture divisions, business and international business.

However, according to the Conference Board of Canada’s 2015 report Canada currently ranks 14th out of 17 industrialized countries in terms of innovation. Countries throughout the international community are increasingly productive and innovative, which consequently has a large impact on the Canadian workforce and economy.

Innovation is vastly important in the protection of the natural environment, the achievement of high-performing education systems, and the maintenance of a strong and sustainable health care system. Engineers are at the forefront of this innovation and of enhanced productivity throughout countless professional sectors and industries in Canada that are essential to economic growth. Telecommunications, mining, construction and manufacturing, among others, depend on engineering and innovative thinking to remain productive and to uphold public safety. The engineering profession in Canada supports the successful integration of newcomers into the profession as these individuals have a direct link in supporting economic growth and innovation in Canada.

Immigration not only plays a large role in encouraging innovative thinking within Canadian businesses, but it also supports economic growth within Canada; specifically in terms of increased foreign direct investments and trade levels. The Conference Board of Canada outlined in their 2015/2010 report entitled “Immigration is Critical to Canada’s Prosperity,” that foreign direct investment into Canada is greater from those countries that are well represented through immigration. Immigration also positively affected economic growth through trade investments between Canada and the newcomers’ countries of origin.

However, despite the innovative thinking that newcomers bring with them to Canada, as well as their indirect support for Canada’s economic growth, there continue to be several barriers that hinder their ability to effectively contribute to Canadian society. Specifically, newcomers experience a lack of access to many opportunities due to various barriers, including insufficient acknowledgment of their experience abroad and of their foreign qualifications. In order to address these barriers, employers across Canada should create and maintain policies that support the inclusion and retention of immigrants in order to strengthen their innovation agendas.

Engineers Canada has been working diligently to lead the way in order to address these barriers in order to provide support for new Canadians and prospective newcomers looking for successful employment within the engineering profession. Engineers Canada supports the promotion of innovative thinking throughout the profession, to the benefit of both Canada’s economy and society as a whole.

Engineers Canada continuously works with the federal government to ensure that Canada’s immigration system is rigorous, fair and responsive to the economic needs of communities across the country. Engineers Canada also works with the provincial and territorial regulators across Canada to ensure that licensing procedures are transparent, objective and impartial, while simultaneously protecting the public interest. The engineering profession promotes practices that open avenues for newcomers to actively contribute to the labour market, specifically by encouraging diversity within the workforce. Employers who mirror the diversity of their staff to the diversity of the population from which they are chosen are better positioned to meet diverse client or market needs. This can encourage economic growth by strengthening the relationship with diverse international markets and clients.

Focus on Diversity

Engineers Canada is committed to promoting equity and diversity in the engineering profession. In 2012, Engineers Canada committed to the aspirational goal to have 30% of newly licensed engineers (P.Eng.) be women by the year 2030. Engineers Canada is also a member of Canadian Coalition of Women in Science, Trades and Technology (CCWESTT) and supports The National Conference on Women in Engineering (NCWiE).

In 2010, the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and Engineers Canada signed an agreement to encourage First Nations youth to pursue careers in engineering. Engineers Canada will continue to identify opportunities to work with AFN in order to attract talented individuals from Indigenous populations across Canada.

Governments should support profession’s efforts to attract and retain talented individuals from the diverse mosaic which is the Canadian population. The federal government should fund bursaries, mentorship and apprenticeships that encourage members of underrepresented groups to enter into professions across Canada, specifically professions in engineering, science, trades or mathematics. The federal government must continue to work with regulated professions in order to help support and promote diversity as a way to attract talented individuals into Canadian professions.

Fund bursaries, mentorships and apprenticeships for underrepresented groups

One of the most effective ways for Canada to retain global talent and skilled international students is to eliminate cultural and employment barriers for newcomers. The federal government should remain active in taking initiative towards funding bursaries, mentorships, and apprenticeship programs that encourage members of underrepresented groups to pursue careers in engineering and STEM-related disciplines. Employers that blend diversity management and inclusiveness in their workforce can successfully attract foreign talent and encourage home-based employees to embrace diversity. Companies and organizations should have a process in place to effectively assist employees and students through the transition process to Canada.

Continued Support for Foreign Credential Recognition

The federal government should invest in a nationally consistent foreign credential recognition system for regulated professions in order to effectively address existing barriers for potential employees. Newcomers should be recognized for their previous professional experiences and education. Non-recognition of their credentials leads to an underutilization of those individuals’ talents, experiences, and abilities that are beneficial in growing Canada’s economy and society. Prospective immigrants deserve access to credible evaluations of their qualifications and credentials prior to making the important decision to move to Canada.

A framework for a nationally consistent foreign credential recognition system for regulated professions could include:

  1. Guiding principles that regulatory bodies, as well as federal, provincial and territorial governments, are all in consensus with will guide the recognition of foreign credentials;
  2. A standard established for the timely review of individuals’ credentials and qualifications before they arrive in Canada; and
  3. A consistent approach that will see applications for licensing and credential assessment processes increasingly begin in the individual’s country of origin.

Success story: Recognizing foreign qualifications in the engineering profession

The engineering profession in Canada has gone to great lengths to support and recognize newcomers’ foreign qualifications and experiences. Engineers Canada believes that it is a best practice to direct all prospective newcomers interested in practising engineering towards the appropriate professional regulatory body for qualifications assessment prior to immigrating to Canada. Engineering licensing bodies are uniquely qualified to provide the most accurate information to governments during the immigration process of international engineering graduates. Accurate information will also help the graduates be prepared to join the workforce in Canada and will ensure that Canada is in fact getting the skills that it needs to support economic growth.

For more than a decade, Engineers Canada has implemented a project entitled From Consideration to Integration. The goal of this project was to ensure timely licensure for international engineering graduates from when they start considering moving to Canada until the moment they are integrated into both the profession and workforce in Canada. Many initiatives are underway as a result of the success of From Consideration to Integration.

Competency-Based Assessment

solution to a shortage of skilled, professional labour is to improve the integration of foreign-trained professionals into the Canadian workplace. Verifying an individual’s work experience can often be seen as a significant barrier to employment for internationally educated professionals – which in turn can deter internationally trained professionals from applying to work in Canada. Engineers Canada has designed a Competency-Based Assessment Project that is designed to develop a competency-based assessment system for the evaluation of engineering work experience.  This project works to move beyond joint recognition of licenses between provinces and territories in order to develop a key common definition of the standard for licensure as well as a common assessment method.

This assessment system will help to simplify the licensure process, specifically for the engineering profession, by creating a core set of competencies. The Competency-Based Assessment Project has created a requirement that: (1) ensures only qualified individuals are permitted to practice professional engineering; (2) makes it easier for applicants to understand what information must be submitted prior to working within the engineering profession; and (3) allows assessors to make more objective decisions on whether an applicant has met the requirements to work.

The federal government should support competency-based assessment protocols for regulated professions across Canada. With greater clarity and transparency for applicants, assessors, employers and the general public through assessment systems, regulated professions can undertake objective assessments of applicants in order to ensure that the high professional standards set in place are met and maintained. With clear expectations and requirements in place, regulated professions can work towards attracting talented professionals from across the country and within the international community.

Roadmap to Engineering in Canada – Academic Tool

Engineers Canada has developed an online resource, known as the Roadmap to Engineering in Canada; a one-stop online tool that provides up-to-date information for international engineering graduates and newcomers. The information provided includes licensing procedures in Canada, required academic qualifications to work as an engineer, as well as resources that are available prior to their arrival to help guide them through the licensing process in Canada. The academic tool provides a comparison of an individual’s undergraduate engineering education to Canadian undergraduate engineering education. The sole purpose of this tool is to provide newcomers with information about their undergraduate engineering education in order to assist them in making a decision about immigration to Canada. It is not a part of the formal immigration selection process, nor is it part of the engineering licensure process. This available and accessible information can create a smooth application process for newcomers as it directly outlines what individuals need in order to work in their desired field prior to making the decision to immigrate to Canada.

The federal government must continue to support the maintenance of high standards already in place while enhancing international mobility. They must consult regulators when making policy and legislative decisions that could affect the regulators’ ability to protect the interests of their stakeholders and ensure public safety. And the federal government should support professions in developing tools that enable the integration of internationally trained newcomers into their desired profession in Canada.

Credit: Engineers Canada

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ICT Fundamentals for Canada's Innovation Agenda

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/28/2016 1477676733
Tags:
To ensure a successful Innovation Agenda, the Government of Canada must work toward innovating and modernizing the way it operates itself. By making .... Read more

To ensure a successful Innovation Agenda, the Government of Canada must work toward innovating and modernizing the way it operates itself.

By making investments now, modernizing procurement, and bringing the ICT sector on board more frequently and earlier in planning processes, the Government of Canada—as a truly digitally enabled entity—has a real opportunity to make a profound impact on the Canadian economy.

Summary of Recommendations: Digital Government

  1. Invest in today to fuel tomorrow
  • Solve the legacy dilemma by identifying and accounting for all costs needed to maintain the infrastructure, and set aside funds for transition
  • Centralize digital leadership to ensure a whole-of-government approach to its transformation, modernization and digitization initiatives
  • Mind the government talent gap by better understanding the upskilling requirements of government ICT workers, and building programs to support its workforce development requirements
  1. Modernize procurement
  • Create one procurement playbook that reduces duplication, balances cost/value, supports demand and achieves shorter time-to-market
  • Collaborate with industry to develop a procurement policy that fits 21st century requirements and supports socio-economic interests
  1. Build a modern government by tapping into industry first
  • Develop a robust, consistent engagement process with the ICT sector by extending engagement efforts to the pre-planning and final development stages of all ICT-related initiatives
  • Create ICT leadership advisory councils to help guide the Government in transforming and modernizing its infrastructure, while making strong and secure digital leaps forward to innovate public service delivery

ICT FUNDAMENTALS FOR CANADA’S INNOVATION AGENDAReport: ITAC on Digital GovernmentOctober 26, 2016

http://ww2.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/en/2016/10/26/203110636

Credit: Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC)

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Recognize the role that access to housing and the affordability of homeownership play

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/19/2016 1476892350
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When developing a ‘cluster’ governments at all levels recognize the role that access to housing and the affordability of homeownership pla .... Read more

When developing a ‘cluster’ governments at all levels recognize the role that access to housing and the affordability of homeownership play in developing a vibrant community that is an attractive place in which to live. The promotion of innovation clusters should consider housing, and, reciprocally, the National Housing Strategy should consider housing as it relates to the government’s pursuit of innovation clusters and broader economic and competitive goals.

Credit: Canadian Home Builders' Association

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Canada needs more chemistry: bold leadership is needed to attract and win new investments

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/11/2016 1476217838
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An effective innovation strategy should foster the development of products, services, and industries that can best capitalize on the natural resources .... Read more

An effective innovation strategy should foster the development of products, services, and industries that can best capitalize on the natural resources and talent that already exist in our country.

The chemistry sector has an outstanding track record in investment and growth that drives innovation. It employs a highly skilled and educated workforce and plays a critical role in Canada's economic prosperity as the second- largest manufacturing sector exporter and shipper of goods. What the industry needs is for the federal government to recognize the power of chemistry and to act and build a globally competitive investment environment.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/unrestricted/2016/10/ic20161035322631_2034.htm

Canada needs more chemistry: bold leadership is needed to attract and win new investmentsHill TimesOctober 3 2016

Credit: Bob Masterson is the president and CEO of the Chemistry Industry Association of Canada (CIAC)

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Création de clubs régionaux de patenteux, inventeurs, créatifs,ect

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/10/2016 1476143109
Tags:
www.lespatenteuxdebeauce.com ; regroupement d'individus de talents différents, de tous âges créé en Beauce par Neil Mathieu, retraité et son fils .... Read more

www.lespatenteuxdebeauce.com ; regroupement d'individus de talents différents, de tous âges créé en Beauce par Neil Mathieu, retraité et son fils Olivier Mathieu, ingénieur jr en production automatisée. Voir la page facebook : Les patenteux de Beauce

Collectif d'individus sans but lucratif dont la mission est d'aider au développement d'idées ou d'inventions. Les rencontres sont fixées au deuxième dimanche du mois sauf en juillet et août.

Credit: Les Patenteux de Beauce

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End roadblocks to Foreign private equity

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/08/2016 1475962922
Tags: accelerators 
The investment in Canadian private equity firms are discouraged. These firms need a lot of capital and a lack capital have these results: failure to c .... Read more

The investment in Canadian private equity firms are discouraged. These firms need a lot of capital and a lack capital have these results: failure to commercialize much of the country's Research and Development, lost of intellectual capital, low economic growth. the standards of living  will not get better.

To solve the problem:" First, the federal government should end the tax-clearance process that foreign private equity investors must follow when selling shares of a private Canadian company.

Second, to prevent double taxation, the Canada-US tax treaty ought to be amended to provide US limited liability companies the same tax treatment that ordinary US corporations receive when selling shares of a private Canadian company.

 

Third, the federal government should permit tax-free roll over of shares of a Canadian company into shares of a foreign company." (CD Howe  Institute,commentary no 244, February 2007, Financing Canadian innovation,Why  Canada should end Roadblocks to foreign private equity)

With these reforms,the Canadian private equity firms will not  be sold too early,and if needed they will be sold at the highest price possible while having  market leadership.Furthermore, the Canadian venture firms will have greater return on a 10 year period and they will invest more in Canadian start-ups, thus creating a virtuous circle.

 

Credit: CD Howe Institute

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Innovation Starts Here: ICT Fundamentals For Canada's Innovation Agenda

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/03/2016 1475502193
Tags:
As such, ITAC recommends that the Government standardize and increase the CCA from its current rates to 50% for ICT classes of assets, including those .... Read more

As such, ITAC recommends that the Government standardize and increase the CCA from its current rates to 50% for ICT classes of assets, including those related to communications networks equipment and broadband networks.

Therefore, ITAC recommends that the Government seek out industry and government partners to develop the talent, funding vehicles and policies necessary to enable 5G in Canada.

ITAC recommends the Government integrate telecommunications networks and core supporting technologies, like cyber security protections, into its general definition of “infrastructure.”

ITAC recommends that federal education programs and initiatives consider the potential of e-learning as a means of bringing education and training to all Canadians.

The Canadian government needs to do more to ensure Canadians and businesses take cyber security seriously. This should include increasing public education and creating a minimum standard for business, similar to the UK’s Cyber Essentials program.

To address this, the government should find ways to inform, inspire and support SMEs. As an example, this could include creating tax supports for technology consultants working with SMEs, and launching technology demonstration facilities and test factories to help SMEs see firsthand how their operations could be transformed.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/09/nau20169568589393.htm

Innovation Starts Here: Ict Fundamentals For Canada's Innovation Agenda

September 29, 2016

Credit: Information Technology Association of Canada

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If governments want to spur innovation, they need to rethink policy

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/03/2016 1475502061
Tags:
That means that governments could and should focus their efforts in areas like: tax policy (if you innovate and make money, the government won't tax m .... Read more

That means that governments could and should focus their efforts in areas like: tax policy (if you innovate and make money, the government won't tax most of it away); strong intellectual property protection (so that you can protect your idea from imitators long enough to recoup your investment and make a profit); competition policy and free trade (because competitive pressure on companies is the single biggest force driving and rewarding innovation); and finally regulatory policy that doesn't just encourage competition, but allows ease of investment and changes of ownership (because new investors and owners will often bring with them innovative ideas). We do most of these things poorly compared to more innovative economies.

If you let people with ideas make money and reinvest it freely, that is the best innovation policy because it gives the biggest incentives to entrepreneurs to match new ideas with those who need them and those who have the capital to finance them. And unlike most government innovation policy, it isn't limited to fashionable sectors like high tech, but is neutral across all industries. Innovations like fracking, just-in-time inventory control and low-cost air carriers are every bit as important as IT and electronic gadgets.

Minister Bains would be well advised to remember: innovation in policy matters, too.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/unrestricted/2016/09/ic20169201195821_1796.htm

Globe and Mail

September 30 2016

 

Credit: Brian Lee Crowley, managing director of the Macdonald-Laurier Institute

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Innovation depends on the four C's, says U of T President Meric Gertler

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/03/2016 1475501182
Tags:
The recipe for success relies on the "disruptive and unpredictable forces at the intersection of four C's: cities, connections, collaboration and comm .... Read more

The recipe for success relies on the "disruptive and unpredictable forces at the intersection of four C's: cities, connections, collaboration and commitment.”

"Cities with their universities, institutions, and enterprises of every description are magnets for talent…But innovation does not happen overnight.

"Commitment is often the highest hurdle in modern democracies, whose leaders must regularly face anxious electorates with high expectations and short-term timelines. But success requires commitment, along with sustaining investments, as well as a tolerance for risk taking and failure as part of an overall strategy. This strategy must recognize and leverage those unique competitive advantages that are increasingly clustered in a relatively small number of urban regions.

"Undeniably, such commitment takes political courage, a fifth 'C' perhaps."

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/09/nau201692313178696.htm

Innovation depends on the four C's, says U of T President Meric Gertler

UToronto.ca: News

September 26, 2016

Credit: Meric Gertler, University of Toronto President

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B.C. urges Ottawa to fix tech talent gap

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/03/2016 1475500988
Tags:
"Let's let more smart people in.” "If the federal government is absolutely serious about improving innovation ... they will change the way that .... Read more

"Let's let more smart people in.”

"If the federal government is absolutely serious about improving innovation ... they will change the way that we do immigration."

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/unrestricted/2016/09/ic201693911390115_68.htm

B.C. urges Ottawa to fix tech talent gap

Globe and Mail

September 26 2016

Credit: Christy Clark, B.C. Premier

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ITAC urges bold government action to deliver successful Innovation Agenda

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/03/2016 1475500900
Tags:
The federal government must be willing to make substantive policy changes and investments if it wants the forthcoming Innovation Agenda to succeed, co .... Read more

The federal government must be willing to make substantive policy changes and investments if it wants the forthcoming Innovation Agenda to succeed, concludes the first in a series of papers being issued by the Information Technology Association of Canada (ITAC).

 

In the 2017 Budget, ITAC is urging the government to create a digital leadership advisory council and a new agency, Digital Service Canada; change the capital cost allowance rate to incent more private sector digital infrastructure; enable 5G technology in Canada; fund telehealth services in urban and remote communities; fund ITAC's CareerMash student digital skills initiative; fund experiential learning opportunities within the technology sector; and, hold a holistic consultation on taxation and innovation.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/09/nau201691314807481.htm

Re$earch Money

September 22, 2016

Credit: Information Technology Association of Canada

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Innovation at the heart of Canadian agriculture

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/03/2016 1475500814
Tags:
When it comes to the SR&ED tax credit, administrative costs associated with it are increasingly burdensome, resulting in research and development beco .... Read more

When it comes to the SR&ED tax credit, administrative costs associated with it are increasingly burdensome, resulting in research and development becoming more challenging. The process to make a submission to the program needs to be streamlined if the objectives of the program remain to reward innovation.

Often, those applying for the SR&ED credit will pay anywhere from $30,000 to $100,000 to get the application done. If one assumes 10 applicants hire external consultants for their submission, the combined amount could be upwards of $1 million going into administration costs rather than innovation itself. Perhaps it is the cost of doing business but these are dollars AMC members would rather see invested into R&D.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/unrestricted/2016/09/ic2016935484826_2034.htm

Innovation at the heart of Canadian agriculture

Hill Times

September 26 2016

Leah Olson, MBA, MPPPA, is president of the Agricultural Manufacturers of Canada, a national industry association fostering and promoting the growth and development of the agricultural equipment manufacturing industry in Canada.

Credit: Leah Olson, MBA, MPPPA, is president of the Agricultural Manufacturers of Canada

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The case for SBIR how government's strategic needs can seed small business innovation

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/03/2016 1475500630
Tags:
What mechanism could make government procurement an enabler of innovation? Part of the answer is a Canadian Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) .... Read more

What mechanism could make government procurement an enabler of innovation? Part of the answer is a Canadian Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

Revamping federal procurement pro-cesses to include a Canadian SBIR program would have the following benefits:

  •  address the need of early stage companies to access up-front working capital;
  • enable companies to scale-up their innovation capacity from concept through to pre-commercialization;
  • stimulate responses to grand challenges' relevant to government departments;
  • provide the government with made-in-Canada solutions that meet its needs for innovative products and services; and,
  • bring together teams of R&D performers (researchers, technicians, developers and marketing experts) working to solve the government's own procurement needs.

Implemented effectively, a Canadian SBIR program has the potential to stimulate early stage innovation and R&D in small business, increase market-oriented, commercializable products and technologies and, grow the number of global patents for Canadian techniques and technologies.

Integrating a SBIR program as part of government procurement would increase alignment of Canadian innovation technologies and products with the needs of government, while nurturing a critical mass of capability in areas of strategic importance.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/09/nau20169599285877.htm

Re$earch Money

September 22, 2016

 

Nobina Robinson is CEO of Polytechnics Canada and was a member of Expert Panel on the Review of Federal Support to Business R&D (2010-2011).

Carl Byers is Chief Strategy Officer and Co-Founder of Contextere.

Credit: Nobina Robinson / Carl Byers

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Zoran Stankovic, str. Despta Stevana 4/14, 11300 Smederevo, Rep. of Serbia

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 10/01/2016 1475335152
Respected, In fact, my idea, "Extinguishing forest fires (Group A) on inaccessible areas"   contains three invention : 1. material (fantastic new .... Read more

Respected,

In fact, my idea, "Extinguishing forest fires (Group A) on inaccessible areas"  

contains three invention :

1. material (fantastic new ecologycal dry powder) - cheap components,

2. device (one - time, made from self degradable ecological Polymer) for cover

    area 100 sqm of forest with 2,5 kg powder - (aprx. $30/1), and

3. method for the fastest and effective application of powder exactly on fire in every

    inaccessible terains (distant mountaines, no roads), incomparably more efficient than

    water and foam from planes and helicopters  - without new investment of money.

Advantages:

- After total firefighting, because powder first extinguished all flames (7. times more effective than water) and after then covering the glowing trees (like scum), robs them of all the heat and isolate from a new flame, devices and powder become organic fertilizer, and revitalize the burnt soil and vegetation.

- The biggest existing speed of application, and the terrible efficiency deprivation of oxygen,

   with simultaneous suppression of free radicals, simply not allow time that a small fire becomes large - disastrous for biodiversity, wood mass, minings, settlements, etc.

- Price for action. Also, there not need the presence of people - firefighters and equipment.

We need financial support for patenting in Canada, and production in Serbia for export.

Best Regards,

Zoran Stankovic

 

Credit: Engineer of thermo dynamics, expert for high temp. and Chemical technician

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ajouter une question d'innovation dans l'entrée expresse et impliquer les provinces

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/29/2016 1475162682
Tags:
Bonjour, Comme j' ai déposé ma demande d'immigration par voie entrée expresse ,je me demande si le gouvernement de l'immigration et réfugiés peu .... Read more

Bonjour,

Comme j' ai déposé ma demande d'immigration par voie entrée expresse ,je me demande si le gouvernement de l'immigration et réfugiés peut ajouter une question pour  tester la faculté d'innovation et l'apport de nouvelles idées chez les  candidats qui déposent leurs demande de l'immigration par voie entrée expresse au Canada en impliquant aussi les provinces . 

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Target long-term investment from world-leading foreign firms, and support the start-ups they need

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/29/2016 1475159994
With increased political uncertainty in both advanced and emerging economies, Canada is well-positioned as a safe hedge and desirable location for inv .... Read more

With increased political uncertainty in both advanced and emerging economies, Canada is well-positioned as a safe hedge and desirable location for investment. Canada's diversity and vibrancy is also a strength for attracting and retaining top-tier employees. But how should Canada seize these opportunities? Just saying that we are open for business is not enough to secure substantial new investment. A coherent and targeted approach would make it more clear to foreign firms what the government's long-term intentions are.

The era of specialized national champions has largely passed, giving way to a global corporate structure that is dominated by conglomerates that are increasing their breadth through frequent high-profile acquisitions. These dominant firms are not necessarily the primary driivers of innovative R&D in the global economy. This distinction arguably belongs to start-ups. But a broader analysis of the medium-well trajectory of successful start-ups points towards a notable trend.

In the past 15 years, rarely has a start-up succeeded on a global scale and then gone on to become a corporate giant of its own. Instead, almost all high-profile and innovative start-ups have been acquired by dominant incumbents. These start-ups spring from the ingenuity of their founders, and are supported by the academic and business clusters which they are cultivated in. Governments in Canada have commendably supported the development and acceleration of these clusters, but have not always communicated an objective for this support beyond helping these firms to scale up.

Clear and frank messaging from governments about their objectives for investments in innovation and start-ups could send a clearer message to the dominant global firms who will likely eventually own the most successful of these start-ups. Essentially, governments should send signals that even greater investments will be directed to innovative clusters that are more likely to attract the long-term investment of leading global firms in Canada. Moreover, as part of government efforts to attract these companies to increase the size of their operations in Canada, governments should indicate that corresponding to new foreign investment, they would be willing to increase targeted investments to relevant start-ups in the sector that the new investor operates in.

This complementary approach of fusing government support for innovation with government efforts to attract foreign investment is promising because it explicitly recognizes the long-term goals of both leading firms and start-ups. But importantly, the long-term focus of such an approach would also strongly support the ultimate objective of creating more cutting edge jobs that stay, or even move to, Canada. 

Given current global conditions, Canada should be a destination of choice for both world-leading companies and top-tier employees. Articulating a long-term vision that is friendly to corporate giants and start-ups alike could increase the probability of a greater presence for both in Canada. If the government can make it clear that it understands this symbiotic relationship, and that it aims to advance these relationships in a coordinated fashion, that should send a convincing message to all that Canada is the right place to pursue innovation over the long-term.

Credit: See the special report in the September 17 2016 edition of The Economist.

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12 Recommandations pour faciliter INNOVATION dans Villes & Gouvernements (FED / PROV / TERR)

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/29/2016 1475153133
Tags: innovation 
Bonjour,   Une conférence de portée internationale sur l'INNOVATION, tenue à l'ENAP-Montréal le 11 mai 2016, a permis l'identification de 12 reco .... Read more

Bonjour,

 

Une conférence de portée internationale sur l'INNOVATION, tenue à l'ENAP-Montréal le 11 mai 2016, a permis l'identification de 12 recommandations pouvant aider à faciliter l'innovation publique.

 

http://recherche.enap.ca/fr/lectureNouvelle.aspx?idNews=27549#.V9lmM0-FMdU

 

Article court :

 

https://pmiquebec.qc.ca/index.php/articles-du-mois/548-innovation-publique-ere-numerique

 

Bonne lecture,

 

Pr. Yvan Lauzon, MBA

newpmp2.0@gmail.com

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12 Recommendations to facilitate INNOVATION in Cities & Government (FED / PROV / TERR)

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/29/2016 1475152939
Tags: innovation 
Hello,   An international conference on INNOVATION, held at ENAP- Montreal May 11, 2016, allowed the identification of 12 recommendations that can he .... Read more

Hello,

 

An international conference on INNOVATION, held at ENAP- Montreal May 11, 2016, allowed the identification of 12 recommendations that can help to facilitate innovation in the Public sector.

 

http://recherche.enap.ca/fr/lectureNouvelle.aspx?idNews=27549#.V9lmM0-FMdU

 

Short article:

 

https://pmiquebec.qc.ca/index.php/articles-du-mois/548-innovation-publique-ere-numerique

 

Good reading in English or French,

 

Pr. Yvan Lauzon, MBA

newpmp2.0@gmail.com

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How innovation-based work permits could help Canadian businesses stay globally competitive (BetaKit.com September 21, 2016)

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/26/2016 1474899477
Tags:
To be competitive in our global economy, Canadian businesses need the right people and access to critical skills to deliver results quickly. Unfortuna .... Read more

To be competitive in our global economy, Canadian businesses need the right people and access to critical skills to deliver results quickly. Unfortunately, the battle for such talent is fierce and many employers in the Canadian startup and innovation space struggle to attract and retain key workers. In fact, the Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC) predicts that, by 2019, Canada will need an additional 182,000 skilled information and communications technology workers alone to meet the domestic needs of employers.With the pervasive skills shortages in key sectors, employers often need to turn to foreign workers. However, it has become increasingly evident that Canada's economic immigration policy does not adequately support the specific talent needs of startup and innovative companies, thereby hindering their growth and plans.An immigration solution must be developed based on a policy rationale that supports Canadian innovation and economic growth.A feasible solution would be for IRCC to create an 'innovation-based' work permit category, exempt from an LMIA pursuant to Section 205, for workers in the innovation space based on the anticipated benefits to the Canadian Innovation Ecosystem. Policy considerations for innovation based work permits may include: developing Canada's innovation ecosystem; supporting significant innovation projects and ideas; growing Canada's innovation footprint internationally; attracting foreign investment and talents; enabling skills transfer, training and new job creation for Canadians; and stimulating business growth. In developing the criteria for the exemption, IRCC policymakers should consult with innovation experts, academics, businesses and industry advisors. While a broad LMIA-exempt work permit category currently exists for workers that provide "significant" social, cultural and economic benefit to Canada, there is a need for a specific exemption that addresses the uniqueness and value of Canadian innovation.If the government is truly committed to making innovation an intrinsic Canadian value, it must carve out a bolder, more aggressive immigration policy to support our innovation and startup culture. The timing seems right, with a Minister of Immigration who has a strong economic background and a government that has prioritized innovation to be a national priority. In fact, the policy rationale supporting innovation-based work permits is entirely consistent with the Federal Government's Innovation Agenda which seeks to establish Canada as an innovation leader and improve the ease of doing business in Canada.Additionally, Canada could benefit significantly in attracting new startup ideas, entrepreneurs, and investors, by promoting an efficient and focused immigration strategy designed to support the growth of new businesses in the innovation space.http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/09/nau201695411168791.htm

Credit: Naumaan Hameed, Partner at KPMG Law

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Consultations sur le Programme d'innovation : mémoire

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/26/2016 1474899161
Tags:
http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/09/nau201692411481746.htm Les universités recommandent :•    Des investissements sout .... Read more

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/09/nau201692411481746.htm

Les universités recommandent :•    Des investissements soutenus et porteurs de changements dans la recherche axée sur la découverte par l'intermédiaire de ses organismes subventionnaires afin que le Canada retrouve des niveaux de financement concurrentiels à l'échelle internationale et progresse de façon importante pour regagner le troisième rang des pays de l'OCDE en ce qui concerne les DIRDES.•    Un financement pluriannuel soutenu pour la Fondation canadienne pour l'innovation afind'appuyer ses programmes actuels, et confier à la Fondation le mandat d'élaborer et de mettre en oeuvre une stratégie nationale en matière de grands projets scientifiques.•    De mécanismes de soutien qui associent des enveloppes réservées pour permettre la collaboration internationale et multidisciplinaire des chercheurs à des démarches harmonisées et des politiques souples au sein des organismes subventionnaires pour favoriser et appuyer les projets d'intégration et de collaboration.Les universités recommandent :•    Une hausse de l'aide financière fédérale aux étudiants autochtones et des initiatives des établissements d'enseignement pour réduire considérablement l'écart entre Canadiens autochtones et non autochtones en matière de taux de fréquentation de l'université au coursdes 10 prochaines années.•    L'appui à un plus grand nombre d'étudiants autochtones pour qu'ils entreprennent des études aux cycles supérieurs et au niveau postdoctoral, l'augmentation du nombre de professeurs et de chercheurs autochtones, et l'augmentation de leur participation à l'innovation future du Canada.•    Un investissement dans de nouvelles mesures, comme des bons et des crédits d'impôt, pour inciter les employeurs -- surtout les PME et les organisations à but non lucratif -- à créer plus de stages rémunérés dans toutes les disciplines et à résoudre les difficultés qui les empêchent d'offrir ce typed'expériences aux étudiants.•    Une augmentation à 50 000 le nombre d'étudiants universitaires qui effectuent chaque année un séjour d'études à l'étranger d'ici 2022 -- notamment les possibilités d'apprentissage dansdes pays émergents et d'autres qui sont des partenaires stratégiques.•    Faciliter la venue de talents étrangers dans les universités canadiennes en simplifiant le processus d'obtention de permis de travail temporaire dans le cadre du Programme de mobilité internationale.•    Une exemption élargie à toutes les embauches à des postes contribuant à l'entreprise universitaire, dont les professeurs, les chercheurs, les agrégés de recherche, les médecins universitaires et les administrateurs de haut rang des universités conformément à une Étude d'impact sur le marché du travail dans le cadre du Programme de mobilité internationale.•    Une élimination du critère du système de points d'Entrée express exigeant une offre d'emploi ayant fait l'objet d'une Étude d'impact sur le marché du travail ou réduire le nombre de points accordés pour une offre d'emploi ayant fait l'objet d'une étude et permettre d'accorder une plus grande valeur au critère de capital humain afin d'évaluer adéquatement les demandes des candidats à la résidence permanente, notamment celles des professeurs étrangers et des étudiants étrangers diplômés des universités canadiennes.•    L'allocation de ressources afin que les délais de traitement des demandes de permis d'études soient concurrentiels à l'échelle mondiale, pour faire du Canada la destination de choix des étudiants les plus brillants.Les universités recommandent :•    Du soutien en recherche-développement (R-D) pendant la phase de démarrage pour faire le lien entre l'idée initiale et les capitaux de risque nécessaires à sa concrétisation pendant le processus de commercialisation.•    Offrir un soutien ciblé pour favoriser l'incubation et l'accélération sur les campus et faciliter l'accès au capital de risque.•    Revoir l'équilibre entre les mesures d'aide directe et indirecte et élargir les programmes de bons qui aident les entreprises à pallier leurs lacunes internes en matière de R-D pour les inciter à collaborer avec les universités.Les universités recommandent :•    L'élaboration d'une stratégie nationale axée sur les grappes exigeant que tous les intervenantstouchés -- entreprises, universités, gouvernements -- participent au processus de demandes concurrentielles pour déterminer les soutiens appropriés.•    Les critères utilisés pour décider quelles grappes soutenir doivent également être ouverts et inclusifs (et non prédéterminés en fonction des régions et des établissements)et pourraient s'accompagner de critères spécialisés pour ne pas négliger des grappes émergentes qui ont le potentiel d'être concurrentielles sur la scène mondiale, en particulier celles situées dans de petites agglomérations en région.

Credit: Universities Canada (16 septembre 2016)

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always inproving

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/24/2016 1474711380
Tags:
to take  and inprove what ever field your in .like for eg. a mouse trap there gotta be ways to inproving  the mouse trap
Credit: PHILLIP CLINTON

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Attracting talent and investment into Canada's mining industry

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/23/2016 1474660736
Tags: mining 
More talent and investment can be attracted into the Canadian mining industry if there is: Effective marketing and communications that demonstrate .... Read more

More talent and investment can be attracted into the Canadian mining industry if there is:

  1. Effective marketing and communications that demonstrate the modernization of the mining industry to make it more attractive to new generations and to the general public. Share results and outcomes from project. Show progress/advances on innovations develop and communicate what it takes to turn an idea into a market ready product.

Reducing the impact of the mining industry on the environment and making the Canadian industry the leader in the development of environmentally benign technologies. This process can be accelerated by investing in Canada’s mining innovation support ecosystem

Credit: Centre for Excellence In Mining Innovation, CEMI

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Partnerships

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/21/2016 1474478162
Tags:
-There is a need for partnership incentives and tax rebates for companies in order to provide assistance and direction for First Nation communities. - .... Read more

-There is a need for partnership incentives and tax rebates for companies in order to provide assistance and direction for First Nation communities.

-Have resources/infrastructure in communities to establish businesses (ie. road building, construction etc.) there is a lack of Indigenous businesses and the need for more guidance for business proposals.

Credit: Indigenopus innovation roundtable hosted by MP Don Rusnak

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Small business SEED Fund

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/21/2016 1474478048
Tags:
Indigenous Small Business SEED Fund-Pilot Project With poverty rates well above the national average, First Nation people are faced with monumental ob .... Read more

Indigenous Small Business SEED Fund-Pilot Project

With poverty rates well above the national average, First Nation people are faced with monumental obstacles to entrepreneurs(both indigenous and non) require a 10-15% owner’s contribution to access business financing such as grants or loans.

When you don’t have enough money to survive, let alone save any money, yet you have a great idea for a business, ALL programs become inaccessible.

This pilot program would be designed to supply qualified business plans, which have been pre-approved for commercial financing/entrepreneur grants. This approach will greatly reduce the overall risk of the SEED fund, and pass along the cost of assessment on to the business financing organization.  The SEED money would be a non-refundable business grant designed as the owner’s contribution which is to be levered for additional funding.

 

 

Credit: Indigenous roundtable hosted by MP Don Rusnak

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Innovation round tables successful harvest of ideas

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/16/2016 1474049164
Tags:
It is vital our Government works to ensure Canadian businesses have the tools and resources they need to succeed. After meeting with our innovators an .... Read more

It is vital our Government works to ensure Canadian businesses have the tools and resources they need to succeed. After meeting with our innovators and entrepreneurs in the Bay of Quinte region, I know there are huge opportunities for growth.

Ideas from the first meeting included:

  • We work better together as a region, and should be meeting together more often
  • We need better digital infrastructure in rural communities to enable business growth.
  • We should advertise more for immigrants, who are eager to invest, but might not know about us.
  • We should promote and celebrate entrepreneurship like we do hockey, so that we will get more young people interested and involved.
  • We are global leaders in hockey, and can be global leaders in entrepreneurship if kids get interested at a young age.

Ideas from the second meeting included:

  • Improve access to capital in the early stages for a business to get going, and also working capital to expand when they reach that point. This could include mandating that banks have to lend a certain percentage of their money to Canadian businesses, or could include government-backed loans.
  • Banks and government should have a longer term approach, rather than looking quarter to quarter or election to election.
  • Make a significant investment in the trades to benefit rural areas, including through apprenticeships, since there is a need for skilled talent in rural areas.

Make it easier for entrepreneurs to access trade shows abroad in order to gain foreign investment or access to foreign markets.

Innovation round tables successful harvest of ideas: MPs, Brighton Independent, September 15 2016

 

Credit: Liberal MPs Neil Ellis and Mike Bossio

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Transitioning Graduates to the Workforce

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/15/2016 1473948814
Tags:
Transitioning and integrating young Canadians into the labour market means investment is needed from government, post-secondary institutions, and the .... Read more

Transitioning and integrating young Canadians into the labour market means investment is needed from government, post-secondary institutions, and the private sector. Not all young people are able to successfully make the transition into the labour market despite having education and qualifications. In Canada and other OECD countries, this group is identified as “Poorly Integrated New Entrants”, or (PINEs), and they represent a potential source of talent for companies wishing to hire and expand, but companies and youth need assistance in making those connections between young people and jobs.

This group of youth often face stereotypes, diversity barriers, a lack of available career services, skills mismatches, and obstacles to earning and working while studying.[1] They find themselves frequently moving between temporary jobs or unemployment, even when the economy is growing.

In an extensive study on this specific group of youth, the Canadian Career Development Foundation makes the following 8 recommendations that the federal government should implement to support the reduction of Canadian PINEs:[2]

  1. A well-coordinated, highly visible youth school-to-work transition strategy at the national level;
  2. Further research into Canadian PINEs;
  3. Consideration of a four-pronged approach to PINE reduction that would include post-graduate, early intervention, demand-side, and diversity strategies;
  4. Increase access for all youth to career education and a range of work experiences;
  5. Increase access to apprenticeships and to Vocational Education and Training (VET) and dual systems;
  6. An employer Consultation and Engagement Strategy;
  7. Focus on local labour market needs; and
  8. Evaluate programs and policies with a database for all to share and learn;

(CASA supports these recommendations, and believes that implementing them will substantially help youth integrate into the labour market.

A better understanding of PINEs would help the government address issues around youth employment into the future, but there are already made-in-Canada solutions available. For example, under the Quebec law to Promote Workforce Skills Development, employers are mandated to spend 1% of total payroll on training such as formal courses, apprenticeships, salaries to interns, and other workforce development programs. Those that do not meet those obligations are required to pay a contribution equal to the difference between 1% of its total payroll and the amount spent on training to the Workforce Skills Development and Recognition Fund[3].

The policy also ensures that this would not put a large amount of financial burden on small business; employers with a payroll of less than $1 million are not subject to the legislation. Employers can get a certificate that attests to the quality of their training initiatives and then not have to report training initiatives annually to Revenu Quebec. Research on the effect of this policy carried out by Benoit Dostie and Marie-Pierre Pelletier (SRI-2005) found that Quebec has more formal training than all other provinces (with the exception of Saskatchewan) and that formal training has a greater positive impact on productivity than informal training[4].

This policy addresses what could be described as Canada’s “employer training gap”. Canada spends significantly less than the United States on learning and development for employees, roughly 64 cents for every dollar spent in the states. This would help to reverse the downward trend in spending on training by employers, as well. According to Conference Board of Canada statistics, spending (in constant dollars) has declined by about 40%. This peaked in 1993 at $1,207 per employee and dropped to $705 in 2013[5].

CASA believes that the private sector must play a larger role in attracting, developing and retaining talent. That is why CASA believes that the federal government should adopt the model used in Quebec to create a Canada Training Incentive. This would provide young people leaving their post-secondary educations with the necessary support to have a successful transition to the workforce.

[1] Bell, D. & Benes, K. Transitioning Graduates to Work: Improving the Labour Market Success of Poorly Integrated New Entrants (PINEs) in Canada. Op. Cit., note 5, p.vi-vii.

[2] Ibid, p 37-39.

[3] Editeur Officiel du Quebec, An Act to Promote Workforce Skills Development and Recognition, updated Dec 2015, Quebec, retrieved from: http://www2.publicationsduquebec.gouv.qc.ca/dynamicSearch/telecharge.php?type=2&file=/D_8_3/D8_3_A.html

[4] Industry Canada, Adjustments in Markets for Skilled Workers in Canada: A Synthesis of Key Findings and Policy Implications, 2011, Ottawa, accessed online: https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/eas-aes.nsf/eng/ra02069.html

[5] Munro, Daniel, Conference Board of Canada, Developing Skills: Where are Canada’s Employers? March 20 2014, Ottawa, Accessed online: http://www.conferenceboard.ca/topics/education/commentaries/14-03-20/developing_skills_where_are_canada_s_employers.aspx

Credit: The Canadian Alliance of Student Associations

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Agricultural Institute of Canada

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 09/06/2016 1473190546
Tags:
A stronger strategy to coordinate research priorities and strategies among stakeholders will reduce risk of duplication and produce infrastructure eff .... Read more

A stronger strategy to coordinate research priorities and strategies among stakeholders will reduce risk of duplication and produce infrastructure efficiencies. This will result in a better return on investment and therefore better incentive to invest in research.

Moreover, defining how progress towards outcomes will be measured is of equal importance to the establishment of research priorities and strategies. Monitoring the impact of R&D in all sectors will help research institutions promote what has been achieved for the public good, attract potential investors, develop goal-specific research initiatives and assess research projects based on their potential impact.

Credit: Agricultural Institute of Canada

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Invest in Community, NGO, Civil Society led partnerships

Question:How can businesses, institutions and governments attract talent and investment?
on 08/31/2016 1472683186
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We need to build on the SSHRC Community University Research Alliance model to invest in NGO and Civil Society led partnerships to address hard, comple .... Read more

We need to build on the SSHRC Community University Research Alliance model to invest in NGO and Civil Society led partnerships to address hard, complex, socio-economic issues that combine scientific rigour with community knowledge and action.  And these partnerships need to be linked up and integrated into a National Social Innovation Research Program rather than left as fragmented projects mostly benefiting academics. 

Credit: Vancouver Island Community Investment Cooperative. Laloca Fair Trade Social Enterprise.

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