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Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 12/02/2016 1480715966
INTRODUCTION Mining requires a complex network of skills in engineering, business, and trades.  These skills are developed by a strong educational s .... Read more

INTRODUCTION

Mining requires a complex network of skills in engineering, business, and trades.  These skills are developed by a strong educational system that teaches science, technology, engineering, financial literacy, business, math, social science and the arts.  However, young people must also learn how to embrace change, take smart risks and be resourceful. In the workforce, a great way for young people to build technical competence while practicing these soft skills is through the long-term application under the advisement of a competent entrepreneur or business leader.

The Ultra-Deep Mining Network (UDMN) is a Business-Led Network Centre of Excellence comprised of mining industry leaders, academia, mining supply and service companies.  UDMN believes in equipping entrepreneurs  and young thought leaders with the right skills and experience for the future economy through active roles in UDMN supported projects. The concept of a business-led network provides a challenging environment that attracts the most skilled and creative thinkers, thus providing connectivity and global visibility to accelerate their careers.

CHALLENGES

For entrepreneurs, the task of training the next generation of entrepreneurs can be extremely valuable, but risky.  When a promising young employee begins work, they often lack the experience and skills to perform at the same level as a tenured employee.  Sometimes when an entrepreneur invests upfront in young employees (through training, education and mentoring), they decide to take their new skills and leave the company for a competitor or become an entrepreneur themselves (and perhaps a competitor).  

SOLUTIONS

It is important to train mining industry entrepreneurs the skills necessary to mentor young professionals, while also ensuring they have the right growth mindset necessary to value mentorship. This could mean direct, sector specific training and support for hiring, leadership, and implementing tactics for developing talent, along with courses on leadership for enabling business growth.  By expanding Canadian entrepreneurs’ management capabilities, we secure the best trainers for the next generation of Canadian entrepreneurs.   

*Note:  For information about the Ultra-Deep Mining Network, please visit: https://www.miningdeep.ca/

Credit: Ultra-Deep Mining Network

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Pour une formation multidisciplinaire en sciences et technologies

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 11/21/2016 1479754997
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La capacité à recombiner les connaissances est une dimension essentielle à l’innovation, ce qui fait appel à la nécessité de diversifier l .... Read more

La capacité à recombiner les connaissances est une dimension essentielle à l’innovation, ce qui fait appel à la nécessité de diversifier la participation et la collaboration des différentes parties prenantes dans les écosystèmes innovants d’un point de vue disciplinaire et sectoriel. Or, à l’heure actuelle, autant au niveau de la jeune carrière de chercheur qu’à celui de la formation initiale, c’est la monodisciplinarité qui domine. D’une part, les subventions et les publications scientifiques forcent les chercheurs à suivre un parcours limitant l’interdisciplinarité. D’autre part, les formations universitaires sont généralement très spécialisées, ne laissant pas la place des projets pédagogiques multi-facultaires et multi-établissements. Une telle structure ne permet pas le développement de compétences d’ouverture et de travail d’équipe, pourtant recherchées par les entreprises. Ces dernières ont aussi une responsabilité importante dans le développement d’une société entrepreneuriale et créatrice. Elles sont encore trop frileuses face au recrutement de diplômés des études supérieures, qui, avec leur expertise en résolution de problèmes et en analyse critique, réussissent à sortir des sentiers battus et à trouver des solutions innovantes – donnant ainsi aux entreprises un avantage compétitif majeur. Bref, les universités, les gouvernements et les entreprises doivent s’adapter à un contexte de plus en plus multidisciplinaire et intersectoriel.

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Build a learning framework for STEM education - Canada 2067

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 11/15/2016 1479225940
Seventy per cent of the top jobs in Canada today require some STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) skills – and this number i .... Read more

Seventy per cent of the top jobs in Canada today require some STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) skills – and this number is growing every year. That said, less than half of Canadian high school students graduate with senior level science and math courses and only one in five graduate with the prerequisites to pursue engineering.

At Let’s Talk Science, we are committed to helping youth build the competencies they need to become innovators, critical thinkers and problem solvers ready to meet the challenges of an increasingly demanding economy through education in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

STEM learning builds competencies and characteristics that are needed for all jobs – things like critical thinking, problem solving, information management, positive risk taking, resiliency, effective communication and more. As the world rapidly changes, work and citizenship demands will require greater capacity in STEM.

Canada 2067 is our bold new nation-building initiative that will bring Canadians together to develop a STEM learning framework.

With Canada 2067, we are calling on Canadians to join the conversation on STEM education by visiting http://canada2067.ca and filling out our online learning framework questionnaire.

The contributions of Canadians through this initiative will contribute to a STEM learning framework for the next 50 years – and will help us to evolve and strengthen Canada’s education model for the 21st century by enhancing student exposure and access to the STEM disciplines across all levels and areas of learning.

Together, we’ll make sure Canadian youth have the skills they need to face the future with confidence.

 

About Let’s Talk Science: Let's Talk Science is an award-winning national, charitable organization. Over the past twenty years, we have worked with educators to support learning and skill development. We’ve developed hands-on programs for Kindergarten to Grade 12 youth to get them interested in STEM at an early age and keep them engaged as they move through high school. Our goal is to motivate and empower youth to fulfill their potential and prepare for their future careers and roles as citizens.

Credit: Let's Talk Science, Canada 2067

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Ensuring that SMEs Have Access to Skilled Employees and Encouraging the Next Generation of Innovators

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 11/04/2016 1478282522
Skilled labour remains the top concern of SMEs looking to innovate. As significant funds are already being invested in post-secondary institutions, go .... Read more

Skilled labour remains the top concern of SMEs looking to innovate. As significant funds are already being invested in post-secondary institutions, governments must ensure that these investments translate into actual results for small businesses. The focus should remain on job-ready graduates who are able to fill labour gaps across sectors of the economy.

  • Work with the provinces to reform the education system to improve basic skills training, including building job-readiness skills, and to reach out more to the small business community when creating curriculums;
  • Better co-operation and coordination with other levels of government, as well as post-secondary institutions, to focus funding on programs linked to the employment market;
  • Better communication by governments with small business owners on which programs and services that may be able to assist with training in their business.
  • Review existing tax credit programs to promote hiring and retention, and introduce new tax credits such as an EI training credit or EI holiday for youth hiring that recognize the investment in both formal and informal training made by small employers when they expand their payroll;
  • Recognize the importance of informal training in small businesses by designing a federal training tax credit based on existing government reporting and filing requirements, such as payroll-based EI;

* For full list of recommendations, see attached CFIB report on SMEs and innovation, Beyond the Big Idea: Redefining and Rethinking the Innovation Agenda 

 

Credit: Canadian Federation of Independent Business

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Campus-based incubators and accelerators

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 11/04/2016 1478278192
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The community and regional relationships that are so integral to their day-to-day operations also make colleges and institutes natural centres for bus .... Read more

The community and regional relationships that are so integral to their day-to-day operations also make colleges and institutes natural centres for business networking, mentoring and entrepreneurship. The development of entrepreneurship skills is embedded in curriculum, with specialized courses and programs available to develop the next generation of entrepreneurs. Increasingly, institutions are creating campus-based incubators and accelerators and actively collaborating with similar organizations in their communities to provide students and others with the support and services required to develop and launch new businesses.

 

For example, Georgian College provides mentorship, networking, funding and training for entrepreneurs at it Henry Bernick Entrepreneurship Centre. At Centennial College, the Centre of Entrepreneurship (COE) is part of the Applied Research, Innovation and Entrepreneurship Services (ARIES) offered by the college. The award-winning centre offers incubation and acceleration programs in support of local entrepreneurs. And finally, Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC) provides free entrepreneurial resources, financial support, professional development and consulting for its students, faculty and staff.

 

These are only three examples of the many offerings of colleges and institutes across the country to help equip youth with the skills for the future economy.

 

Read more in CICan’s full submission to the Innovation Agenda here: http://bit.ly/2ebHwvv

 

Credit: Colleges and Institutes Canada

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College and institute partnerships with SMEs

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 11/04/2016 1478278030
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Colleges and institutes occupy a significant niche in Canada’s research ecosystem, having capitalized on their community connections and modest .... Read more

Colleges and institutes occupy a significant niche in Canada’s research ecosystem, having capitalized on their community connections and modest federal investments in applied research to respond to the distinct innovation needs of local and regional partners, particularly small and medium enterprises (SMEs). In 2014-15 colleges and institutes worked with over 6000 partners, 86% of them SMEs or micro-enterprises, to improve or develop new products, prototypes, processes and services. They also conduct joint research projects with universities to develop new technologies, commercialize the results of fundamental research.

 

For example The Yukon Research Centre at Yukon College has partnered with a major copper mine development in central Yukon to evaluate the potential spread of contaminants in selected northern wetland species in a project which supports innovation and mine remediation technologies in the north. Another project at College of the North Atlantic (CNA) is working to develop a pump that could provide water for aquaculture operations inland. The team has developed a wave-powered device to pump water to shore for a land-based aquaculture pilot farm.

 

Research projects such as these are fundamental in addressing the environmental and economic needs of the future, and equipping youth with the skills to succeed.

 

Read more in CICan’s full submission to the Innovation Agenda here: http://bit.ly/2ebHwvv

Credit: Colleges and Institutes Canada

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Work-Integrated Learning and skills for the future economy

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 11/04/2016 1478267175
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Colleges and institutes are leaders in providing work-integrated learning (WIL) to provide students with the skills they will need to be successful in .... Read more

Colleges and institutes are leaders in providing work-integrated learning (WIL) to provide students with the skills they will need to be successful in the workplace. 

Through industry partnerships, colleges and institutes offer students valuable hands-on learning opportunities. For example, Northern College’s partnership with several mining companies allows students to learn workplace skills in both surface and underground drilling environments. Sault College also recently re-opened its Willow Teaching Restaurant which allows students in Culinary Management and Chef Training programs to gain industry experience in an operational restaurant.

WIL opportunities are invaluable experiences for students starting off their careers. By introducing financial incentives to help employers, particularly SMEs, reduce and offset the costs of hiring co-op students and interns, we can increase the number and quality of WIL opportunities, ensuring that Canada is equipped with an “innovation-ready workforce.”

 

Read more in CICan’s full submission to the Innovation Agenda here: http://bit.ly/2ebHwvv

Credit: Colleges and Institutes Canada

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STEM Initiatives and Accessible Resources

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/31/2016 1477933468
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STEM Education Canada is consistently in need of new technologies which makes it extremely important for industries, organizations, and governments t .... Read more

STEM Education

Canada is consistently in need of new technologies which makes it extremely important for industries, organizations, and governments to develop and learn new approaches in order to effectively use what we already have in new and innovative ways. Foundational skills in STEM through education will ultimately prepare Canada’s youth with the right skills for the future economy and for any career path that students choose to pursue. The federal government has promised significant commitments to areas including: (1) knowledge economy; (2) rebuilding aging infrastructure; and (3) climate change adaptation and mitigation.

“Let’s Talk Science,” a charitable organization in Canada, outlined in their 2013 report that the federal government spends approximately $50 billion on kindergarten to grade twelve education; however, “less than 50 per cent of Canadian high school students graduate with senior STEM courses.”[i] This is an alarming statistic as approximately 70 per cent of Canada’s top jobs require STEM education – a percentage that will continue to grow in the coming years[ii]. To ensure Canadian youth are prepared to meet the coming challenges in these fields it is vastly important that the federal government invests and supports early childhood STEM education.

STEM education drives innovation, establishes competitive businesses, and creates jobs for long-term prosperity throughout Canada. FedDev Ontario’s report entitled “Archived – Government of Canada Funding Encourages Youth to Pursue Careers in Science” (2012) focused on the Government of Canada’s investment of more than $1.7 million to BrainSTEM, an outreach program launched by the Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics in 2012, that worked to promote STEM educational fields for youth across Ontario. The report outlined that “by introducing students to the STEM fields… [the Government of Canada was] encouraging the next generation of innovators, entrepreneurs, and problem solvers to drive innovation” (FedDev, 2012).  The report highlighted that STEM programs and education are essential stepping stones towards driving innovation throughout Canada. Government investments for STEM outreach programs allow for students to see the valuable emerging careers in STEM related fields. Continuous government support for STEM programs and educational fields will prepare Canadian youth to become leaders and innovative influencers of the future.

Youth are important in ensuring that Canada makes its innovative mark on the world stage and continues to have the intellectual capital to support our own domestic knowledge-based economy. Government support for STEM programs will foster a culture of innovation, build upon skills that work to embrace rapid global changes, and will encourage Canada’s youth to enter into STEM related professions. The federal government should continue to collaborate with regulated professions, such as engineering, in order to support this endeavour.

Federal government support for STEM initiatives should include federal funding of STEM institutions, continued support towards strengthening the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSCERC) and its contribution to STEM at all levels, specifically NSERC’s funding for outreach activities like Chairs for Women in Science and Engineering Program (CWSE) and Promoscience. Federal funding should also be directed towards research and education within the field of engineering, as well as support efforts to increase participation of individuals from groups within Canadian society who have been traditionally underrepresented within the engineering profession. The National Science Foundation highlights that, “[s]ignificant advancement of [underrepresented] groups will result in a new generation of promising STEM talent and leadership to secure our nation’s future in science and technology.”[iii]

The federal government should continue to have open and transparent collaboration with provinces and territories to ensure that STEM is a priority, and that STEM initiatives are promoted to strengthen Canada’s future; specifically through grants and youth education programs. Engineers Canada will be available for consultation with the federal government to provide valuable expertise in achieving these goals.

The federal government must also leverage STEM education to drive Canada’s global competitiveness and to promote our innovation agenda internationally. In order to do so, the government should strive to celebrate the achievements of academics, students and youth in STEM related programs and disciplines annually through various national awards and scholarships. The federal government’s support for youth achievements across Canada, in STEM related fields, works to sustain their interest in innovative and forward thinking. Government support also works to support youth’s interests in disciplines and programs that are required to support Canada’s future economic needs. The federal government needs to formally recognize youth achievements or invest in organizations to do so on their behalf. The federal government must collaborate with regulated professions across the country, such as the engineering profession, in order to become more actively involved in highlighting youth strengths and achievements.

Indigenous Youth Access to STEM

Proactive and long-term education strategies must include investments in building students fundamental STEM skills. This strategic approach will help Canada maintain its capacity for producing highly trained and skilled individuals to face the challenges of our rapidly changing world.

Canada is currently facing a severe underrepresentation of self-identified Indigenous youth in STEM related programs at the post-secondary level. Indigenous ways of knowing, philosophies, and educational practices are extremely valuable to the development of Canada’s STEM education. By weaving Indigenous cultures and ways of knowing within STEM education across Canada, it has the potential to promote and strengthen Indigenous youth engagement in STEM fields as well as to promote innovative thinking throughout education. The federal government must remain supportive of Indigenous population’s engagement in STEM fields and must actively work to support pathways that aim to increase Indigenous representation in STEM professions across Canada.

Some organizations are actively working to advance and promote the engineering profession in Canada for underrepresented groups. The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) strives to have stronger representation of Indigenous North Americans in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines in Canada. AISES has continued to be a leader in providing STEM opportunities for Indigenous Peoples, specifically by providing pre-college, college, and professional programs that encourage the representation of Indigenous Peoples representation in STEM disciplines and institutions.[iv] This organization is supporting pathways that increase Indigenous Peoples representation in STEM.

Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) is also actively promoting innovative thinking through its education programs. CSIRO has designed a five-year Indigenous STEM education program in Australia that is funded by the BHP Billiton Foundation that works to promote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representation in STEM-related fields. According to CSIRO’s website, the five-year Indigenous STEM education program “is currently being implemented across Queensland, New South Wales and Western Australia with expansion into South Australia in 2017.”[v]

CSIRO’s five-year Indigenous STEM education program in Australia has worked directly with 45 individual schools across three states within Australia. The Indigenous STEM education “is currently working with these 45 schools to develop, implement and monitor Indigenous science inquiry education resources and teacher professional development…”[vi]

In order to increase Indigenous youth in STEM programs at the post-secondary level within Canada, Engineers Canada recommends that the federal government adopt educational programs that are similar to that of CSIRO’s successful Indigenous education program in Australia.

A summer program for science and technology advancement could provide ongoing interactive science inquiry activities that work to continuously engage Indigenous students, specifically in grades 9 and 10, in STEM activities, while simultaneously incorporating Indigenous cultural practices and experiences. Inquiry for Indigenous science students could use hands-on inquiry-based approaches to Indigenous learning while engaging students in science related activities. Science pathways for Indigenous communities could incorporate on-reserve “projects as the context for learning science that is linked to Indigenous ecological knowledge for primary and middle-school students in remote [Indigenous] communities.”[vii] In order to encourage Indigenous students to remain engaged in STEM fields throughout post-secondary education, it is recommended that the federal government - in partnership with provincial and territorial governments – nationally recognize the ongoing achievements of Indigenous students and academics in STEM subjects.

It is important for the federal government to continuously support STEM education for Indigenous populations as diversity drives innovative thinking. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) outlines that the “production of relevant human capital for innovation will require effective innovation in education and training systems…”[viii]The absence of a National Indigenous STEM strategy perpetuates a cyclical effect of underrepresentation of Indigenous peoples within STEM related fields. The federal government must support workplace training opportunities for Indigenous youth across Canada in order to equip Indigenous students with the rights skills to succeed in Canada’s future economy.

Fund and Support Training for Students and Recent Grads: Internships and Co-Operatives

In order to better equip Canadian youth with the right skills for the future economy, the federal government must continue to work with industry and post-secondary institutions in order to actively fund and support the training of undergraduate and graduate students in the first four years of their career paths; specifically through internships and co-operatives. Students and recent graduates are now entering into labour markets that require candidates to have greater experiences and the required skills to succeed in positions that they are entering into. Therefore, these individuals need to receive better and more frequent opportunities for on-the-job training in order to gain work experience, valuable networks, and to be better prepared for successful future employment.[ix]

The federal government should finance programs that include government subsidies for a portion of the salary to encourage employers and professionals to hire and train new staff, hold internship opportunities in in-demand fields and bridging programs. Students who are prepared to enter the workforce will contribute greatly to Canada’s economic growth. Internships and co-operatives prepare Canadian youth with the skills necessary to succeed in entry level positions and for Canada’s future economic needs.  Linking post-secondary institutions, employers, and government under one central structure to support the development of skills in line with labour market needs will work to equip Canadian youth with the skills required to succeed in the future economy.

Accessible Resources

In order to prepare youth and newcomers with the right skills for the future economy, there must be accessible and up-to-date resources that provide information about job prospects and career requirements; specifically outlining the necessary skills, credentials and experiences that are required in order for youth to be successful in their desired field of interest.  Many professions across Canada have been working diligently to support this endeavour for youth and newcomers, specifically the engineering profession in Canada.

In order to ensure that newcomers better meet the economic needs of Canadian communities and workplaces, it is imperative that visa offices, embassies, pre-arrival services and constituency offices are better equipped with the most accurate information about regulatory licensing requirements and the labour market needs of Canada’s provinces and territories. Engineers Canada has developed an online tool known as the Roadmap to Engineering in Canada; a one-stop online tool that provides up-to-date information for international engineering graduates and newcomers. The information provided includes licensing procedures in Canada, required academic qualifications to work as an engineer, as well as resources that are available prior to their arrival to help guide them through the licensing process in Canada. Engineers Canada has also developed EngScape; an online portal providing information about the engineering labour market across Canada. From employment rates and salary, to post-secondary enrolment and immigrant employment, this information is available by province and engineering discipline. Newcomers can browse the portal to determine where in the country their skills might be most needed, and they can use the site’s job search tool to view hundreds of engineering job postings from across the country.

These portals are accessible, objective and transparent in order to ensure that newcomers and all Canadians receive the best information to help them become contributing members of the engineering profession and Canadian society. The information provided by these portals assist newcomers in making informed decisions that work for them, their families and the Canadian economy. Engineers Canada believes these tools should be shared with and actively used by all employees of visa offices, embassies and pre-arrival services who could be interacting with prospective newcomers to Canada.

The federal government must continue to work with regulated professions, such as the engineering profession in Canada, in order to help support, develop and promote services and online information access points that are specific to assisting youth in their job search. Having accessible resources will equip youth and newcomers with the right skills for the future economy.

 

[i] Let’s Talk Science (2013). “We’re Losing Out- New Report on Science Learning Reveals the Economic Burden of Discounting High School Science Courses.” Retrieved online August 30, 2016 from: http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/were-losing-out---new-report-on-science-learning-reveals-the-economic-burden-of-discontinuing-high-school-science-courses-513071801.html.

[ii] Ibid.

[iii] National Science Foundation (2016). “Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG).” Retrieved October 4, 2016 from: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=12726.

[iv] AISES (2016) “About AISES.” Retrieved October 17, 2016 from: http://www.aises.org/about.

[v] CSIRO (2016). “About I2S2.” Retrieved October 4, 2016 online from: http://www.csiro.au/en/Education/Programs/Indigenous-STEM/I2S2/About-I2S2.

[vi] Ibid.

[vii] CSIRO (2016). “Indigenous STEM Education Program.” Retrieved September 15, 2016 from: http://www.csiro.au/en/Education/Programs/Indigenous-STEM.

[viii] OECD (2016). “More About Innovation Strategy for Education and Training.” Retrieved September 7, 2016 from: http://www.oecd.org/edu/moreabouttheinnovationstrategyforeducationandtraining.htm.

[ix] National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability (2015). “Engaging Youth in Work Experiences: An Innovative Strategies Practice Brief.” Retrieved online October 03, 2016 from: http://www.ncwd-youth.info/innovative-strategies/practice-briefs/engaging-youth-in-work-experiences.

Credit: Engineers Canada

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Reduce Government spending by making University free for all

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/31/2016 1477881024
My idea is simple. Take government spending that is used on high enrollment courses in universities across Canada and create an online accredited cour .... Read more

My idea is simple. Take government spending that is used on high enrollment courses in universities across Canada and create an online accredited course. After completing course material a student heads down to a government-run test facility to be properly identified and fill out an exam. If the exam is passed, then credit is given for no cost to the citizen. Low-enrollment courses could be rolled out as the program grows.

For example, statistics 101 is a common university course. Take the money that normally would be spent on 10,000s of students taking this course every year and develop a self-paced interactive impactful online statistics 101 course.  Support this course with a Q & A that is mainly community managed.  Some benefits I can think of would be as follows:

-Students learn at their own pace so they do not miss out on important concepts.

-Talented students can finish degrees faster.

-Reduced student debt.

-The course material will be presented by the top lecturers and be more current.

-Eliminate some commutes, parking, and textbook fees for students.

-Prospective students can try courses before committing to a full degree.

-Complete courses on any schedule or timeline meaning people who are employed can work towards a university degree.

-With free library computers and internet access, any Canadian can complete a university degree no matter their income.

-Immigrant Canadians can challenge courses they have taken in their previous country of residence.

-Courses can be taken casually by Canadians who are interested in a subject but not a degree.

-Eliminate entrance requirements.

 

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Teach project management and innovation course in high school college and university

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/25/2016 1477359375
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I see life a series of very important long term projects.  As a result managing our lives, developing and implementing a business plan would benefit .... Read more

I see life a series of very important long term projects.  As a result managing our lives, developing and implementing a business plan would benefit from teaching project management in high school and to all college and university students.  As solving lives problems and developing a business plan is based on innovation and the viability of the product or service I would like to suggest that innovation also be more formally taught beginning in high school and then reinforced and expanded to be taught to all first year college and university student.  I have talked to many high school students asking them if they have had to develop new products or services as part of their course and they have not.  If we want them to be more innovation then we should be challenging them to do so.  I also specifically challenge many people I meet to consider if they can save lives with the technology they know. As I consider that a very important objective. PS the tag option should be expanded to include project management and Innovation course 

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Canadian Innovator/Inventor's Pension plan

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/19/2016 1476892238
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To Create a more innovative country one must think that many young people are risk averse and to have a more innovative country we must get more of th .... Read more

To Create a more innovative country one must think that many young people are risk averse and to have a more innovative country we must get more of those young people taking chances. To do so we can reduce some of that risk by offering a pension to supplement the CPP for those years an inventor/innovator looses their CPP contributions due to taking risks that may fail. "There can be no success without failure". The country's success stands on the shoulders of those who succeed as well as those who fail. 

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Promote and support the unique skill requirements in the residential construction industry

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/19/2016 1476892085
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The government needs to work with industry to promote and support the unique skill requirements in the residential construction industry which offer r .... Read more

The government needs to work with industry to promote and support the unique skill requirements in the residential construction industry which offer rewarding and long-term careers while at the same time align with the future labour force requirements of the industry. Training programs funded by the government, including those by Employment Insurance, are most effective in equipping participants with the right skills when they are employer driven (the best way to ensure that training results in a job is to include employers in the training decisions – e.g. the Canada Job Grant).

BuildForce Canada has projected that our industry will see over 118,000 uniquely skilled workers retiring over the next decade. Therefore, promoting careers in the skilled trades, and support for training and productivity advances, will help to ensure that the residential construction industry remains a healthy economic engine for Canada and that young people will be able to access careers in our industry.

Credit: Canadian Home Builders' Association

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Finish High School with a Bachelor's Degree - Why Not?

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/17/2016 1476710077
http://wfla.com/2016/10/16/finish-high-school-with-bachelors-degree-at-1-florida-school-yes/   Tuition-free Florida Atlantic University gives smart .... Read more

http://wfla.com/2016/10/16/finish-high-school-with-bachelors-degree-at-1-florida-school-yes/  

Tuition-free Florida Atlantic University gives smart kids a chance to earn a high-school diploma along with a bachelor's degree at the same time.  Why not? Future of public education which blurs the lines between institutions and ideas. Canadian provinces and territories & the federal government should move beyond the educational divide to encourage innovation in education.

Credit: Florida Atlantic University

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Innovation through Co-operative Education

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/12/2016 1476309077
Introduction CAFCE (Canadian Association for Co-operative Education) is the voice for post-secondary co-operative education in Canada. Co-operative e .... Read more

Introduction

CAFCE (Canadian Association for Co-operative Education) is the voice for post-secondary co-operative education in Canada. Co-operative education (co-op) programs alternate periods of academic study and work experience in fields that are relevant to students’ programs of study. Students are given opportunities to test their theoretical knowledge in real-world contexts, explore a variety of careers before fully entering the workforce, and earn both valuable experience and compensation.

Co-operative education is a foundational part of Canada’s reputation as a nation full of innovative, skilled entrepreneurs. When students participate in co-op programs, they develop the professional skills — communication, teamwork, problem solving — that employees and creators need to thrive in the future economy. They’re also given the chance to watch and learn from existing innovators in their communities.

CAFCE recommends Industry Canada consider the following options as a means of furthering its Innovation Agenda:

Canada Innovation Co-op Grants

Startups and innovation businesses should be encouraged to hire Canadian co-op students through the establishment of a grant program.

How would this work?

The grant program would involve the development of partnerships between post-secondary institutions and businesses meeting a set of eligibility requirements. A portion of the grant funds would be put towards a percentage of students’ salaries, making it easier for small and medium-sized businesses to pursue innovation and plan for additional hiring.

The grants would be distributed across Canada’s provinces and territories based on a prorated distribution, i.e. more grants for provinces with a greater number of enrolled co-op students. The grants would also be spread equitably across the country’s various innovation sectors. A cap on eligible business size would be implemented to ensure the grants benefit startups and small businesses. The number of grant-eligible hires per fiscal year would also be restricted to ensure the grants’ reach across as many businesses as possible. Finally, an additional incentive could be implemented to encourage innovative businesses to hire students looking for their first co-op position.

What are the potential outcomes?

  • The creation of ground-level partnerships between startups and small businesses and post-secondary institutions (e.g. RIM’s relationship with the University of Waterloo)
  • Immediate incentives for innovation companies and startups who can support the hiring of co-op students.
  • Increased opportunity for students interested in pursuing careers in Canada’s various innovation sectors.

Co-op Entrepreneurship Program

A scholarship for co-op student innovators should be established, encouraging students to spend a term developing their own ideas and/or companies with fewer financial restrictions.

How would this work?

Scholarships valued at $10,000 per work term (four months) would be offered to student innovators intent on spending their terms developing their own ideas or enterprises. The scholarships would be distributed across Canada’s provinces and territories based on a prorated distribution and would be awarded based on applications. The collection of applications and delivery of funds would be coordinated with students’ post-secondary institutions and advertised on campuses and through institutions’ co-op programs.

What are the potential outcomes?

  • Canada’s innovative capacity would increase through the support and development of aspiring entrepreneurs in a co-op context.
  • The program would encourage the development of students’ entrepreneurial mindsets and innovation skills while still allowing them to experience formalized co-op programs. Students who haven’t actively considered entrepreneurship could be encouraged to give it a try by the provision of a considerable scholarship.

Mitacs Undergraduate & Graduate Co-op Program

Mitacs should expand its operations by introducing a series of co-op-specific awards at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Co-op student recipients would spend a work term in a Mitacs-endorsed research environment, developing their skills and contributing to their employers’ innovative efforts. These awards would augment Mitacs’ existing efforts to expand and support research-based innovation in Canada.

How would this work?

Many post-secondary institutions already have a relationship with Mitacs because of its research funding, training, and support for international research collaborations. The new program would build on these pre-existing relationships and the associated infrastructure. The resulting co-op opportunities with researchers across the country would yield benefits for post-secondary institution, Mitacs, and its partners.

What are the potential outcomes?

  • Co-op students interested in research and innovation would have a new way to pursue appropriate employment within their chosen field.
  • Increased partnership between Mitacs and post-secondary institutions will reduce competition for talented students, and it can create opportunities for the sharing of knowledge and resources.
Credit: Canadian Association for Co-operative Education (CAFCE)

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Support the young entrepreneurs under 18

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/09/2016 1476049200
Often, successful entrepreneurs start  businesses  before 18 years old. There should be programs to support young entrepreneurs under 18 years old p .... Read more

Often, successful entrepreneurs start  businesses  before 18 years old. There should be programs to support young entrepreneurs under 18 years old provided that they have good grades at school and they are getting their high school diploma.Then, We are working in order to have better entrepreneurship spirit and to have better results at the education level concurrently. BDC is well equipped  to implement such a program.

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L’idée de l’UDA : Les arts doivent être considérés comme un élément clé de l’éducation et faire partie intégrante de l’enseignement.

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/04/2016 1475610250
Tags: culture  arts 
La culture est une force. Les arts et la culture sont au cœur du développement chez les jeunes d’une attitude créative et de compétence .... Read more

La culture est une force. Les arts et la culture sont au cœur du développement chez les jeunes d’une attitude créative et de compétences essentielles dans une économie du savoir et de l’innovation.

La construction de l’identité culturelle et du sentiment d’appartenance à la société commence à l’école. On y apprend une langue et des références communes qui façonnent notre vision du monde et notre capacité à comprendre notre environnement et à y contribuer.

Non seulement l’éducation artistique contribue au développement personnel des élèves qui explorent leur créativité, mais elle les aide à trouver le mode de pensée qui leur convient avec pour résultat des progrès dans les autres disciplines comme les mathématiques ou la rédaction.

Pour encourager la persévérance scolaire

De nombreuses études le démontrent, nos partenaires enseignants et chercheurs en témoignent fréquemment, la pratique des arts, comme celle des sports, contribue à la motivation des élèves, à leur assiduité et à leur valorisation. C’est à ce jour le meilleur programme de persévérance scolaire qu’on ait à notre disposition. Nous vous invitons à lire à ce sujet les recherches produites par la firme canadienne Hill Stratégies qui ont, entre autres, analysé les données de méta-analyse sur des expériences réalisées dans plusieurs pays, dont l’Angleterre, l’Australie et les États-Unis. On y apprend que, au secondaire, le taux de décrochage atteint à peine 4 % chez les élèves initiés aux arts, contre 22 % chez ceux qui en ont été privés. La tendance se vérifie par la suite alors que deux fois plus d’élèves exposés aux arts obtiennent un diplôme et que 18 % d’entre eux obtiendront un baccalauréat, contre à peine 6 % dans le groupe des élèves qui n’ont pas eu cette chance. La pratique des arts semble même faire diminuer les disparités de réussite scolaire entre des groupes plus ou moins favorisés.

Pour le développement des compétences et de la créativité

On le constate, de façon plus large, la pratique des arts contribue au développement des compétences de générations d’élèves et cela se reflète jusque dans leur parcours professionnel. Est-ce que d’avoir joué au théâtre à l’école a de la valeur dans le CV d’un ingénieur ? Sans doute pas. Mais d’avoir ouvert son esprit à la créativité aura un impact sur son approche des défis qu’il aura à relever tout au long de sa carrière.

Pour que les arts demeurent au cœur de notre identité

L’intégration des arts dans l’enseignement a d’autres vertus. Bien entendu, elle encourage l’émergence de la vocation des futurs artistes. Mais elle contribue également au développement des publics de demain et à la consolidation de notre identité culturelle en tant que citoyens dans un pays composé d’identités multiples et de cultures riches, qu’elles s’expriment en français, en anglais ou dans l’une des nombreuses langues autochtones.

L’éveil aux différentes formes artistiques et le plaisir qu’on y trouve comme jeune public se répercuteront dans nos choix comme consommateurs dans notre vie adulte et plus tard comme parents et comme citoyens. Fréquenter le théâtre jeunesse, pratiquer les arts plastiques ou jouer dans l’orchestre de l’école nous amènera à être curieux de l’offre artistique, une fois devenus adultes. Les arts sous toutes leurs formes y gagneront, qu’ils s’offrent sur scène, en bibliothèques, au musée, dans les maisons de la culture, dans les galeries, en librairie, au cinéma ou sur toutes les plateformes numériques possibles et imaginables.

Alors que nos artistes affrontent une concurrence de plus en plus vive, que ce soit de la part de créateurs de partout dans le monde ou de la part d’autres formes de loisirs comme les jeux vidéo, nous devons stimuler l’intérêt et créer un appétit pour les œuvres qui viennent de notre propre terreau culturel pour ce qu’elles ont de spécifique et d’universel.

L’exposition des élèves aux arts, aux artistes, à la création et à la culture sous toutes ses formes se fait en encourageant un double mouvement : faire plus de place aux arts dans les classes et amener les élèves à la rencontre de la création dans des espaces consacrés aux arts et à la culture.

Qui est l'UDA et qui sont les artistes qu'elle représente?

Fondée en 1937, l’Union des artistes (UDA) est un syndicat professionnel représentant près de 13 060 artistes, dont environ 8 440 membres actifs et 4 620 stagiaires, regroupés au sein de quatre catégories : acteurs, chanteurs, animateurs et danseurs. Ils exercent leur métier dans plusieurs disciplines. Ils sont artistes de variétés, comédiens, chanteurs lyriques, cascadeurs, choristes, directeurs de plateau, humoristes, annonceurs et chorégraphes pour n’en nommer que quelques-uns.

L’UDA représente les artistes professionnels œuvrant en français au Québec et ailleurs au Canada, de même que tous les artistes œuvrant dans une autre langue que le français sauf dans une production faite et exécutée en anglais et destinée principalement à un public de langue anglaise. À ce titre, l’UDA est reconnue en vertu de la Loi sur le statut professionnel et les conditions d’engagement des artistes de la scène, du disque et du cinéma (loi provinciale promulguée en 1987) et accréditée en vertu de la Loi concernant le statut de l’artiste et régissant les relations professionnelles entre artistes et producteurs au Canada (loi fédérale promulguée en 1992). 

La mission de l’UDA : défendre les intérêts sociaux, économiques et moraux de ses membres, qui sont pour la majorité des travailleurs autonomes. Au cœur de ses activités : négocier des conditions minimales de travail et de rémunération des artistes dans les secteurs de sa compétence et assurer le respect des ententes collectives.  

L’UDA est membre de Compétence Culture, le comité sectoriel de main-d’œuvre du secteur de la culture, ainsi que de la Coalition pour la diversité culturelle (CDC). L’UDA est aussi affiliée à la Fédération internationale des acteurs (FIA).

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Capacity Building Trainings

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/03/2016 1475498098
Tags:
My workshop is titled *Incarnate*, the idea is to take our knowledge a step further through a multitude of mediums, the spiritual centre alignment of .... Read more

My workshop is titled *Incarnate*, the idea is to take our knowledge a step further through a multitude of mediums, the spiritual centre alignment of energy, understanding of our self, personality development, confidence building, recognising true inner potential through collective wisdom.

Lastly my idea is based on interaction through real time and augmented reality based designed trainings.

 

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Focused Summer Camps

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/02/2016 1475434910
Tags:
The Youth, possibly after, or during grade 11 or 12, can be invited to special purpose camps (something like military ones) and given a focused pr .... Read more

The Youth, possibly after, or during grade 11 or 12, can be invited to special purpose camps (something like military ones) and given a focused programs and introduced to the basics of economy development, in addition to other national services guidlines. By adding fun activities, the youth share and get exposed to our planned future values in a non-forced environment. The duration can be for a week, and then rotate to accomodate all.

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corruption et demande d'assouplisement

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/02/2016 1475381704
Tags:
Au Québec, les petits entrepreneurs sont surtaxés. Je pense qu'on devrait adopter une politique d'assouplissement comme aux Etats-Unis. C'est un in .... Read more

Au Québec, les petits entrepreneurs sont surtaxés. Je pense qu'on devrait adopter une politique d'assouplissement comme aux Etats-Unis. C'est un incitatif, car investir, c'est prendre des risques et nous ne sommes pas tous enclins à le faire. Ici, quand vous y lancez, vous devenez l'élément cible, l'ennemi à abattre. Je vous peins, peut-être, un tableau sombre, mais c’est la face cachée du système québécois.

Que de petits investisseurs, comme moi, se plaignent de l'injustice gouvernemental. Vous avez l'impression que la machine étatique vous fait payer cher votre courage entrepreneurial ou votre volonté citoyenne de participer à l'émancipation socio-économique du pays. L'État provincial a le droit de violer ses propres lois, par contre un citoyen qui agirait ainsi se verrait infliger des intérêts inavouables et même la saisie de ses biens.

Prenons les vieilles écoles du Québec qui sont en piteux état. Vues de l'extérieur, elles ont l'air restaurées. Pourtant, ce sont de baraques d’asbestose, de moisissures et j'en passe. Certains enfants qui fréquentent nos écoles ont de graves problèmes de santé, y compris la leucémie. Mais personne n'en parle, car l'État est omniscient. Il règne en *magister dixit*

En revanche, j'ai acheté une propriété en 2010 en vue d'y installer un centre d'introduction au numérique. Un projet qui visait l'arrondissement de Villeray/Saint-Michel, un quartier où les enfants peinent à terminer les études secondaires. La cupidité et l’insouciance des fonctionnaires d'État ont saboté mon projet et m'ont littéralement ruinée.

Une propriété semi-commerciale dont les taxes n'excédaient pas 6000,00$ à l'achat sont passées à plus de 10000,00 en cinq ans. Pourtant, le local commercial est demeuré inoccupé depuis près deux ans, faute de moyen de restaurer la bâtisse vandalisée par des locataires évincés.

En effet, grâce à la complicité éhontée de quelques fonctionnaires d'état (inspecteurs de l'arrondissement et d'autres que je n'ose citer), pendant cinq ans, des soit-disant massothérapeutes qui n'étaient en fait que des prostitués et des narco-trafiquants ont pu occupé ce local commercial à moins de deux minutes à pied deux écoles primaires. Malgré de nombreuses plaintes des citoyens du quartier et de moi-même pour dénoncer la prostitution et la conduite indécente aux abords de deux écoles primaires, la Ville de Montréal s'est assurée de les protéger en insinuant que leur commerce était légal. Cela m'a valu cinq années de bataille juridique pour chasser ces occupants, une protection d'assurance à hauts risques dont les paiements mensuels variaient entre 489$ en 2011 à 638$ en 2015. Et malgré tout, on n'était pas assuré pour vandalisme à l'interne ou venant des locataires.

De plus, bien que la propriété soit estimée à la baisse par un évaluateur professionnel et bien qu'aucun estimateur de la Ville n'ait été sur les lieux pour une évaluation formelle, la ville continue quand même a augmenter les taxes immobilières à un rythme vertigineuse. 

Pour finir je dois encore une fois comparaître en audience pour n'avoir pas pu respecter le délai imparti par la Ville pour les travaux.

Notez que la propriété en question génère un revenu mensuel de 820,00$.

Si je devais dresser une liste des abus, méfait, violation de droits, dépense et vol, je n'en finirai pas.

Pour résumer, les citoyens qui se sentent appuyés par leur gouvernement dans leur esprit entrepreneurial le rendent bien à leur pays en travaillant à développer des talents locaux, à propulser les savoir-faire vers des marchés internationaux et ainsi à fortifier l'économie nationale.

Un citoyen qui mise tout: son avoir, son énergie et son temps, pour se lancer en entreprise, mérite d'être écouté et soutenu par les instances gouvernementales s'y rattachant. 

 

 

 

 

Credit: Nicky

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MintChip for Financial Literacy

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 10/01/2016 1475351009
Tags:
Manipulate MintChip for Financial Literacy Curriculum mandatory for K- Grade 12 to learn and understand about Financial Literacy. All level of gover .... Read more

Manipulate MintChip for Financial Literacy

Curriculum mandatory for K- Grade 12 to learn and understand about Financial Literacy.

All level of governments support the classroom materials and content. Federal Govt can manipulate the MintChip System which allow classroom access. Students would learn about how credit works, saving for a purpose, understand basic needs and fundamental living necessities.

Credit: Royal Canadian Mint

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jeunes et compétences dans l’économie

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/28/2016 1475106091
Tags:
Encourager le tourisme culturel international élaborer une revue mensuelle pour les innovateurs. investir dans des filmes et vidéo montrant comm .... Read more
  1. Encourager le tourisme culturel international
  2. élaborer une revue mensuelle pour les innovateurs.
  3. investir dans des filmes et vidéo montrant comment les premières innovations viennent au monde.et des documentaires. 
  4. pour répondre a comment innover?on peut se focaliser sur pourquoi ne pas innover?
  5. penser davantage aux postes a domiciles.

 

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"R&D" in Human Capital and in the Development of music

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/28/2016 1475073495
Tags:
The Canadian government should recognize that creative industries such as the music industry are innovation industries, which require similar support .... Read more

The Canadian government should recognize that creative industries such as the music industry are innovation industries, which require similar support for R&D.  The music industry has its own form of BERD, which is referred to as A&R, or Artists and Repertoire development.  The “product” that our industry produces is the recordings of talented human capital, discovered and nurtured by the music industry. 

 

The government should recognize that in an economy where an increasing proportion of creation is non-tangible, intellectual property, rather than physical products, R&D in human capital must be recognized as such and promoted.   Because our industry deals in non-tangible assets, our R&D is, in fact, in human capital and in the development of talent to create new products – in our case, music. 

 

The government should also recognize the considerable investment that our industry makes in human capital, and take steps to ensure that it continues.  The music industry reinvests more of its revenues into research and development of Canadian talent, in our case, A&R, than any comparative R&D sector (15.6% of overall revenues in 2013, or $2.5 billion). This surpasses the R&D investment by the traditional R&D sectors (such as pharma, software/computers, technology hardware, etc.) in Europe, Asia and North America. In a nutshell, the music industry punches well above its weight, investing a greater percentage of revenue in “R&D” than any of the traditional R&D industry sectors. In 2013, the industry invested some $4.3 billion worldwide in A&R, marketing and promotion. This represented some 27% of total recorded music industry revenues, an increase on the 26% invested in 2011.

 

The music industry’s continued reinvestment has come in the face of significant declines in revenue:  25% over the past decade. In order to continue the sustainability of such reinvestment, the industry must be ensured of a continued return on investment.  Continued sustained investments are threatened by an outdated legal regime that doesn’t offer proper protection in the digital economy and that creates barriers to entry to new music services.  Despite a 2012 update, which for the most part brought Canada’s copyright laws up to 1996 standards, Canada’s copyright laws (which are foundational to revenue generation for music and other creative industries) are inadequate for the digital era. While Europe and the US have and are engaged in generational updates, Canada doesn’t intend to even begin considering major updates until November of 2017, five years after our 1996-era laws came into effect.

The Copyright Act contains many exemptions and exceptions (tantamount to cross-industry subsidies) that were implemented 20 years ago, and yet are no longer justified. If left unchanged, many of these provisions will continue to stunt investment in the creative sector. 

 

Canada’s copyright regime also creates barriers to entry by new, consumer-friendly music services. New and innovative services need to know their costs of entry in order to secure investment and enter the Canadian market.  Marketplace certainty and speed of innovation are bottlenecked in Canada by a Copyright Board process that requires certain rights to be valued by a government tribunal, the Copyright Board, rather than set by negotiation.  The current Copyright Board process is too slow for today’s technology environment, issuing decisions years after new tariffs are proposed and new services wish to launch. Rights holders are prevented from negotiating terms directly with innovative companies by this bottleneck.  Most often, rates negotiated in the marketplace are dismissed by the Copyright Board. In certifying tariffs, the Copyright Board discards provisions other than rates and reporting, the only terms that it is expressly authorized to certify, preventing rights holders and users from customizing agreements to their needs.  The lack of prescribed timelines for proceedings limits innovation and new entrants into the market.  Board decisions are also mired in uncertainty, leaving new businesses unable to effectively plan for expenses, hindering new and innovative business models. 

 

A government tribunal process should not create bottlenecks to marketplace entry.  A thorough revision of the process is needed to provide certainty and decision deadlines.  Furthermore, where Canadian copyright law creates uncertainty of precisely which rights need to be secured, Parliament should act swiftly to update our laws to respond to new developments.

Credit: Music Canada

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Youth Should Be Taught Money Management for Many Reasons

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/27/2016 1475000217
Tags:
The Canadian and International economies have changed dramatically since 2008 and the youth need to be taught new and relevant skills in order to be .... Read more

The Canadian and International economies have changed dramatically since 2008 and the youth need to be taught new and relevant skills in order to be successful innovators in the future economy.

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Give used smart phones and tablets to elementary school children

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/27/2016 1474996215
Tags:
Many smart phones and tablets get thrown away or recycled every year because the technology moves ahead so fast.  Yet, our children could benefit fro .... Read more

Many smart phones and tablets get thrown away or recycled every year because the technology moves ahead so fast.  Yet, our children could benefit from learning how to use them just with an internet connection, available in so many places for free as well as at home.  So many apps are available to assist our future generations in learning, and most are free to download.  Also, this is smaller to carry around than a laptop and I suspect far more of these devices are available.  They are a great training ground to the world of the future, understanding communication tools, sharing, searching, asking questions, etc.  As a grandmother of 5 grandchildren I have seen them pick it up so easily and really learn a lot, even pre-school.  The beauty is that it is advantageous for children in every part of our society, and consequently may help in narrowing disadvantages experienced by children whose parents are unable to fund such devices.

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Give used smart phones and tablets to elementary school children

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/27/2016 1474996214
Tags:
Many smart phones and tablets get thrown away or recycled every year because the technology moves ahead so fast.  Yet, our children could benefit fro .... Read more

Many smart phones and tablets get thrown away or recycled every year because the technology moves ahead so fast.  Yet, our children could benefit from learning how to use them just with an internet connection, available in so many places for free as well as at home.  So many apps are available to assist our future generations in learning, and most are free to download.  Also, this is smaller to carry around than a laptop and I suspect far more of these devices are available.  They are a great training ground to the world of the future, understanding communication tools, sharing, searching, asking questions, etc.  As a grandmother of 5 grandchildren I have seen them pick it up so easily and really learn a lot, even pre-school.  The beauty is that it is advantageous for children in every part of our society, and consequently may help in narrowing disadvantages experienced by children whose parents are unable to fund such devices.

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Shifting the emphasis of Post-Secondary Tech Transfer and commercialization to students over faculty.

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/26/2016 1474920443
Tags:
I believe that students, rather than faculty, who should be our torch bearers for entrepreneurial activity in post-secondary institutions. One of the .... Read more

I believe that students, rather than faculty, who should be our torch bearers for entrepreneurial activity in post-secondary institutions.

One of the current tendencies in the post-secondary education system is the view that greater innovation – and therefore economic growth and social benefit – can result by strongly encouraging faculty members to commercialize their research.

The challenge is, however, that the incentive structure in post-secondary institutions is contradictory. Full-time faculty, especially on the tenure-track, do not generally include being an entrepreneur in their career development. Furthermore, the incentives for promotion are predominantly based on faculty’s ability to publish in journals as well as attract research funding. To successfully commercialize a research idea or launch a start-up based on their own research means dedicating time and effort that directly conflicts with their ability to publish and conduct research, not to mention the fact that it also requires a different set of skills that they may not have. While different funding sources have begun requiring a commercialization or economic impact component for funding to be awarded, many times these components are clumsily added on by research teams with no interest or expertise in the commercialization of the results. As result, the increased investments on faculty led innovation and commercialization may not yield the hoped-for returns.

Despite the above limitations, faculty-led entrepreneurship should still be rewarded (given that there is a small sub-set of faculty to engage and excel at this), but the emphasis should be to shift efforts to student-led innovation and commercialization. Encouragement, funding, and facilities should be made available for students to team up across faculties. The need to encourage multi-disciplinarity across the STEM, social sciences and humanities, and not focus only on business and STEM students is important as many of the solutions to today’s social and economic challenges will require a mix of skills and thinking; and the entrepreneurial inspiration may very likely come from outside business schools or engineering faculties. Mixed teams of students can come up with new business ideas, and create a pipeline for the various incubators that have appeared across the university/college/polytechnic landscape. This, along with major industry sponsored-competitions where teams of students can present their ideas, will help enhance the entrepreneurial culture in Canada – showing that being an entrepreneur is an acceptable career choice.

Countries such as Sweden noticed the need to increase the level of entrepreneurship and the creation of new firms in their economy, given the changes happening in their labour market and that they could not rely on the traditional large industries any longer. To shift to a culture of entrepreneurialism, the universities began implementing different programs that may serve as inspiration to the Canadian context. For example, at the Chalmers School of Entrepreneurship teams of students with a business idea are provided with courses and mentorship, and their ideas is transformed into a limited company in the university incubator (see Rasmussen and Sorheim, 2006). The Jonkoping University ‘Future Enterprise,’ is a course available for all students, and teams of students can establish their own company to parallel their study. During the course the students get access to experienced business mentors (Rasmussen and Sorheim, 2006). KTH (The Royal Technical University) in Stockholm has an incubator that actively seeks student teams from multiple faculties (e.g. business and engineering), combining the different skill sets into enterprises that could then be housed at the incubator (my own research).

We should also not forget our own Canadian efforts to encourage this shift to entrepreneurialism. For example, Olds College in Alberta requires all of its students to take a course on entrepreneurship in order to graduate. At OCAD University, my own institution, students are provided with a course in ‘Creative Practice’ which features the practical side of the art and design industry – where students learn some of the fundamentals of running their own practice; this in addition to the Imagination Catalyst, which is the university’s incubator. We should also not forget successful efforts such as Ryerson's various entrepreneurial "zones", encouraging  students and community members to explore possible ventures.

These efforts, while they stand out and are commendable, are not sufficient. They require broader support and acceptance amongst the post-secondary communities. To create an entrepreneurial culture, more has to be done, and we have to see it as more than the role of faculty, who create possible products in their laboratories, or business students who “take those kinds of courses”.

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Unemployment Solution with 30% Net Profit Margin

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/26/2016 1474908677
See attached image on how to achieve higher net profit margin.

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The job of the Miner of the Future will be a High Tech Career

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/23/2016 1474660495
Tags: mining 
Already, mining is embracing autonomous equipment and mining operations are utilizing integrated communications, mining big data and starting to deman .... Read more

Already, mining is embracing autonomous equipment and mining operations are utilizing integrated communications, mining big data and starting to demand that the miner has higher skills sets. Canada will need to equip the youth of the future with the right skills for this transitioning industry. Here are a few options to help prepare the youth for future careers in mining:

  1. Create more opportunities for Coop placements within the industry for students.
  2. Greater access to underground mines sites for educational field trips
  3. Establish equal standards of education more broadly across the country but with a specific focus on preparing non-traditional employees such as women and indigenous groups with the skills necessary to work in a highly technical resource extraction industry.
  4. Make automation/robotics a mandatory requirement at the high school level.
  5. Teach computer sciences/programming as early as elementary school.
  6. Integrate the mining process in all high schools’ curriculum (some currently do this in Northern Ontario)
  7. Support organizations that are promoting and advancing mining innovations and skills development.
Credit: Centre for Excellence In Mining Innovation, CEMI

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Whole Girl, Whole World through Digital Filmmaking

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/23/2016 1474645330
Digital filmmaking has become more pervasive than ever in all areas of life. The influential broadcasting quality of the film medium is apparent on vi .... Read more

Digital filmmaking has become more pervasive than ever in all areas of life. The influential broadcasting quality of the film medium is apparent on virtual platforms like YouTube, where millions of young people view independent films every day. With this distribution power, young women’s perspectives can impact their families, peers, communities, and the world.

Credit: Chantal Drolet

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Youth

Question:How do we work together to equip youth with the right skills for the future economy?
on 09/21/2016 1474471576
Tags: youth 
-Young people need to be involved in science; we must create initiatives for students to participate and become better innovators. Have Universities i .... Read more

-Young people need to be involved in science; we must create initiatives for students to participate and become better innovators. Have Universities involved with communities to tap into and cultivate youth’s knowledge. Build research centres. Smart kids are falling off the map due to lack of programs.

-When students leave their reserve for education they typically do not return; we need better motivators to have young indigenous graduates return home and invest in their communities.

Credit: Indigenous Roundtable hosted by MP Don Rusnak

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