Global science excellence

Connect college expertise to innovative SMEs

Question:How can colleges play a larger role in the innovation ecosystem?
on 12/02/2016 1480713535
INTRODUCTION The Ultra-Deep Mining Network (UDMN) is a network that is made up of small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs), mining companies, universities .... Read more

INTRODUCTION

The Ultra-Deep Mining Network (UDMN) is a network that is made up of small-to-medium enterprises (SMEs), mining companies, universities, and colleges.  Colleges like George Brown, Cambrian College, Northern College, and Niagara College have played a key role in advancing mining innovation projects with commercial viability and adoption  The colleges are invaluable collaborative partners to mining industry innovators because they provide hands-on experience and applied approach facilitates that accelerate mining demonstration projects.

CHALLENGES

As an industry, mining requires a combination of highly qualified people (HQP)s from Universities in technical (engineering, geology (STEM)) and business roles, but according to Mining Industry Human Resources Council’s 2016 National Report, mining will also be facing a shortfall of skilled trades (college graduates) in the next decade.  Without access to industry engagement (coops/placements, field trips, mine tours), students miss out on the real-world experience necessary to find meaningful jobs, and the industry loses out of the high-quality work colleges can offer.

SOLUTIONS

Through investment into modern technology such as additive manufacturing tools, colleges can represent a unique and invaluable resource for Canadian SMEs.  Industry networks such as UDMN can and are helping by connecting SME innovators to colleges.  This leads to technical development and prototyping that accelerates SME commercialization as well as student learning in real-world circumstances. This also leads to new hires of students by SMEs and a culture of company loyalty and growth.

*Note:  For information about the Ultra-Deep Mining Network, please visit: https://www.miningdeep.ca/

Credit: Ultra-Deep Mining Network

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Sustaining Life in a Harsh Environment: A Canadian Project for Mars Habitats, Northern Communities, and Food Security in the Face of Ongoing Climate Change

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 12/01/2016 1480626676
To indefinitely provide a secure, healthy food source in a resource-limited environment is the single largest scientific and technological challen .... Read more

To indefinitely provide a secure, healthy food source in a resource-limited environment is the single largest scientific and technological challenge preventing the establishment of independent human colonies elsewhere in the solar system. The need to rely on intermittent resupply of nutrients is a critical survival risk for remote settlements not only in space, but also in Canada's North.  As a world leader in controlled environment agriculture, Canada has the capability to address this multidisciplinary challenge in an incremental program that will yield immediate benefits to our agricultural industry and to the food security of remote Northern settlements. 

The innovative technologies needed for resource-efficient agriculture will not only enable future semi-permanent extraterrestrial habitats, but will also help the terrestrial greenhouse industry to deal with the effects of climate change, and the increasing costs of energy and labour, by reducing water usage, increasing nutrient recycling, and developing automated horticultural systems.

Recommendation:  A scalable prototype operational Mars food production system could be built with current technology in a Northern distribution centre for $2-10 Million to serve as a testbed for space technologies while also addressing food security, nutrition and health issues across Canada's north. By reducing the amount of food imported and reinvesting this money in northern jobs and infrastructure, this program has undeniable and immediate socio-economic benefits to Canada.

For more information on the market and feasibility assessment: http://nwtresearch.com/projects/archived-projects/agnorth

Credit: University of Guelph Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility; Aurora Research Institute

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Turbo Charge Emerging Growth in Printable, Flexible and Wearable Electronics

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 12/01/2016 1480608539
Printable, flexible and wearable electronics (PE) is an emerging market already worth tens of billions worldwide. PE lies at the convergence of severa .... Read more

Printable, flexible and wearable electronics (PE) is an emerging market already worth tens of billions worldwide. PE lies at the convergence of several industries in which Canada has a strong track record – advanced materials, micro-electronics, information and communications technologies, printing and advanced manufacturing.

The Canadian industry sector has the expertise, innovation and opportunity to revolutionize the electronics industry, for substantial socio-economic benefits across Canada and abroad. More than 250 domestic organizations that we know of are active in the space. The majority of these are startups and young SMEs, but we also have strong Canadian & global companies located in Canada adding such capabilities.

In the attached doc, we discuss how the government framework for supporting such an emerging technology sector must adapt and adjust to provide the boost a young industry needs to achieve its global growth potential and generate wealth and jobs for Canada's knowledge-based economy.

Credit: XRCC, Cooledge Lighting, Memtronik Innovations, NRC, ICI, INO

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Ma participation a l’édifice Canada

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 11/29/2016 1480458339
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A mon avis, il ne peut y avoir d'excellence scientifique à l'échelle mondiale à long terme sans une franche révolution spirituelle. Cela signifier .... Read more

A mon avis, il ne peut y avoir d'excellence scientifique à l'échelle mondiale à long terme sans une franche révolution spirituelle. Cela signifierait en quelque sorte mettre la charrue avant les bœufs. Je ne parle pas des religions de routine ni de la théologie dépassée qu'on enseigne dans les universités d'ici, car ces choses ne sont que des recherches superficielles de Dieu, qui n'avancent pas la société; mais de la christologie, qui est une voie par excellence pour atteindre tout objectif. 

En regardant de près l'évolution de la société Canadienne, je remarque qu'il y a comme un déni de Christ dans les mentalités. Alors qu'il est clairement établi que toute la science de Dieu commence par son Christ et finit en lui, et sans lui l'homme ne peut de lui-même faire quelque chose qui puisse émerveiller.

Prenons l'exemple de deux grandes nations fortement industrialisées de ce monde (USA et le Chine), qui pratiquent l'un la spiritualité de la droite de Dieu et l'autre la spiritualité de sa gauche, nous constatons qu'ils sont respectivement première et deuxième économie. Le Canada, pour se hisser au premier rang mondial, le gouvernement Canadien doit a son tour se lancer en outsider à la course derrière eux, et en appliquer véritablement le coté droit de la dualité Divine.

Je suggère au gouvernement Canadien de mettre au programme de toutes ses universités pour tous les étudiants confondus, l'étude approfondie de la christologie pour l'ouverture d'esprit de tous ses intellectuels et chercheurs. Ainsi, ils pourront parvenir jusqu'au monde de la perfection invisible de Dieu et réaliser dans le concret les grandes ambitions du Canada.    

Credit: Jean-Marie Ayissi, Chercheur libre en christologie et Consultant spirituel, site: www.lamparo.org

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Colleges, institutes & applied research

Question:How can colleges play a larger role in the innovation ecosystem?
on 11/04/2016 1478278431
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College and institutes applied research involves the practical application of knowledge, expertise, methods and techniques to real-world problems. It .... Read more

College and institutes applied research involves the practical application of knowledge, expertise, methods and techniques to real-world problems. It enables innovation by responding to immediate needs and short-term opportunities identified by industry, small-business owners and entrepreneurs.

 

Lakeland College’s recently opened Livestock Research Facility gives students the tools they need to address tomorrow’s issues. Through the facility, students have conducted livestock research projects in areas such as lamb milk replacer, heifer feed efficiency and wet/dry barley feed trials. Similarly, the Construction Research Centre at Algonquin College allows students to conduct research to improve decision making in building design. Student projects quantitatively compare different techniques and materials for construction as well as attempt to improve process efficiency.

 

Supporting colleges and institutes in the construction of campus-based applied research facilities, as well as Technology Access Centres (TACs) will allow these institutions to continue working to address the needs of industry and society as a whole.

 

Read more in CICan’s full submission to the Innovation Agenda here: http://bit.ly/2ebHwvv

Credit: Colleges and Institutes Canada

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Building on college/institutes capacity for innovation

Question:How can colleges play a larger role in the innovation ecosystem?
on 11/04/2016 1478278392
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Essential skills – literacy, numeracy and digital skills – are the foundation for innovation skills, and are critical to helping people ev .... Read more

Essential skills – literacy, numeracy and digital skills – are the foundation for innovation skills, and are critical to helping people evolve with their jobs and adapt to workplace change. Colleges and institutes in corporate these essential life skills in to all programs and provide academic upgrading to non-traditional learners who need help in accessing good-middle-class jobs. Investing in essential skills training partnerships between colleges/institutes and employers will capitalize on college and institute strengths in developing Canada’s innovation ecosystem.

 

The role that colleges and institutes play has evolved dynamically over the past half century in response to the needs of the people they serve and the opportunities presented within their communities. Colleges and institutes now occupy a central place in Canada’s post-secondary education system and are major contributors to the economic development of their regions, working actively with partners in all sectors. There are tremendous opportunities for Canada to improve its innovation performance in all six of the action areas identified in the government’s Innovation Agenda by capitalizing on the capacity and capabilities of colleges and institutes. Specifically:

 

  1. To foster an Entrepreneurial and Creative Society and Compete in a Digital World:

Invest in people to develop and maintain an innovation-ready workforce equipped with the skills and experience to meet the rapidly evolving needs of the labour market, generate and implement new ideas and technologies, grow companies, and adapt readily to the changing global market.

 

  1. To expand and exploit Global Science Excellence, support World Leading Clusters and Partnerships and increase the Ease of Doing Business:

Unlock local innovation by providing regional partners, particularly SMEs, with more and easier access to applied research capacity to develop, adapt, and market their products and services in new ways and to maximize their contributions to value chains and the development of world-leading clusters.

 

  1. To Grow Companies and Accelerate Clean Growth

Support the creation and growth of SMEs, including those in clean-tech, by providing student and community entrepreneurs with the training, advice, services and connections required to start and scale new companies that can move into global markets.

 

Read more in CICan’s full submission to the Innovation Agenda here: http://bit.ly/2ebHwvv

Credit: Colleges and Institutes Canada

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Six strategies for Canadian universities to foster innovation

Question:How can colleges play a larger role in the innovation ecosystem?
on 11/04/2016 1478275197
Tags:
The buzzword “innovation” might perk you up – or make your eyes roll. Regardless of how the term sits with you, innovation is clearl .... Read more

The buzzword “innovation” might perk you up – or make your eyes roll. Regardless of how the term sits with you, innovation is clearly on the federal government’s agenda and of big interest to universities as they try to keep pace with rapid changes in society and the economy, while staying responsive to government funding priorities and continuing to meet the needs of their students, faculty and the wider community.

 

With the federal government grappling with weak economic growth and working on crafting a new “innovation agenda,” (PDF) we asked six experts inside and outside the academy what role they think universities should play in fostering greater innovation in Canada. Their innovation definitions differ in their wording, but are variations on the theme that innovation is not about inventions, per se, but about the novel use of inventions and technologies that lead to transformative new or improved services, products and processes. Universities already make substantial contributions through their teaching, learning and research functions, and have at least some role to play in the innovation ecosystem, they agree, but how far that should go and in which ways yielded intriguing ideas from each of them.

 

The two-stream solution

 

Innovation comes from two streams. One is a really novel idea somebody has. The other is through the deep, committed research that happens in laboratories over many years. Universities foster both. We are incubators of ventures and of entrepreneurs, and are a key part of the innovation ecosystem.

We can support innovation by being willing to work with industry as partners and having our researchers work closely to solve key industry issues, rather than looking for places where university discoveries can be plugged in.

 

We should foster a culture of risk-taking. Universities are traditionally oriented towards success, but experience tells us most ventures fail. Unless people take chances, innovation won’t happen. Our social innovation lab RADIUS (RADical Ideas, Useful to Society) holds a “Social Venture Failure Wake” to celebrate the many failures that come with trying new things and learning from them. That’s another area universities can embrace: social innovation, which is about new ideas that produce value for the world, even if they don’t generate profits.

 

Producers of new knowledge

 

Universities have a role to play in fostering innovation but they cannot be the engine of innovation. They can and should be the producers of new knowledge; that should be their main goal.

 

Universities can be places where a lot of research that might eventually become innovation happens. But, they are not the research lab of big corporations. They can be places where companies might start but then equally important is acting as partners in innovation with already established firms. They can provide collaborative public space for innovation.

 

Universities educate the people who technically innovate as well as the people who can conceptualize innovation.

 

Universities should be allowed to use their research capabilities to address tricky policy questions such as intellectual property rights, incubation and all the rest. They should be judged much more in terms of their very broad impact on innovation, not by the number of patents they have or the money they earn in licensing fees. I’d like to see more research projects that look at that.

 

From start-ups to scaling up

 

The end goal of our innovation policy should be the creation of globally competitive, Canadian technology companies that compete on the basis of innovation.

 

When you talk to universities about what they are doing to foster innovation, generally you hear a lot about innovation research and development, academic research, the commercialization of research, nurturing entrepreneurship and the start-up culture. We need to take it further.

 

Start-ups can’t be the end game. They really don’t create jobs; they churn jobs. Our business school feels our focus needs to be on the challenges companies face as they scale up, grow and try to become globally competitive. These are management issues, not technology issues.

 

Innovation policy is not just about the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) disciplines. Business schools have to be seen as an important part of the mix. Along with that, universities need to pay attention to the complementarity between their science and engineering programs and their business programs. The crosswalks aren’t always well-established, but they are important. Universities are still the prime source of research and development in this country and there is some really interesting stuff coming out of universities. Having built the science infrastructure, we now have to complement that with business experience and acumen if we’re really going to grow these companies here, in Canada, to provide employment opportunities and create wealth.

 

A focus on graduate skills

 

Canada’s innovation agenda shouldn’t put universities at the centre. Moreover, we should be careful not to blow up the university system trying to do something it wasn’t designed to do. Governments need to think less about what kinds of inputs can spur innovation at universities and more about the mechanisms through which great university research and research skills can be better integrated into the innovation ecosystem.

 

That said, universities could shift the culture of graduate education to one that recognizes that the real purpose of a PhD is to educate researchers, deep thinkers and creative problem-solvers, and that most will go on to careers outside the academy. Beyond workshops to provide graduate students with career and professional skills, there are models, such as the innovation partnership organization Mitacs, which give graduate students the chance to apply their research skills to problems in the private and social sectors.

 

Canada lags in innovation management skills. Universities could explore ways to offer education to students across disciplines, through additional courses, co-ops, internships and other experiential learning to develop these skills. It’s important for students to first get a grounding in a discipline before acquiring management skills.

 

Much successful innovation will draw on technical skills and scientific knowledge, as well as on understandings of human psychology, behaviour and design. Students comfortable with both science and the social sciences and humanities will likely contribute more to addressing future innovation challenges and opportunities, so working harder to ensure cross-disciplinary learning for students would be helpful.

 

It’s not about the patents

 

I don’t accept that universities should have a major role in promoting Canadian innovation, although they have an indirect role. They’re the conservators, the transmitters and the creators of some of the foundational and critical knowledge that drives the socio-economic system. But they’re constitutionally designed not to be in the commercial space, because universities are all about excellence, which slows things down – commercialization is all about bootstrapping.

 

Most universities don’t cover the costs of their tech transfer or industry liaison offices through the cash returns on intellectual property. You need a big intellectual property portfolio to have a good chance of succeeding and most Canadian universities are too small. In the bio-science space, only about four universities in North America, out of about 650, are large enough to cover their expenses. Of the groups that are high-impact, many aren’t part of the formal academy; they’re in their own research enclaves.

 

Eroding the Ivory Tower

 

Universities are central to the innovation ecosystem. While fundamental and discovery-based research is critical to pushing the envelope, excellence and relevance are not mutually exclusive. Researchers should be encouraged to work with partners to solve real-world problems and the reward system must reflect this. Instead of hoping that research will move from lab to marketplace, we need systems that actively prospect for commercialization opportunities. This requires a coherent strategy from government, granting agencies and universities as well as a change in the structures that will respond to it. Universities need better platforms for exchanging information about who has ideas, who has needs and who has capacity to commercialize and drive change.

While innovation discussions tend to focus on STEM, which are fundamental, they miss the important role our social sciences and humanities departments could play in understanding the factors that drive or impede the adoption of new technologies and processes. That’s a huge blind spot. Innovation requires that we do things differently. The adoption of technologies is shaped by human behaviour, organizational issues, public policy, law and the content they transmit – all within the social sciences and humanities domain.

Six strategies for Canadian universities to foster innovation

University Affairs

November 2, 2016

http://ww2.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/en/2016/11/2/203203596

Credit: Moira Macdonald – Writer, University Affairs

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Encouraging innovation wherever it occurs

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 11/04/2016 1478267305
Tags:
Colleges and institutes in Canada are home to 763 specialized research centres providing innovative research and products for local business partners. .... Read more

Colleges and institutes in Canada are home to 763 specialized research centres providing innovative research and products for local business partners. We can amplify the impact of college and institute applied research by investing in and creating new Innovation Services Hubs at colleges and institutes across the country. These hubs will capitalize upon both college and institute relationships with business and community partners and the strength of college and institute research to provide cluster partners, local incubators and accelerators with a single point of entry to the resources and facilities available on campus and offer direct support to student and community entrepreneurs.

 

Canada must enable and encourage innovation wherever it occurs – in all sectors, at all scales, in all regions, and in each and every community where Canadians aspire to find the good-paying jobs that will help grow the middle class. Within existing and emerging clusters, it is crucial that the strengths and contributions of all players and assets be identified, expanded and used to their fullest potential. Clusters in areas such as advanced manufacturing, nanotechnology, construction technology, agriculture, environmental technology / biotechnology, food technology, and healthcare technology are currently supported by 30 Technology Access Centres (TACs) located at 27 colleges and institutes.

 

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are also a significant source of untapped innovation potential. They represent 99.7% of all Canadian firms, employ 90.3% of the private sector workforce and yet account for just 27% of total R&D expenditures. SME owners are natural innovators and many of their businesses are ready to scale up operations within Canada, work with larger firms within supply chains, and expand exports to international markets. SMEs are willing to invest in the digital technology and R&D required to generate growth and contribute to global value chains, but first and foremost, they have to focus on keeping their firms profitable and minimizing overhead. Accessing federal support for R&D can be daunting and building in-house capacity – both in terms of equipment and expertise – is rarely feasible.

 

Innovation beyond the private sector represents another important area of opportunity. The public and not-for-profit sectors can generate significant economic and social benefits in the form of tax-payer savings and improved health and social outcomes. Healthcare is an area that offers great innovation potential, with health expenditures consuming over 10% of GDP10 and pressures increasing due to an aging population. There is an urgent need to invest in research that re-thinks healthcare delivery, embeds digital technology and disseminates new techniques, processes and services.

 

“As the population ages, there will be a greater premium on seamless delivery of multi-disciplinary care across diverse settings, not least the patient’s place of residence.”

- Naylor Report (Unleashing Innovation: Excellent Healthcare for Canada), 2015

 

Currently, funding limitations and the complex array of programs offered by multiple funders are inhibiting the growth potential of the applied research enterprise in Canada’s colleges and institutes and stifling partners’ investments in innovation. In its pre-budget submission to the Standing Committee on Finance, Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan) called for a significant increase in the applied research funding envelope available to colleges, from $75M a year to $300M ramped up over five years, and the creation of new programs that are more responsive to the innovation opportunities presented by research partners and recognize the proven capacity of college applied research.

 

Read more in CICan’s full submission to the Innovation Agenda here: http://bit.ly/2ebHwvv

Credit: Colleges and Institutes Canada

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Maximizing Talent and Knowledge

Question:How can we increase demand for science, technology, engineering and math graduates?
on 10/31/2016 1477933719
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Increased Target Funding for Research and Development Engineers Canada is supportive of government investment in research, development and innovation .... Read more

Increased Target Funding for Research and Development

Engineers Canada is supportive of government investment in research, development and innovation in Canada, and strongly supports the cooperation between the engineering profession and the federal government. Federal government support for research, development and innovation helps to ensure adequate funds are available to support the procurement and retention of talent and to reinforce the position of Canada as a good place to invest, as well as to develop our domestic intellectual property.

Currently, Canada is seen to be lagging behind other developed nations within the international community in terms of research, development, and innovation investments. The Science, Technology and Innovation Council (2015) delineates that “poor business innovation performance is Canada’s most ‘profound and urgent’ science, technology and innovation challenge.”[i] Investing in research and development projects and activities allows businesses and post-secondary institutions to develop new designs and products that improve efficiency, promote environmental stewardship and enhance economic diversity. By providing support, the federal government can help Canadian innovators create products and businesses that promote economic growth and job creation.

The federal government should support the increased target funding for research and development investments within post-secondary institutions, businesses and professions. Increased federal funding should be focused within science, technological, engineering, and mathematics research fields, specifically directed at health, natural and social sciences, innovation investments, and infrastructure projects. The federal government should continue to explore ways in which Canada can improve its competitiveness, output and quality of life for all Canadians.

A clear plan is required to support research and development investments across Canada that works in partnership with non-profit organizations, universities and the private sector. The federal government has a role to play in identifying and directing funding and investment to potentially high value activities and sectors that are known to be areas of strength for Canada in the global market.

Remove Barriers to Commercialization and Technology Transfers within Program Requirements

In 2011, Engineers Canada released a report entitled “Putting the Pieces Together: A Response to the Review of Federal Support to Research and Development.” In this report, Engineers Canada recommended that the federal government work to ensure that the requirements to qualify for grants and incentives do not include elements or barriers that may be stifling commercialization, specifically for various Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council programs.

The difficulties faced in securing intellectual property ownership of engineering-related research, design and development can limit the commercialization of joint academic and business research and development. Allowing intellectual property costs to be covered by funding programs, and ensuring that the other requirements do not put proprietary information in the public domain before intellectual property issues are resolved, could facilitate the commercialization of much research and development work.

Companies benefit from owning the intellectual property that emerges from their investments in research and development as it increases their evaluation, appears as an asset on a balance sheet, is expected by their investors and purchasers, and it imposes a barrier to entry for competition. With removed barriers to commercialization and technology transfers within program requirements, the federal government can increase demand for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics graduates.

Maximizing Talent and Knowledge

Overall, Canada’s engineering profession is finding it difficult to attract and retain highly qualified professionals for positions. There are some indications of dwindling talent in the areas of computer and information sciences, applied mathematics and computer software engineering. In engineering, mechanical, electrical, and civil engineering remain the disciplines with the largest undergraduate enrolment, in that order. In 2013, the three major engineering disciplines “accounted for 52.4% of undergraduate enrolments [in Canada]. This is down marginally from the 54.0% share of enrolments in 2009.”[ii]

Engineers Canada supports and agrees with the federal government’s investment in research, development, and innovation in Canada. By developing a strategic approach to investment, streamlining program delivery helping to create the conditions to attract talent and knowledge both here and from abroad, and by drawing on linkages between businesses, academia, professionals, and the government, the federal government can help foster increased research and development investments in Canada that benefit hard working Canadians.

 

[i] CBC News (2015). “Canada slipping behind on innovation, says advisory council.” Retrieved online October 03, 2016 from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/innovation-report-1.3347081.

[ii] Engineers Canada (2013). “Canadian Engineers for Tomorrow: Trends in Engineering Enrolment and Degrees Awarded: 2009-2013.” Retrieved September 9, 2016 from: https://www.engineerscanada.ca/sites/default/files/enrolmentreport2013-en-3.pdf.

 

Credit: Engineers Canada

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Research & Develop "What comes Next?"

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/22/2016 1477155288
The Next Technical ‘Shift’ is a simple one, just as it has usually been, a culmination on Techniques/Findings/etc, which Create or Conclud .... Read more

The Next Technical ‘Shift’ is a simple one, just as it has usually been, a culmination on Techniques/Findings/etc, which Create or Conclude, in a massive bend of how things are done, an answer that is Autonomous in its ability to change everything.

“It is not the next (insert things) that the World really needs or cares that much about, it will be the next technical 'shift' that somebody is going to come up with that will automatically change everything. It does not even have to too complicated, just completely new.”

I was spurred on by a Question which was asked to me by Mr. Beattie, put in such a way, that I’ve since forgotten its exact wording. Subconsciously I quite enjoyed the Challenge of coming up with an answer, yet I was surprised at how quickly I had a solid example; a collection of similar Ideas I had been working on previously, plus recent innovations, would combine into a wonderful take, on the newAge that could be possible. (I wonder if there will come a Fork with multiple Ages to take, at some point)It is most certainly New, but it still draws from our Achievements in the Past, and will become even greater by Achievements of the Future.

“What will this something be that can change everything the way the computer did, or the combustion engine did, or the age of steam, or before the bronze age?”

We all have the Ability to do Great Things, and I believe in you, and I believe in me, so let us give it a try…

I still have to securely solidify how this Concept becomes Reality, but I know I have something that is worth giving a chance. That farseeing mind that envisions unique creations into existence, questions the content outside of the box, and seeks to find that which has never been found.

“It is imaginatively gifted people like you, Joshua, that have a sort of far-seeing mind. It is the far-seeing mind that can see things before anybody else sees them. And it is the far seeing mind that sees things before they even exist.”

Credit: Dean Beattie

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Deacidification of Dated Materials at Library and Archives Canada

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/21/2016 1477066572
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Funding for Deacidification project to restore dated materials at Library and Archives Canada (LARC: Deacidification project will require research str .... Read more

Funding for Deacidification project to restore dated materials at Library and Archives Canada (LARC: Deacidification project will require research strength and innovative of NRC to preserve national treasures kept at LARC. Once deacidification process is complete, materials should be made accessible publicly; this will require computer engineer to assist with virtual access.

Credit: Library of Congress

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Employer-directed training

Question:How can colleges play a larger role in the innovation ecosystem?
on 10/19/2016 1476892293
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The government should support employer-directed training and, following on its commitment in the Budget, encourage partnerships among employers and po .... Read more

The government should support employer-directed training and, following on its commitment in the Budget, encourage partnerships among employers and post-secondary educational institutions to align what is taught with the needs of employers, including new co-op placements and work-integrated learning opportunities.  This should include skilled workers in the residential construction.

Colleges should also be encouraged to continue expanding their research initiatives with industry and government support.

Credit: Canadian Home Builders' Association

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Government role in essential non-proprietary research that is in the national public interest

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/19/2016 1476892252
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It is important to recognize and bolster the government role in essential non-proprietary research that is in the national public interest —this .... Read more

It is important to recognize and bolster the government role in essential non-proprietary research that is in the national public interest —this is particularly true in residential construction.

For the residential construction industry, collaborative research between industry and Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), the National Research Council and Natural Resources Canada has had a significant positive impact on the quality of our housing and communities, and has enabled Canadians to consider themselves among the best housed nations in the world.

The full mandate of CMHC, including housing research and development, needs to be supported in order for the federal government to achieve its goals and fulfill its role in the provision of housing to Canadians. CMHC’s technical research and development supports industry innovation, identifying opportunities to increase productivity and reduce costs while at the same time making continued improvements in housing quality and choice.

NRCan (in the area of energy efficiency) and NRC (through Canada’s National Model Construction Codes development system and supporting the development of innovative technologies) also provide important support and research to the industry in their respective areas.

Cuts to these departments and agencies have dramatically reduced their research capacity in recent years, and a reinvestment is in need to support research to continue to improve Canada’s housing affordability through better-built houses that cost the same or less.

Credit: Canadian Home Builders' Association

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Gather anonymized genetic data from hospitals and labs to fuel AI based medical research

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/19/2016 1476880110
We have a world leading reputation for health care. We've spent a ton on the health infohighway to allow data to be shared. We're well placed for the .... Read more

We have a world leading reputation for health care. We've spent a ton on the health infohighway to allow data to be shared. We're well placed for the future: Artificial Intelligence based medical research. To get there, of course, we'll need to invest in AI and the PHDs that will develop it. But, they'll need data. MOUNTAINS of it. And they simply don't have it because Canadians aren't able to give it. 

Yet, they give bio samples all the time: Canada Blood Services, tests at the lab, etc...

So, why don't take these opportunities to take these samples and have them anonymized and analyzed and collected into a vast pool of genetic data--protected by the Governments of Canada--so our researchers can use to make us healthier?

Canadians are game.

They sign organ donor cards to help others in the after life; they'll surely agree to sign a permission to analyze material they're already giving to make themselves and others healthier. 

We say people are our greatest strength. That's truer than we think. 

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Greater Vision Is Required To Develop New "Greener and Cleaner" Economy

Question:How can we increase demand for science, technology, engineering and math graduates?
on 10/18/2016 1476818875
Larger ideas would make the idea of a greener country and culture more exciting and therefore more possible as we create exciting employment opportuni .... Read more

Larger ideas would make the idea of a greener country and culture more exciting and therefore more possible as we create exciting employment opportunities in many areas of the economy! Let's not only look for Band-Aid solutions to clean up existing technologies or approaches, but instead, create ways to utilize new and budding methodologies to augment those that already exist. For example, what can we do with rainwater that falls on the roofs of office towers and runs off 20+ storeys to augment the amount of electricity it uses? 

Of course a lot of alternatives already exist and some such as tidal energy in the Bay of Fundy is still at the developmental phase, but Canada should take it to the next level by combining existing alternatives while discovering new ones. 

 

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Canada will spend $800 million on a few lanes it can dominate globally. But the question of how they’ll pick the lucky sectors will be tricky politics

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/17/2016 1476728518
Tags:
“I really do think we need to pick some lanes, so to speak, to pick some focus areas, some sectors, some technology areas,”  &ld .... Read more

“I really do think we need to pick some lanes, so to speak, to pick some focus areas, some sectors, some technology areas,”

 “We can’t afford do it all. We have to pick some spots and specialize and really be excellent at them.”

http://ww2.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/2016/10/12/202934855

MACLEANS

October 12, 2016

 

Credit: Stephen Carlisle, GM Canada President

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Treat colleges in the same way as universities

Question:How can colleges play a larger role in the innovation ecosystem?
on 10/15/2016 1476503288
Tags: accelerators  growth 
The research in colleges can contribute to regional development,including through the transfer of activities to companies and organizations from diffe .... Read more

The research in colleges can contribute to regional development,including through the transfer of activities to companies and organizations from different backgrounds.Here are other advantages for the research in colleges:"

 The research also participates in successful research university teams.Moreover, the presence of researchers enriches teaching in colleges and stimulates students' interest in scientific careers."(Education et Enseignement supérieur Québec,http://www.education.gouv.qc.ca/colleges/enseignants-et-personnel-de-college/cctt/)

By treating colleges in the same way as universities,as per all the Federal-funded programs,colleges will play a larger role in the innovation ecosystem.A substantial increase in the funding for science is justified.

 

Credit: Education et Enseignement Supérieur Québec

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Increase the funding of Mitacs

Question:How can we increase demand for science, technology, engineering and math graduates?
on 10/15/2016 1476497864
Tags: accelerators  growth 
Mitacs is doing a great job . More funding will increase demand for science,technology and math graduates and we will make best use of our science and .... Read more

Mitacs is doing a great job . More funding will increase demand for science,technology and math graduates and we will make best use of our science and  research strengths.With more funding,Mitacs  will be able expand its program.

Credit: Mitacs'website

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Wage subsidy for science,technology,engineering and math graduates.

Question:How can we increase demand for science, technology, engineering and math graduates?
on 10/15/2016 1476495317
Tags: accelerators  growth 
By looking in the Canadian occupation project system,  the occupation outlook range from surplus( computer programmer and interactive media developer .... Read more

By looking in the Canadian occupation project system,  the occupation outlook range from surplus( computer programmer and interactive media developer,web designer and developer,electronic service technician,support technician and information systems technician) to shortage.From the information gathered, it seems these graduates are not in the right places( small medium businesses and medium businesses).

     To solve the issue, there could be wage subsidies for hiring science,technology,engineering and math graduates for small business and medium business.The wage subsidy could vary,depending  on the company's total revenue.

     The  professions part of the  surplus  outlook should not be part of  the subsidy program in order to be efficient to the most and to not waste resources. The career connect ICT wage subsidy program could serve as model for the new program. A company should not be eligible to the career connect ICT wage subsidy and the new program at the same time.

More science, technology,engineering and math graduates hired by small business and medium business equal to more growth nationally and more growth for the businesses.

Source: 

National Occupation Classification

Canadian Occupational Projection System

Career Connect ICT wage subsidy : http://www.ictc-ctic.ca/what-we-do/programs/talent-programs/employers/

http://www.canadabusiness.ca/eng/

Credit: Canada Business Network;Information and Communications Technology Council

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Increase competition

Question:How can we increase demand for science, technology, engineering and math graduates?
on 10/15/2016 1476494447
Tags: accelerators  growth 
There is not enough innovation in Canada .There is a lot offered on the supply-side (Federal government help,Provincial government help,Mitacs,Researc .... Read more

There is not enough innovation in Canada .There is a lot offered on the supply-side (Federal government help,Provincial government help,Mitacs,Research Councils...) but the demand from the businesses is lagging. To solve the problem and spur innovation , the Federal government needs to work with the Provinces in order to increase the competition across all sectors. More competition will generate more demand for science,technology,engineering and math graduates.

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Harvesting energy from hurricanes

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/14/2016 1476471849
A huge amount of clean, renewable energy goes untapped every year, and that's the energy pent up in hurricanes.  The technology to float platforms in .... Read more

A huge amount of clean, renewable energy goes untapped every year, and that's the energy pent up in hurricanes.  The technology to float platforms into hurricanes and to extract the wind energy from them already exists.  All that is needed is to bring all the related technologies together into a platform design so as to harvest this energy and then make it available for use on shore.  Here is a 20 minute YouTube video I have produced that explains this idea and how it would work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvcUu1e7aIU

This is a project that Canada could fund itself or lead in an international consortium to realize this innovation.

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More funding for Canada's Research Councils

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/13/2016 1476324607
Tags: accelerators  growth 
In order to achieve Global  science excellence, More funding for Canada's research councils is needed. With more funding, there will be more scholar .... Read more

In order to achieve Global  science excellence, More funding for Canada's research councils is needed. With more funding, there will be more scholarship and awards given, more research will be done and the economic growth will be higher.

Credit: Natural sciences and Engineering Research council of Canada's website.

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NCE networks: A model for bridging innovation gaps

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/11/2016 1476218424
Tags:
Any consideration of innovation and research in Canada must take into account the successful track record of the federally funded Networks of Centres .... Read more

Any consideration of innovation and research in Canada must take into account the successful track record of the federally funded Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCEs), a program specifically designed to overcome innovation gaps.

We strongly encourage those developing Canada's Innovation Agenda and undertaking the Science Review to consider the value of the NCE model to Canada.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/10/nau201610184418213.htm

NCE networks: A model for bridging innovation gapsAllerGen NCE Inc.

Credit: Paddy Moore, AllerGen NCE Inc.

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Government Consultation: Highlighting the Role of Colleges and Institutes in Canada's Innovation Ecosystem

Question:How can colleges play a larger role in the innovation ecosystem?
on 10/11/2016 1476218280
Tags:
To foster an Entrepreneurial and Creative Society and Compete in a Digital World, the federal government must invest in people to deliver and mainta .... Read more
  • To foster an Entrepreneurial and Creative Society and Compete in a Digital World, the federal government must invest in people to deliver and maintain an innovation-ready workforce equipped with the skills and experience to meet the rapidly evolving needs of the labour market, generate and implement new ideas and technologies, grow companies, and adapt readily to the changing global market;
  • To expand and exploit Global Science Excellence, support World Leading Clusters and Partnerships and increase the Ease of Doing Business, Canada should unlock local innovation by providing regional partners, particularly SMEs, with more and easier access to applied research capacity to develop, adapt and market their products and services in new ways and to maximize their contributions to value chains and the development of world-leading clusters;
  • And to Grow Companies and Accelerate Clean Growth, the government must support the creation and growth of SMEs, including those in clean-tech, by providing student and community entrepreneurs with the training, advice, services and connections required to start and scale new companies that can move into global markets.

http://www.infomedia.gc.ca/ic/articles/restricted/2016/10/nau20161023316304.htm

Government Consultation: Highlighting the Role of Colleges and Institutes in Canada's Innovation EcosystemColleges & Institutes Canada @CICanOctober 3, 2016

Credit: Colleges & Institutes Canada

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Encourage research and development in private sector

Question:How can we increase demand for science, technology, engineering and math graduates?
on 10/10/2016 1476116571
Tags:
A primarily service economy, cannot be at the same time an innovation economy. Government funding of research in Canada is sub par in many respects. .... Read more

A primarily service economy, cannot be at the same time an innovation economy.

Government funding of research in Canada is sub par in many respects.  There also needs to be a better recognition that basic science research, not directly linked to industrial applications, is very important. Current attitudes, look for instant gratification instead of a longer term vision.  Scandinavian countries (with smaller economies than Canada) should be emulated, in their willingness to *fully* fund basic science and research. 

Gov't should encourage businesses to do research and development. Closer partnership between universities and industry in education in the applied sciences, joint MSc and PhD programs with companies an Universities.  

Tax credits for private sector research should be targeted to such partnerships, and be results oriented -- how many graduated, how many hired. Higher education should not be a quest to produce as many graduates as possible, but rather a quest to match demand with supply. If universities bore at least some of the burden of matching graduates with employers, we would end up with better curricular, and better alignment of numbers of graduates with the national/regional job futures.

It is unfortunate that the Gov't Job Futures projections does not include scientific research as an independent category, rather it is buried deep under "other" professional services.

 

 

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design,innovation and invention

Question:How can we increase demand for science, technology, engineering and math graduates?
on 10/10/2016 1476090577
Tags:
Dear Sirs: Good day. I grew up sorrounded by machineries for a family-owned manufacturing corporation.In 1964 I accidentally discovered nature's for .... Read more

Dear Sirs:

Good day.

I grew up sorrounded by machineries for a family-owned manufacturing corporation.In 1964 I accidentally discovered nature's force that someday somehow I maybe able to harness it.In 2014 I had made my 64th prototype of an edson power plant(hydraulics design power plant)my namesake for I could not find an alternative industrial name for it and a better chance for understanding.In 1974 I discovered that mosquitos are attracted to music.In 2015 I offered my mosquito extinguisher through music to our Secretary of Health- Department of Health(DOH) for further research & development to no avail.This year 2016 I have a crude prototype of the technology.In 1979 through fearless research and development on electrons that almost knocked me down and almost burned our house to the ground I discovered the electric impulse(wireless)driven car powered by a 110/220 volts AC/DC electrical currents but due to lack of funds I was not able to provide a  crude prototype because there are two areas to consider.one is the electrons capacity to jump which is already have a solution  and the hardest part is the non-electrocution of humans itself.

You might be interested on its technology I am more than willing to collaborate.

Thank you.

 

Sincerely,

Edson R. Cagape

Credit: n/a

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Proposal for the Canada Nation of Innovators Initiative Creation of a Global Science Excellence Matching Investment Fund (GSEMIF)

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/05/2016 1475684792
Tags:
see attached
Credit: Atlantic Cancer Research Institute

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Scientific Consulting Firms

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/04/2016 1475601567
I think there's an increasing need for consultants in the field of science and research in order to make use of the research findings. Consultants sh .... Read more

I think there's an increasing need for consultants in the field of science and research in order to make use of the research findings. Consultants should know about the policy, regulations, science, and business behind transforming research findings into useful knowledge. They should be well-equipped with the skill of knowledge translation because there are many research findings that cannot be translated into a product without help from other researchers. Canadian scientists and researchers produce a lot of papers about their research that is cited by researchers around the world, yet a small portion of those findings are actually used. 

There's an article on the Canadian Institute of Health Research that indicates that even though 4.1% of the world's research publications are produced in Canada, Canada only holds 1.7% of the world's patents. There needs to be a way for researchers to profit by collaborating with consulting firms and other researchers to transfer their research findings into meaningful contributions to society, even if those contributions aren't material-based. I would propose a collaborative effort to strengthen the field of science and research once scientists publish their findings.

Credit: Cardno ChemRisk, Canadian Institute of Health Research

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Build Arctic Deep Seaports Along Northwest Passage

Question:How can we increase demand for science, technology, engineering and math graduates?
on 10/04/2016 1475593254
Tags:
Build Arctic Deep Seaports along Northwest Passage (NWP): from MacKenzie Bay (NT) to Cape Dyer (NU). Building infrastructure in Arctic region require .... Read more

Build Arctic Deep Seaports along Northwest Passage (NWP): from MacKenzie Bay (NT) to Cape Dyer (NU). Building infrastructure in Arctic region require collaboration among several departments: NRC, NDC, U of Calgary, Public Safety Canada. Global warming has greater effects on warming Arctic, more commercial and recreational ships are roaming the lower Arctic. Canada shall have Federal deep seaports for various operations such as sovereignty patrol, Arctic Research, Cold Technology infrastructures, Canada North Warning system (Canada’s own) Building Arctic Deep Seaports need specialized scientist, engineers and human resources from various fields.

Credit: NRC, PSC, NDC, U of Calgary

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NCE networks: A model for bridging innovation gaps

Question:How do we make best use of our science and research strengths?
on 10/04/2016 1475591153
Any consideration of innovation and research in Canada must take into account the successful track record of the federally funded Networks of Centres .... Read more

Any consideration of innovation and research in Canada must take into account the successful track record of the federally funded Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCEs), a program specifically designed to overcome innovation gaps.

This submission represents the collective voice of Canada’s NCE networks (12 current, 32 former) awarded by the Networks of Centres of Excellence program—all of which were created to fast-track the mobilization of research into tangible impacts that benefit Canadian society and its economic development.

We understand that any major review is wise to gather international perspectives and learn from elsewhere. We applaud this effort.

We make this submission to your review process to highlight that other countries have, in fact, looked to Canada and its NCE program as a model—one specifically designed to overcome innovation gaps.

NCE networks embody six elements that are critical to successful innovation. They provide evidence-based solutions to important problems by bringing the best minds into teams that develop and support innovative ideas. They build multidisciplinary networks needed to move an idea into real-world application, by connecting academia, communities, industry and governments. They train Canada’s future experts and leaders to connect across sectors. They transform Canada into a virtual, cutting-edge lab by networking access to state-of-the-art infrastructure and expertise. NCEs actively manage their investments to ensure project teams meet milestones and deliver socioeconomic benefits to Canadians.

Quick facts about NCE networks

  • Networks have helped train more than 45,000 highly qualified personnel (HQP) and create 147 spin-off companies.
  • Since 1989, the federal government has invested approximately $1.8 billion in NCE networks for research, commercialization and knowledge translation. Those investments have leveraged $1.2 billion in contributions from industry and other partners.
  • In 2014-15, there were 2,054 partners involved in the networks, including 567 from industry.

We know it works

For more than a quarter century, NCEs have had a record of success with landmark discoveries and high-impact achievements that include:

  • Inspiring countries around the world to follow the lead of the Canadian Stroke Strategy—which promotes and implements organized stroke care, resulting in countless lives saved and improved. (Canadian Stroke Network)
  • Creating what is now Canada’s largest internship program, Mitacs Accelerate, for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows of all disciplines—a program that started as a way to connect industry with advanced mathematical sciences graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. It continues as an important legacy of the initial NCE. (MITACS)
  • Changing the way bridges and dams are built around the world by merging civil engineering with electronics to create stronger structures and “smarter” structures that monitor their health in real time as they are subjected to the stresses of nature. (Intelligent Sensing for Innovative Structures)

 Current NCEs are following in this tradition:

  • A major breakthrough for treating early, aggressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS) that uses stem cells and chemotherapy to eradicate MS in a small subset of patients, which is anticipated to become the new standard of care internationally. (Stem Cell Network)
  • A comprehensive suite of studies examining the impacts of climate change on regional ecosystems, societies and human populations is being modelled by the international Arctic Council for its Adaptation Action for a Changing Arctic assessment. (ArcticNet)
  • A Canadian-led study used deep genome sequencing to identify genetic underpinnings of autism that could enable diagnosis early enough to provide effective treatment. (NeuroDevNet)

These are but a few examples. There is much to be learned from the accomplishments of this innovative, multi-sectoral, multidisciplinary program. The groundbreaking NCE program is vital to Canada’s innovation landscape moving forward—a strong feature to build upon. We strongly encourage those developing Canada’s Innovation Agenda and undertaking the Science Review to consider the value of the NCE model to Canada.

For our full submission, please read the attached document.

Credit: Canada's 12 currently funded NCE networks

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