Global science excellence

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Sustaining Life in a Harsh Environment: A Canadian Project for Mars Habitats, Northern Communities, and Food Security in the Face of Ongoing Climate Change

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 12/01/2016 1480626676
To indefinitely provide a secure, healthy food source in a resource-limited environment is the single largest scientific and technological challen .... Read more

To indefinitely provide a secure, healthy food source in a resource-limited environment is the single largest scientific and technological challenge preventing the establishment of independent human colonies elsewhere in the solar system. The need to rely on intermittent resupply of nutrients is a critical survival risk for remote settlements not only in space, but also in Canada's North.  As a world leader in controlled environment agriculture, Canada has the capability to address this multidisciplinary challenge in an incremental program that will yield immediate benefits to our agricultural industry and to the food security of remote Northern settlements. 

The innovative technologies needed for resource-efficient agriculture will not only enable future semi-permanent extraterrestrial habitats, but will also help the terrestrial greenhouse industry to deal with the effects of climate change, and the increasing costs of energy and labour, by reducing water usage, increasing nutrient recycling, and developing automated horticultural systems.

Recommendation:  A scalable prototype operational Mars food production system could be built with current technology in a Northern distribution centre for $2-10 Million to serve as a testbed for space technologies while also addressing food security, nutrition and health issues across Canada's north. By reducing the amount of food imported and reinvesting this money in northern jobs and infrastructure, this program has undeniable and immediate socio-economic benefits to Canada.

For more information on the market and feasibility assessment: http://nwtresearch.com/projects/archived-projects/agnorth

Credit: University of Guelph Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility; Aurora Research Institute

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Turbo Charge Emerging Growth in Printable, Flexible and Wearable Electronics

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 12/01/2016 1480608539
Printable, flexible and wearable electronics (PE) is an emerging market already worth tens of billions worldwide. PE lies at the convergence of severa .... Read more

Printable, flexible and wearable electronics (PE) is an emerging market already worth tens of billions worldwide. PE lies at the convergence of several industries in which Canada has a strong track record – advanced materials, micro-electronics, information and communications technologies, printing and advanced manufacturing.

The Canadian industry sector has the expertise, innovation and opportunity to revolutionize the electronics industry, for substantial socio-economic benefits across Canada and abroad. More than 250 domestic organizations that we know of are active in the space. The majority of these are startups and young SMEs, but we also have strong Canadian & global companies located in Canada adding such capabilities.

In the attached doc, we discuss how the government framework for supporting such an emerging technology sector must adapt and adjust to provide the boost a young industry needs to achieve its global growth potential and generate wealth and jobs for Canada's knowledge-based economy.

Credit: XRCC, Cooledge Lighting, Memtronik Innovations, NRC, ICI, INO

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Ma participation a l’édifice Canada

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 11/29/2016 1480458339
Tags:
A mon avis, il ne peut y avoir d'excellence scientifique à l'échelle mondiale à long terme sans une franche révolution spirituelle. Cela signifier .... Read more

A mon avis, il ne peut y avoir d'excellence scientifique à l'échelle mondiale à long terme sans une franche révolution spirituelle. Cela signifierait en quelque sorte mettre la charrue avant les bœufs. Je ne parle pas des religions de routine ni de la théologie dépassée qu'on enseigne dans les universités d'ici, car ces choses ne sont que des recherches superficielles de Dieu, qui n'avancent pas la société; mais de la christologie, qui est une voie par excellence pour atteindre tout objectif. 

En regardant de près l'évolution de la société Canadienne, je remarque qu'il y a comme un déni de Christ dans les mentalités. Alors qu'il est clairement établi que toute la science de Dieu commence par son Christ et finit en lui, et sans lui l'homme ne peut de lui-même faire quelque chose qui puisse émerveiller.

Prenons l'exemple de deux grandes nations fortement industrialisées de ce monde (USA et le Chine), qui pratiquent l'un la spiritualité de la droite de Dieu et l'autre la spiritualité de sa gauche, nous constatons qu'ils sont respectivement première et deuxième économie. Le Canada, pour se hisser au premier rang mondial, le gouvernement Canadien doit a son tour se lancer en outsider à la course derrière eux, et en appliquer véritablement le coté droit de la dualité Divine.

Je suggère au gouvernement Canadien de mettre au programme de toutes ses universités pour tous les étudiants confondus, l'étude approfondie de la christologie pour l'ouverture d'esprit de tous ses intellectuels et chercheurs. Ainsi, ils pourront parvenir jusqu'au monde de la perfection invisible de Dieu et réaliser dans le concret les grandes ambitions du Canada.    

Credit: Jean-Marie Ayissi, Chercheur libre en christologie et Consultant spirituel, site: www.lamparo.org

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Encouraging innovation wherever it occurs

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 11/04/2016 1478267305
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Colleges and institutes in Canada are home to 763 specialized research centres providing innovative research and products for local business partners. .... Read more

Colleges and institutes in Canada are home to 763 specialized research centres providing innovative research and products for local business partners. We can amplify the impact of college and institute applied research by investing in and creating new Innovation Services Hubs at colleges and institutes across the country. These hubs will capitalize upon both college and institute relationships with business and community partners and the strength of college and institute research to provide cluster partners, local incubators and accelerators with a single point of entry to the resources and facilities available on campus and offer direct support to student and community entrepreneurs.

 

Canada must enable and encourage innovation wherever it occurs – in all sectors, at all scales, in all regions, and in each and every community where Canadians aspire to find the good-paying jobs that will help grow the middle class. Within existing and emerging clusters, it is crucial that the strengths and contributions of all players and assets be identified, expanded and used to their fullest potential. Clusters in areas such as advanced manufacturing, nanotechnology, construction technology, agriculture, environmental technology / biotechnology, food technology, and healthcare technology are currently supported by 30 Technology Access Centres (TACs) located at 27 colleges and institutes.

 

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are also a significant source of untapped innovation potential. They represent 99.7% of all Canadian firms, employ 90.3% of the private sector workforce and yet account for just 27% of total R&D expenditures. SME owners are natural innovators and many of their businesses are ready to scale up operations within Canada, work with larger firms within supply chains, and expand exports to international markets. SMEs are willing to invest in the digital technology and R&D required to generate growth and contribute to global value chains, but first and foremost, they have to focus on keeping their firms profitable and minimizing overhead. Accessing federal support for R&D can be daunting and building in-house capacity – both in terms of equipment and expertise – is rarely feasible.

 

Innovation beyond the private sector represents another important area of opportunity. The public and not-for-profit sectors can generate significant economic and social benefits in the form of tax-payer savings and improved health and social outcomes. Healthcare is an area that offers great innovation potential, with health expenditures consuming over 10% of GDP10 and pressures increasing due to an aging population. There is an urgent need to invest in research that re-thinks healthcare delivery, embeds digital technology and disseminates new techniques, processes and services.

 

“As the population ages, there will be a greater premium on seamless delivery of multi-disciplinary care across diverse settings, not least the patient’s place of residence.”

- Naylor Report (Unleashing Innovation: Excellent Healthcare for Canada), 2015

 

Currently, funding limitations and the complex array of programs offered by multiple funders are inhibiting the growth potential of the applied research enterprise in Canada’s colleges and institutes and stifling partners’ investments in innovation. In its pre-budget submission to the Standing Committee on Finance, Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan) called for a significant increase in the applied research funding envelope available to colleges, from $75M a year to $300M ramped up over five years, and the creation of new programs that are more responsive to the innovation opportunities presented by research partners and recognize the proven capacity of college applied research.

 

Read more in CICan’s full submission to the Innovation Agenda here: http://bit.ly/2ebHwvv

Credit: Colleges and Institutes Canada

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Research & Develop "What comes Next?"

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/22/2016 1477155288
The Next Technical ‘Shift’ is a simple one, just as it has usually been, a culmination on Techniques/Findings/etc, which Create or Conclud .... Read more

The Next Technical ‘Shift’ is a simple one, just as it has usually been, a culmination on Techniques/Findings/etc, which Create or Conclude, in a massive bend of how things are done, an answer that is Autonomous in its ability to change everything.

“It is not the next (insert things) that the World really needs or cares that much about, it will be the next technical 'shift' that somebody is going to come up with that will automatically change everything. It does not even have to too complicated, just completely new.”

I was spurred on by a Question which was asked to me by Mr. Beattie, put in such a way, that I’ve since forgotten its exact wording. Subconsciously I quite enjoyed the Challenge of coming up with an answer, yet I was surprised at how quickly I had a solid example; a collection of similar Ideas I had been working on previously, plus recent innovations, would combine into a wonderful take, on the newAge that could be possible. (I wonder if there will come a Fork with multiple Ages to take, at some point)It is most certainly New, but it still draws from our Achievements in the Past, and will become even greater by Achievements of the Future.

“What will this something be that can change everything the way the computer did, or the combustion engine did, or the age of steam, or before the bronze age?”

We all have the Ability to do Great Things, and I believe in you, and I believe in me, so let us give it a try…

I still have to securely solidify how this Concept becomes Reality, but I know I have something that is worth giving a chance. That farseeing mind that envisions unique creations into existence, questions the content outside of the box, and seeks to find that which has never been found.

“It is imaginatively gifted people like you, Joshua, that have a sort of far-seeing mind. It is the far-seeing mind that can see things before anybody else sees them. And it is the far seeing mind that sees things before they even exist.”

Credit: Dean Beattie

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Deacidification of Dated Materials at Library and Archives Canada

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/21/2016 1477066572
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Funding for Deacidification project to restore dated materials at Library and Archives Canada (LARC: Deacidification project will require research str .... Read more

Funding for Deacidification project to restore dated materials at Library and Archives Canada (LARC: Deacidification project will require research strength and innovative of NRC to preserve national treasures kept at LARC. Once deacidification process is complete, materials should be made accessible publicly; this will require computer engineer to assist with virtual access.

Credit: Library of Congress

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Government role in essential non-proprietary research that is in the national public interest

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/19/2016 1476892252
Tags:
It is important to recognize and bolster the government role in essential non-proprietary research that is in the national public interest —this .... Read more

It is important to recognize and bolster the government role in essential non-proprietary research that is in the national public interest —this is particularly true in residential construction.

For the residential construction industry, collaborative research between industry and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), the National Research Council and Natural Resources Canada has had a significant positive impact on the quality of our housing and communities, and has enabled Canadians to consider themselves among the best housed nations in the world.

The full mandate of CMHC, including housing research and development, needs to be supported in order for the federal government to achieve its goals and fulfill its role in the provision of housing to Canadians. CMHC’s technical research and development supports industry innovation, identifying opportunities to increase productivity and reduce costs while at the same time making continued improvements in housing quality and choice.

NRCan (in the area of energy efficiency) and NRC (through Canada’s National Model Construction Codes development system and supporting the development of innovative technologies) also provide important support and research to the industry in their respective areas.

Cuts to these departments and agencies have dramatically reduced their research capacity in recent years, and a reinvestment is in need to support research to continue to improve Canada’s housing affordability through better-built houses that cost the same or less.

Credit: Canadian Home Builders' Association

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Gather anonymized genetic data from hospitals and labs to fuel AI based medical research

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/19/2016 1476880110
We have a world leading reputation for health care. We've spent a ton on the health infohighway to allow data to be shared. We're well placed for the .... Read more

We have a world leading reputation for health care. We've spent a ton on the health infohighway to allow data to be shared. We're well placed for the future: Artificial Intelligence based medical research. To get there, of course, we'll need to invest in AI and the PHDs that will develop it. But, they'll need data. MOUNTAINS of it. And they simply don't have it because Canadians aren't able to give it. 

Yet, they give bio samples all the time: Canada Blood Services, tests at the lab, etc...

So, why don't take these opportunities to take these samples and have them anonymized and analyzed and collected into a vast pool of genetic data--protected by the Governments of Canada--so our researchers can use to make us healthier?

Canadians are game.

They sign organ donor cards to help others in the after life; they'll surely agree to sign a permission to analyze material they're already giving to make themselves and others healthier. 

We say people are our greatest strength. That's truer than we think. 

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Canada will spend $800 million on a few lanes it can dominate globally. But the question of how they’ll pick the lucky sectors will be tricky politics

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/17/2016 1476728518
Tags:
“I really do think we need to pick some lanes, so to speak, to pick some focus areas, some sectors, some technology areas,”  &ld .... Read more

“I really do think we need to pick some lanes, so to speak, to pick some focus areas, some sectors, some technology areas,”

 “We can’t afford do it all. We have to pick some spots and specialize and really be excellent at them.”

http://ww2.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/2016/10/12/202934855

MACLEANS

October 12, 2016

 

Credit: Stephen Carlisle, GM Canada President

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Harvesting energy from hurricanes

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/14/2016 1476471849
A huge amount of clean, renewable energy goes untapped every year, and that's the energy pent up in hurricanes.  The technology to float platforms in .... Read more

A huge amount of clean, renewable energy goes untapped every year, and that's the energy pent up in hurricanes.  The technology to float platforms into hurricanes and to extract the wind energy from them already exists.  All that is needed is to bring all the related technologies together into a platform design so as to harvest this energy and then make it available for use on shore.  Here is a 20 minute YouTube video I have produced that explains this idea and how it would work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvcUu1e7aIU

This is a project that Canada could fund itself or lead in an international consortium to realize this innovation.

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More funding for Canada's Research Councils

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/13/2016 1476324607
Tags: accelerators  growth 
In order to achieve Global  science excellence, More funding for Canada's research councils is needed. With more funding, there will be more scholar .... Read more

In order to achieve Global  science excellence, More funding for Canada's research councils is needed. With more funding, there will be more scholarship and awards given, more research will be done and the economic growth will be higher.

Credit: Natural sciences and Engineering Research council of Canada's website.

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NCE networks: A model for bridging innovation gaps

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/11/2016 1476218424
Tags:
Any consideration of innovation and research in Canada must take into account the successful track record of the federally funded Networks of Centres .... Read more

Any consideration of innovation and research in Canada must take into account the successful track record of the federally funded Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCEs), a program specifically designed to overcome innovation gaps.

We strongly encourage those developing Canada's Innovation Agenda and undertaking the Science Review to consider the value of the NCE model to Canada.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/10/nau201610184418213.htm

NCE networks: A model for bridging innovation gapsAllerGen NCE Inc.

Credit: Paddy Moore, AllerGen NCE Inc.

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Proposal for the Canada Nation of Innovators Initiative Creation of a Global Science Excellence Matching Investment Fund (GSEMIF)

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/05/2016 1475684792
Tags:
see attached
Credit: Atlantic Cancer Research Institute

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Scientific Consulting Firms

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/04/2016 1475601567
I think there's an increasing need for consultants in the field of science and research in order to make use of the research findings. Consultants sh .... Read more

I think there's an increasing need for consultants in the field of science and research in order to make use of the research findings. Consultants should know about the policy, regulations, science, and business behind transforming research findings into useful knowledge. They should be well-equipped with the skill of knowledge translation because there are many research findings that cannot be translated into a product without help from other researchers. Canadian scientists and researchers produce a lot of papers about their research that is cited by researchers around the world, yet a small portion of those findings are actually used. 

There's an article on the Canadian Institute of Health Research that indicates that even though 4.1% of the world's research publications are produced in Canada, Canada only holds 1.7% of the world's patents. There needs to be a way for researchers to profit by collaborating with consulting firms and other researchers to transfer their research findings into meaningful contributions to society, even if those contributions aren't material-based. I would propose a collaborative effort to strengthen the field of science and research once scientists publish their findings.

Credit: Cardno ChemRisk, Canadian Institute of Health Research

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NCE networks: A model for bridging innovation gaps

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/04/2016 1475591153
Any consideration of innovation and research in Canada must take into account the successful track record of the federally funded Networks of Centres .... Read more

Any consideration of innovation and research in Canada must take into account the successful track record of the federally funded Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCEs), a program specifically designed to overcome innovation gaps.

This submission represents the collective voice of Canada’s NCE networks (12 current, 32 former) awarded by the Networks of Centres of Excellence program—all of which were created to fast-track the mobilization of research into tangible impacts that benefit Canadian society and its economic development.

We understand that any major review is wise to gather international perspectives and learn from elsewhere. We applaud this effort.

We make this submission to your review process to highlight that other countries have, in fact, looked to Canada and its NCE program as a model—one specifically designed to overcome innovation gaps.

NCE networks embody six elements that are critical to successful innovation. They provide evidence-based solutions to important problems by bringing the best minds into teams that develop and support innovative ideas. They build multidisciplinary networks needed to move an idea into real-world application, by connecting academia, communities, industry and governments. They train Canada’s future experts and leaders to connect across sectors. They transform Canada into a virtual, cutting-edge lab by networking access to state-of-the-art infrastructure and expertise. NCEs actively manage their investments to ensure project teams meet milestones and deliver socioeconomic benefits to Canadians.

Quick facts about NCE networks

  • Networks have helped train more than 45,000 highly qualified personnel (HQP) and create 147 spin-off companies.
  • Since 1989, the federal government has invested approximately $1.8 billion in NCE networks for research, commercialization and knowledge translation. Those investments have leveraged $1.2 billion in contributions from industry and other partners.
  • In 2014-15, there were 2,054 partners involved in the networks, including 567 from industry.

We know it works

For more than a quarter century, NCEs have had a record of success with landmark discoveries and high-impact achievements that include:

  • Inspiring countries around the world to follow the lead of the Canadian Stroke Strategy—which promotes and implements organized stroke care, resulting in countless lives saved and improved. (Canadian Stroke Network)
  • Creating what is now Canada’s largest internship program, Mitacs Accelerate, for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows of all disciplines—a program that started as a way to connect industry with advanced mathematical sciences graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. It continues as an important legacy of the initial NCE. (MITACS)
  • Changing the way bridges and dams are built around the world by merging civil engineering with electronics to create stronger structures and “smarter” structures that monitor their health in real time as they are subjected to the stresses of nature. (Intelligent Sensing for Innovative Structures)

 Current NCEs are following in this tradition:

  • A major breakthrough for treating early, aggressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) that uses stem cells and chemotherapy to eradicate MS in a small subset of patients, which is anticipated to become the new standard of care internationally. (Stem Cell Network)
  • A comprehensive suite of studies examining the impacts of climate change on regional ecosystems, societies and human populations is being modelled by the international Arctic Council for its Adaptation Action for a Changing Arctic assessment. (ArcticNet)
  • A Canadian-led study used deep genome sequencing to identify genetic underpinnings of autism that could enable diagnosis early enough to provide effective treatment. (NeuroDevNet)

These are but a few examples. There is much to be learned from the accomplishments of this innovative, multi-sectoral, multidisciplinary program. The groundbreaking NCE program is vital to Canada’s innovation landscape moving forward—a strong feature to build upon. We strongly encourage those developing Canada’s Innovation Agenda and undertaking the Science Review to consider the value of the NCE model to Canada.

For our full submission, please read the attached document.

Credit: Canada's 12 currently funded NCE networks

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It's smart to recycle...But we have to be Smarter at how we do it ?!!!

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/03/2016 1475534358
Tags:
Recycling day...time to get our p/u's out to the curb! And can you imagine that just where we place them on the curb can lower our carbon footprint so .... Read more

Recycling day...time to get our p/u's out to the curb! And can you imagine that just where we place them on the curb can lower our carbon footprint so dramatically it'll have positive global change within the first year ?!! At present we have(in the summer)3 huge trucks stopping in front of every house every week,right! Imagine instead of putting it in front of our homes we put them between our homes? Say we choose to put them at the middle home and instead of having 9 trucks stopping to pick up 3 homes stuff we have...3 trucks stopping,saving 6 truck stops !!! Stop and go traffic being the worst waste of fuel ??? But imagine if we hired one more man per truck and pick stuff up from both sides of our streets at the same time ? Pick up from 6 homes at one stop and save 12 truck stops !!! And only making one pass thru the millions of streets world wide...?$$$And we could start on everyone's next p/u day... and it's free ! Other than the hires?!! And the spin offs from less fuel being burnt,less mechanical wear and tear on both vehicles and manpower. And less man hours doing it !! Hey and here's another no brainer ! Today everyone is challenged to look outside the box for bigger and better ! But I want you to revisit the blue boxs,and all those cans and bottles filled with"air" !!? We compact our cardboard so we can get more on board the trucks rt ?!! Let's copy the practise ! And not only will it save numerous trips to recycling plant but will save millions of empty pop bottles blowing all over our streets,plugging our drains causing fewer floods. Crush every thing as flat as possible... and hey when your out there at the curb,fill one or two boxes up so the guys don't have to pick up 3 !!! Make sense ? Now every street or subdivision will have certain places that this won't work,but hey keep it simple folks... let's all "Get together on this" simple,virtually free contribution to controlling global warming and saving lots of money ! For that one point alone it's hard not to get it done !!! Yours in conservation,not destruction! Gary Cooper CD.  By just choosing a different place at the curb ?

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It's smart to recycle...But we have to be Smarter at how we do it ?!!!

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/03/2016 1475534306
Tags:
Recycling day...time to get our p/u's out to the curb! And can you imagine that just where we place them on the curb can lower our carbon footprint so .... Read more

Recycling day...time to get our p/u's out to the curb! And can you imagine that just where we place them on the curb can lower our carbon footprint so dramatically it'll have positive global change within the first year ?!! At present we have(in the summer)3 huge trucks stopping in front of every house every week,right! Imagine instead of putting it in front of our homes we put them between our homes? Say we choose to put them at the middle home and instead of having 9 trucks stopping to pick up 3 homes stuff we have...3 trucks stopping,saving 6 truck stops !!! Stop and go traffic being the worst waste of fuel ??? But imagine if we hired one more man per truck and pick stuff up from both sides of our streets at the same time ? Pick up from 6 homes at one stop and save 12 truck stops !!! And only making one pass thru the millions of streets world wide...?$$$And we could start on everyone's next p/u day... and it's free ! Other than the hires?!! And the spin offs from less fuel being burnt,less mechanical wear and tear on both vehicles and manpower. And less man hours doing it !! Hey and here's another no brainer ! Today everyone is challenged to look outside the box for bigger and better ! But I want you to revisit the blue boxs,and all those cans and bottles filled with"air" !!? We compact our cardboard so we can get more on board the trucks rt ?!! Let's copy the practise ! And not only will it save numerous trips to recycling plant but will save millions of empty pop bottles blowing all over our streets,plugging our drains causing fewer floods. Crush every thing as flat as possible... and hey when your out there at the curb,fill one or two boxes up so the guys don't have to pick up 3 !!! Make sense ? Now every street or subdivision will have certain places that this won't work,but hey keep it simple folks... let's all "Get together on this" simple,virtually free contribution to controlling global warming and saving lots of money ! For that one point alone it's hard not to get it done !!! Yours in conservation,not destruction! Gary Cooper CD.  By just choosing a different place at the curb ?

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Manipulate Science and Research Strengths to reduce hazards created by Solar Farms

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/03/2016 1475522050
Tags:
Manipulate Science and Research Strengths to reduce hazards created Solar Farms Solar energy has become popular among many developed country however .... Read more

Manipulate Science and Research Strengths to reduce hazards created Solar Farms

Solar energy has become popular among many developed country however the solar energy is not always green. The photovoltaic (PV) aka solar panel is actually made of electrochemicals; environmental impacts are sometimes inevitable. Make the best use of science and research growths to quickly decontaminate soil, water, and air when solar farms hit by storms. Set up protocol for emergency preparedness for industrial solar farms and residential solar settlement. Set up protocol for decontamination (natural disaster happens!) Regulate the recycling facilities for residential and industrial PVs.

Credit: First Solar

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Manipulate Science and Research Strengths to reduce hazards created by Wind Farms

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/03/2016 1475521934
Tags:
Manipulate Science and Research Strengths to reduce hazards created by Wind Farms As Canada is moving away from fossil fuel energy, wind farm infrast .... Read more

Manipulate Science and Research Strengths to reduce hazards created by Wind Farms

As Canada is moving away from fossil fuel energy, wind farm infrastructure is likely emerged across the country. It is not necessary that sustainable energy will cause zero hazards. Wind Farms may produce invisible electromagnetic fields, infrasound, ice throw and ice shed. I want to see the NRC scientists and researchers make the best use of their strengths to regulate or provide protocol to wind farm infrastructures that minimize unseen but potential hazards.

  • To minimize static and electromagnetic fields
  • To created Technology that reduces or eliminates ice throw and ice shed
  • To reduce noise and infrasound
Credit: NCCEH

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Enhanced collaboration between industry, academia and government research centres

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/01/2016 1475283909
Tags:
Improve the innovation ecosystem in Canada through enhancing the linkages between government research centres, universities and industry. There are .... Read more
  1. Improve the innovation ecosystem in Canada through enhancing the linkages between government research centres, universities and industry. There are a number of research support programs such as the NSERC CRD and Engage programs that are bi-lateral in nature (i.e. universities and industry).  Particularly in the Engineering disciplines, the uptake of R&D outcomes by industry would be enhanced via participation by government research centres, such as the NRC, CSA and CRC.  Government research centres offer advantages such as large scale test and experimental facilities, and a longer term research focus underpinned by experienced staff.
  2. Many large scale test and experimental facilities, including a number classified as “National Facilities,” at government research centres were built in the 1950’s and 60’s and are in dire need of revitalization, either through replacement or upgrades. For example some of these facilities were state-of-the art 30 or 40 years ago, and were thus used by Canadian industry to design and develop products of that era. However, the inability to support testing needed in the very competitive sectors, such as aerospace, has resulted in Canadian industry conducting many critical tests overseas.  In addition to increasing the development cost, and risk and risking loss of intellectual property, there has been a negative impact in the ability to maintain and grow critical knowledge and expertise within the Canadian innovation ecosystem.  A review of the capabilities of major national facilities at Government Research centres should be conducted to ensure that critical R&D needs are being met.  This should include research needs that are both of a fundamental and applied nature that is relevant to current and emerging Canadian industry requirements.
  3. Research and development is a key ingredient that feeds innovation. While applied R&D conducted at government centres is a valuable asset for supporting the development of innovative products by Canadian Industry that leads to growth in jobs and economic output, a robust level of fundamental R&D must also be conducted at these government research centres to ensure that the applied R&D needs of tomorrow can also be met.  At government research centres, the ever increasing focus on technical services and applied research needs to be rebalanced to ensure that the research needs of the future are not compromised.

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Enhanced collaboration between industry, academia and government research centres

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/01/2016 1475283704
Tags:
Improve the innovation ecosystem in Canada through enhancing the linkages between government research centres, universities and industry. There are .... Read more
  1. Improve the innovation ecosystem in Canada through enhancing the linkages between government research centres, universities and industry. There are a number of research support programs such as the NSERC CRD and Engage programs that are bi-lateral in nature (i.e. universities and industry).  Particularly in the Engineering disciplines, the uptake of R&D outcomes by industry would be enhanced via participation by government research centres, such as the NRC, CSA and CRC.  Government research centres offer advantages such as large scale test and experimental facilities, and a longer term research focus underpinned by experienced staff.
  2. Many large scale test and experimental facilities, including a number classified as “National Facilities,” at government research centres were built in the 1950’s and 60’s and are in dire need of revitalization, either through replacement or upgrades. For example some of these facilities were state-of-the art 30 or 40 years ago, and were thus used by Canadian industry to design and develop products of that era. However, the inability to support testing needed in the very competitive sectors, such as aerospace, has resulted in Canadian industry conducting many critical tests overseas.  In addition to increasing the development cost, and risk and risking loss of intellectual property, there has been a negative impact in the ability to maintain and grow critical knowledge and expertise within the Canadian innovation ecosystem.  A review of the capabilities of major national facilities at Government Research centres should be conducted to ensure that critical R&D needs are being met.  This should include research needs that are both of a fundamental and applied nature that is relevant to current and emerging Canadian industry requirements.
  3. Research and development is a key ingredient that feeds innovation. While applied R&D conducted at government centres is a valuable asset for supporting the development of innovative products by Canadian Industry that leads to growth in jobs and economic output, a robust level of fundamental R&D must also be conducted at these government research centres to ensure that the applied R&D needs of tomorrow can also be met.  At government research centres, the ever increasing focus on technical services and applied research needs to be rebalanced to ensure that the research needs of the future are not compromised.

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Enhanced collaboration between industry, academia and government research centres

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/01/2016 1475283576
Tags:
Improve the innovation ecosystem in Canada through enhancing the linkages between government research centres, universities and industry. There are .... Read more
  1. Improve the innovation ecosystem in Canada through enhancing the linkages between government research centres, universities and industry. There are a number of research support programs such as the NSERC CRD and Engage programs that are bi-lateral in nature (i.e. universities and industry).  Particularly in the Engineering disciplines, the uptake of R&D outcomes by industry would be enhanced via participation by government research centres, such as the NRC, CSA and CRC.  Government research centres offer advantages such as large scale test and experimental facilities, and a longer term research focus underpinned by experienced staff.
  2. Many large scale test and experimental facilities, including a number classified as “National Facilities,” at government research centres were built in the 1950’s and 60’s and are in dire need of revitalization, either through replacement or upgrades. For example some of these facilities were state-of-the art 30 or 40 years ago, and were thus used by Canadian industry to design and develop products of that era. However, the inability to support testing needed in the very competitive sectors, such as aerospace, has resulted in Canadian industry conducting many critical tests overseas.  In addition to increasing the development cost, and risk and risking loss of intellectual property, there has been a negative impact in the ability to maintain and grow critical knowledge and expertise within the Canadian innovation ecosystem.  A review of the capabilities of major national facilities at Government Research centres should be conducted to ensure that critical R&D needs are being met.  This should include research needs that are both of a fundamental and applied nature that is relevant to current and emerging Canadian industry requirements.
  3. Research and development is a key ingredient that feeds innovation. While applied R&D conducted at government centres is a valuable asset for supporting the development of innovative products by Canadian Industry that leads to growth in jobs and economic output, a robust level of fundamental R&D must also be conducted at these government research centres to ensure that the applied R&D needs of tomorrow can also be met.  At government research centres, the ever increasing focus on technical services and applied research needs to be rebalanced to ensure that the research needs of the future are not compromised.

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Build Capacity and Skills in Fusion Energy Development

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 09/30/2016 1475272114
Members of the Canadian fusion community representing universities, industry and research support organizations from five provinces are proposing a re .... Read more

Members of the Canadian fusion community representing universities, industry and research support organizations from five provinces are proposing a revitalized Canadian fusion program with the vision that: by 2030, Canada will support the deployment of a demonstration fusion power plant.  Our plan, named “Fusion 2030: A Roadmap for Canada,” is attached.

 

Climate change, clean technology and innovation are now identified in provincial and federal agendas as major issues facing Canada’s (and the world’s) future. There are three central questions: 1) How do we satisfy the large future energy requirements of the developed and especially developing countries? 2) How do we do this in a sustainable, environmentally acceptable way? And 3) How do we ensure suitable economic opportunity for our children, grandchildren and future generations in an energy dependent society?  Associated with this is where does Canada want to position itself in a new global energy future?

 

Nuclear fusion is the energy process that powers the sun. Fusion energy is expected to be safe, reliable, clean and sustainable. It has the highest energy density, the best energy payback ratio and lowest carbon footprint of any source. It is an excellent solution to the problems of global climate change and long-term energy security. In addition, fusion energy research pushes the bounds of fundamental and applied research in areas ranging from plasma physics, to materials science, to high-performance computing, to power engineering, to name just a few areas.

 

Development of a fusion energy solution is a nation-sized challenge that requires coordinated national research leadership. Recent advances by international research consortia, universities and private industry are showing that practical fusion energy production is getting closer and will likely be achieved in the next 20 years. Unlike many countries, there is no national strategy for fusion energy research in Canada, although one did exist between 1985 and 1997. 

 

Today, there are pockets of small-scale fusion-related research occurring across the country at universities and a number of private sector start-up companies. While these groups are contributing to fusion research, Canada needs to grow its involvement if it is to see the innovation and benefits that will come from the development of commercial fusion energy.

 

The Fusion 2030 roadmap lays out a strategy the goal to position Canada to be a world player in fusion research in 5 years and a leader in 10. It calls for a revitalized national Canadian fusion program, in concert with provincial initiatives, to prepare Canada for the coming fusion era. Preparedness and participation are the key attributes of the strategy.

 

Sustainable, clean base-load energy to replace carbon fuels is the paramount issue of this century and fusion is a major part of the solution. Fusion energy research also has the potential to enhance research, innovation and industrial development. Canada needs to be involved.

 

The Fusion 2030 Working Group

Credit: Fusion 2030 Working Group (University of Alberta, University of Saskatchewan, General Fusion, Sylvia

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How can Canada contribute to new models to stimulate biomedical R&D for innovations of global public health importance while simultaneously ensuring affordability of end products and access for all in need?

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 09/30/2016 1475268948
Tags:
ABSTRACT Over the past two decades there has been growing recognition that the current global system for biomedical innovation fails to deliver adapte .... Read more

ABSTRACT

Over the past two decades there has been growing recognition that the current global system for biomedical innovation fails to deliver adapted and affordable health technologies. The lack of innovation of and access to health tools that address public health needs is well-documented. This crisis was initially understood to affect ‘diseases of poverty’ in developing countries but today, despite important progress, the dominant model for financing and incentivizing R&D, which relies primarily on the intellectual property system, is increasingly problematic for all countries – regardless of disease area or income classification.

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), an independent, international research and development (R&D) organization, was created in 2003 as an experiment in ‘innovation for access’ by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and five public research institutions from India, Brazil, Kenya, Malaysia, France, and the World Health Organization Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Disease Research (WHO/TDR), in response to the frustration of being faced with medicines that were ineffective, highly toxic, unavailable, or had never been developed.

This contribution provides concrete evidence of DNDi’s experience implementing needs-driven, open, collaborative R&D, which has resulted in the development of seven adapted, affordable, and non-patented treatments and the most robust pipeline ever for some of the world’s most neglected diseases. DNDi’s model is a practical illustration of how R&D can be conducted in the public interest, if a de-linked approach is implemented, with R&D costs at a fraction of the traditional pharmaceutical business model.

It draws lessons that may be applicable to other disease areas and product types, to help inform the Canadian government’s review of its innovation and science policies.

Finally, it recommends a series of progressive policy steps Canada can support to re-orient the global biomedical R&D system so that it (1) prioritizes patient and public health needs; (2) is sustainably financed; and (3) incorporates global norms that will enable the discovery, development, and delivery of and equitable access to innovations of public health importance.

 

Credit: Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative, Dr. James Orbinski, Rachel M. Cohen

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How can Canada contribute to new models to stimulate biomedical R&D for innovations of global public health importance while simultaneously ensuring affordability of end products and access for all in need?

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 09/30/2016 1475268946
Tags:
ABSTRACT Over the past two decades there has been growing recognition that the current global system for biomedical innovation fails to deliver adapte .... Read more

ABSTRACT

Over the past two decades there has been growing recognition that the current global system for biomedical innovation fails to deliver adapted and affordable health technologies. The lack of innovation of and access to health tools that address public health needs is well-documented. This crisis was initially understood to affect ‘diseases of poverty’ in developing countries but today, despite important progress, the dominant model for financing and incentivizing R&D, which relies primarily on the intellectual property system, is increasingly problematic for all countries – regardless of disease area or income classification.

The Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), an independent, international research and development (R&D) organization, was created in 2003 as an experiment in ‘innovation for access’ by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and five public research institutions from India, Brazil, Kenya, Malaysia, France, and the World Health Organization Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Disease Research (WHO/TDR), in response to the frustration of being faced with medicines that were ineffective, highly toxic, unavailable, or had never been developed.

This contribution provides concrete evidence of DNDi’s experience implementing needs-driven, open, collaborative R&D, which has resulted in the development of seven adapted, affordable, and non-patented treatments and the most robust pipeline ever for some of the world’s most neglected diseases. DNDi’s model is a practical illustration of how R&D can be conducted in the public interest, if a de-linked approach is implemented, with R&D costs at a fraction of the traditional pharmaceutical business model.

It draws lessons that may be applicable to other disease areas and product types, to help inform the Canadian government’s review of its innovation and science policies.

Finally, it recommends a series of progressive policy steps Canada can support to re-orient the global biomedical R&D system so that it (1) prioritizes patient and public health needs; (2) is sustainably financed; and (3) incorporates global norms that will enable the discovery, development, and delivery of and equitable access to innovations of public health importance.

 

Credit: Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative, Dr. James Orbinski, Rachel M. Cohen

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Investing in Advanced Research Computing Is Essential to Remain Competitive

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 09/30/2016 1475247207
 Supercomputing and big data infrastructure are essential infrastructure for innovation in Canada and support important economic drivers.Larger syste .... Read more

 Supercomputing and big data infrastructure are essential infrastructure for innovation in Canada and support important economic drivers.Larger systems are very costly and sharing resources allows for investment in leadership class systems that will compete globally. This is a growing global trend. We have the opportunity to lead. Leveraging ARC expertise to support a broader community will accelerate skills develop in government and economic development. Fee for service or infrastructure as a service enables efficient cost recovery and solves current funding model issues.

Credit: Compute Canada

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Adopt a broad definition of innovation.

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 09/28/2016 1475077679
Tags: innovation 
Innovation is crucial for solving problems and creating economic and social value across all industries and sectors. While high tech might be the most .... Read more

Innovation is crucial for solving problems and creating economic and social value across all industries and sectors. While high tech might be the most visible innovation space, any new innovation policy will be bolstered by the government taking a broad view of innovation.

Credit: Memorial University of Newfoundland

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Creation of a structure for consulting the research community

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 09/27/2016 1475002143
Tags:
The AFMC supports establishment of a Council or Academy of advisors drawn from a range of research disciplines which include health, engineering, soci .... Read more

The AFMC supports establishment of a Council or Academy of advisors drawn from a range of research disciplines which include health, engineering, social, technological and environmental sciences. There are a number of models for the development of such an “Advisory Council” including the European Commission’s recent establishment of a Scientific Advice Mechanism (SAM).  Such a Council or Academy could be chaired by the Chief Scientific Officer for Canada to provide the Government with the highest caliber of independent and authoritative advice on matters related to science. This Council also could serve as “think tank” for deliberating a balance of investments in “Big Science” and traditional streams of investigator(s)-driven research, assess the value of global collaborations to Canada and ensure that social domains of health research continue to be represented in science policy.

Recommendation:

Creation an independent Scientific Advice Mechanism to ensure alignment of scientific thinking and strategy with both capabilities and societal needs.

Credit: The Association of Faculties of Medicine

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Strategic coordination and integration of programs

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 09/27/2016 1475002038
Tags: funding  health 
Better coordination is needed between current portals of federal funding which include the tri-councils CIHR, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Res .... Read more

Better coordination is needed between current portals of federal funding which include the tri-councils CIHR, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Social Sciences Health Research Council (SSHRC)), the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI), The Canada Research Chairs (CRC) program, the Canada Excellence Research Chairs (CERC) programs, Genome Canada and the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF). The entire research enterprise would benefit substantially from harmonized policies, requirements and procedures to lighten the ever-increasing burden on researchers and institutions.

Recommendation:

The AFMC recommends the establishment of an inter-agency oversight body, which permits dialogue between the funding agencies, and allows appropriate co-ordination of both infrastructure and ongoing research funding in the most effective way. These measures would also promote harmonization of pre-and post-award management of research funding.

The mandate of such an inter-agency oversight body would also include developing policy that addresses scientific and research integrity and ensuring the principles of diversity are respected and adhered to.

Credit: The Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada

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Research Strategies and Priorities

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 09/27/2016 1475001876
Tags: funding  health 
Funding Model: Increased research investment is required to strike an appropriate balance between fundamental research to generate new discoveries a .... Read more

Funding Model:

Increased research investment is required to strike an appropriate balance between fundamental research to generate new discoveries and the application of such discoveries to advance the health and economic well-being of Canadians. The Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada (AFMC) believes basic and translational science ultimately drives patient-oriented research and as such these domains should be viewed as being complementary to advancing the health of our populations. Examples of such research include sequencing SARS and vaccine for Ebola viruses, development of stem cell-based therapies, and advancing cancer oncogenomics, where initiatives in basic sciences have driven the capability to implement the betterment of human health. In this respect, it is critical that health services are equipped with a preparedness to respond to significant advances in knowledge and newer technologies - such preparedness may require significant funding.

The AFMC is strongly supportive of research that has a “big tent” approach to yield translational output and recognize that inclusive inter-disciplinary research frequently results in more rapid and effective translation of knowledge and innovation. As an organization committed to promoting research as a key driver of the knowledge economy, we believe that funding targeted at innovation is crucial to the delivery of this mission.

Recommendation:

The AFMC recommends the creation of distinct yet complementary emphasis on the research mandates for the entire continuum of health research from that related to delivery of health care. This would include creation of a new Health Research Innovation Fund (perhaps through a Federal-Provincial partnership) as suggested by the Report of the Advisory Panel on Healthcare Innovation in July 2015. A new fund would provide the flexibility to provide a nimble and timely response to emerging and important health research issues such as recent global pandemic crises where Canada has a demonstrated record of outstanding accomplishments. This fund could be also used to invest in emerging transformative, or potential disruptive technologies that stand to advance the health care and economic benefits to Canadians. We support participation and leadership of researchers in decision making related to important funding issues.

Credit: The Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada

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